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Old Jan 31, 2006, 11:44 AM   #1
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After wading through the myriad of posts on here re. potential problems with the 9000/9500 I went and bought one. As a newbie to this camera and photography in general is there anyway someone can advise if I have a bad camera? As i am a relative novice I am not confidently able to examine my photos critically to determine if I have a problem?



Any advice/help is gratefully appreciated. I e-mail an full size image taken if required.

Many thanks
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Old Jan 31, 2006, 11:51 AM   #2
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http://img372.imageshack.us/img372/4048/dscf01029ld.jpg
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Old Jan 31, 2006, 12:51 PM   #3
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The image you posted is a rather interesting one. But it would be a very difficult image for the camera to determine what the center of focus would be. The areas that are sharp in the picture look good to me. Personally, from the looks of your one image, I would suggest that you just get busy and take a lot of pictures. The camera you purchased has a lot of different options on it, and you need to learn how to use them. But don't forget that the camera records the image that you, the photographer, composes. Just get busy and practice. By the way, the image really is quite interesting.
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Old Jan 31, 2006, 12:55 PM   #4
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Thanks for the advice and comment on the image posted. It's a water wheel and I was experimenting with shutter priority mode. On looking at all my images taken so far, I don't think I have a lemon but as you say will put the camera through its paces!

Cheers
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Old Jan 31, 2006, 2:52 PM   #5
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Hi Vipes, A really intriguing subject - you must retake that shot and try and eliminate the highlights.I think its got great potential for the Critiques Forum!

I agree with what Jim has said, those areas that are clear look good to me. Just snap away and I'm sure anyreservations you may have will soon evaporate. Don't be afraid to post pics here - there are a lot of knowledgeable and enthusiastic folk around who know what they are talking about- especially when it comes to the 9500.
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Old Jan 31, 2006, 10:51 PM   #6
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Vipes,

Here is the what happened. The water wheel is spinning createa soft focus filter in front of the focus point in the middle, in this case the brick wall. If you are a portrait/wedding photographer, you recognize this effect right away. Let's replace the wall with a model, you'll see her feature softened a little because the wheel spins fast speed.

Soft focus is difficult to master, it took me years to do it right the way I see the beauty of a romantic mood. Film or digital, when you use soft filter, you have to do it right otherwise you'll have a hard time to touch up any blemishes or whatever faulton the model. Not all pro dare to use soft focus effect. Of course there are commercial filters on the market but you don't want your pictures look the same as the guy next to you, you need to spend a lot of time and money to make your own, I did these experiments when I still shoot film, it's very costly, now with digital I have a better chance to improve my skill further. You can do soft in software/pp but the outcome is different from in camera.

Your camera is good.

Maybe this is your trick right?:-)

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Old Feb 2, 2006, 7:32 AM   #7
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I like the image.

ONE MAJOR WORD OF CAUTION:

1) When photographing machinery make sure you do not have any straps hanging loose ( your camera strap, camera bag strap).

2) Do not have your camera bag or strap around your neck or on your back. Place it on the ground (not attached to your body).

3) Do not have loose clothing onor a tie on your neck. Un-buttoned long sleeves are a danger.

These issues are very important especially when you are concentrating on composing your image in your viewfinder or LCD, you may loose your sense of distance from the machinery.

Hope everyone finds this useful advice.

Regards, Nicholas
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Old Feb 4, 2006, 4:35 PM   #8
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I thought this post would be worth a second view as the issue of safety rarely arises on photography forums.

Advanced Photogs and 'Newbies' hopefully willalways be alert when taking pics.

Regards, Nicholas
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