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Old Jan 29, 2006, 6:51 AM   #1
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Hi Fuji Friends,

I have an S9000 and I was wondering if there is suppose to be a noticeable difference between the 9MP normal setting and the 9MP fine setting. This setting uses up twice as much space so I would think the quality would be better. I can't notice any difference on my computer. Will this difference show up in print? I am new at this so any advice will be appreciated



Thank, Joe


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Old Jan 29, 2006, 9:56 AM   #2
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Both settings produce images with the same number of pixels. The difference is that the normal setting compresses the image more aggressively. This can create more noticeable JPEG artifacts in some situations. For instance, if you know that you are going to want to make very large prints, it would probably the best to shoot in the Fine mode. Also, if you zoom in your images with your photo editing software you will see more distortion in the normal images. So if you are going to crop an image extensively the Normal mode may be a little more problematic. But if your style of shooting and what you are doing with your images produces good results in the normal mode there is nothing wrong with using it. That is why it is there. Good luck, and congratulations on buying a wonderful camera.
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Old Jan 29, 2006, 1:59 PM   #3
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Thank you for the advice. I love my camera and I hope I will be able to improve my picture taking withhelp frompeople like you thanks again

Joe
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Old Jan 29, 2006, 2:32 PM   #4
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I too notice a difference only under extreme magnification so for general photography I use 9N. For something critical and or something you plan on doing a lot of PP use 9F or better yet RAW.

Tom
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Old Jan 30, 2006, 6:18 PM   #5
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Hello,
You may not see it, but the difference is there. In 9MP normal setting the camera creates a compressed JPG file. It's like saving a tiff file in JPG format and choosing "good" quality instead of "maximum" quality. There is a bit of compression. You can't see the difference but it matters a lot when you going to do any kind of editing.

When you take an image and start to tweak things like levels, hue, saturation, apply filters, etc. you begin to discard pixels FAST.

The image will degrade with any kind of manipulation, so you need to remember a few things:

-Start out with the maximum number of pixels you can (9F)

-Always keep a copy of the original image pre-processing, just in case you go too far down the rabbit hole.

-Don't over do the post-processing. Sometimes subtle changes is all you need.

-If you don't do much PP and your goal is to print photos at about letter size or less, 9F, 9N, 3:2 or even 5MP (if you care a lot about space) give you plenty of resolution.

For prints, megapixel count is no big deal. Good color balance, contrast and composition are far more important.
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Old Feb 2, 2006, 10:44 PM   #6
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"For prints, megapixel count is no big deal. Good color balance, contrast and composition are far more important." from grafight



I second that! I have printed 8X10 prints from my 2 mp Toshiba with my HP 6 ink printer and the result was ...well pretty darn good. Even in a 2 megapixel camera the print at littlemanipulation and no major cropping turned out as a very pleasing photo. I like the 9 megapixel fine for just that.. cropping if I have to, and for post processing, etc. But when it comes time to print, the quality will still be there.

Vern


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Old Feb 3, 2006, 12:40 AM   #7
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Joe,

Take a few pics in 9mp Normal and a few in 9mp Fine, mix them together, show to your friends see if they can tell the difference. The answer is no.

A few months ago before Christmas, I met a high school kid at the lab, he picked up a 20X30 print, a beautiful pic of his girlfriend, he said it's from a point and shoot camera, I thought this kid was high. Later I asked the lab owner to confirm it, yes it was a p&s. I realized that it's the love in the guy that motivated his artistic in him to create such beautiful shot.

Last week, I stopped by at a local camera store to buy a portfolio book, there were three female customers waiting in front of me at the service counter. The first one asked for aflash meter, the second one asked for a pc cord, the third one asked for darkroom paper, maybe for photography class because nowaday we don't mess around with chemical solution, we use photoshop. I am not surprised if these were male customers, and I'm sure these were not soccer moms either, soccer moms don't buy those stuff, they buy album, scrapbooks....so watch out, these female photographers are getting serious, and we are here counting pixels under the microscope.

The S9000 is a very capable camera, I suggest you join a photo club in your area. In the club, you have a chance tomeetmembers, make friends,you learn from their experience, learn the good and bad about their cameras, see their portfolio,learntheir technique, you talk to them face to face. You learn how to use a tripod with style, have you seen a real tripod photographer in action? When he's done, he flips the tripod upside down, bang, all the legs retract to the base, quite a scene. Some clubs organize studio shoots with discount rate, learn studio set up in real life hands on experience.Get to know the studioowner, he'll give youfriendly rate when you need studio for your family/friendsportraits, college graduation, weddings...

The S9000 will take you to any photography challenges beyond the textbook.
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Old Feb 4, 2006, 7:15 AM   #8
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At the time of image capture, you ususally only get one chance, and the more pixels you have the better, IMHO.

With the maximum number of pixels you can crop an image to a greater extent.

The cost of CF cards has become so low, cost is not the same issue as it was last year.

You have a great camera, and 9F is better than 9N, IMHO.

Regards, Nicholas


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Old Feb 4, 2006, 10:19 AM   #9
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nickphoto123 wrote:
Quote:
At the time of image capture, you ususally only get one chance, and the more pixels you have the better, IMHO.

With the maximum number of pixels you can crop an image to a greater extent.

The cost of CF cards has become so low, cost is not the same issue as it was last year.

You have a great camera, and 9F is better than 9N, IMHO.

Regards, Nicholas


Nicholas, I agree completely with your statement, and that is why I always shoot in 12mp fine soft or RAW on my S7000.

Clyde
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Old Feb 4, 2006, 10:58 AM   #10
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Without looking totally contradictory, I also agree with Nicholas and Clyde. When I stated above that megapixels are not as important as compostions etc, that is very true, and printing 4X6 or up to 8X10 with uncropped images there is some, but ususally acceptable loss in quality (from low pixel count to hight pixel count).

When you start to tweak a photo, crop it, change this on it, the quality can become less and less. I was always a firm believer in "take the best shot you can, when you can" attitude. Some photographers in film used to shoot soft lenses with portraits, and that is all well and good. But there was a man that told me to shoot with the best resoultion I could get, and if it needed softening, I could always do that and correct that in the darkroom. The same idea works in digital. You might take a picture at a lower resolution out there in the field and when you get home and look at it on the comptuer say "WOW" and then start to tweak it and not get near the results you 'would' have gotten if you would have shot it at 9F. You are only there once and the capture of an image on a camera is but a fleeting moment. The photogrpaher is also known as "The Keeper of Light".
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