Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Fujifilm

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 18, 2006, 5:37 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 21
Default

I have been interested in buying a Fuji S-9000. I have rread many reviews on this camera, both online and in photo magazines. Generally they have been good reviews. Both in the some of the reviews and in 'Steves Forums' there has been that "however". Most everybody has said you can get good pictures from the S-9000, but that DSLRs are better. So I started looking at entry level DSLRs with kit lenses and comparing test results against the S-9000. It seems that the S-9000 is superior with barrel distortion, pincushion distortion, lense vignetting, sharpness and exposure. My first question is - if I keep the ISO at a setting where noise is not a problem, should the S-9000 get better results? (I know with the DSLRs I could buy better lenses than the kit lenses, but then the price starts to get alot higher).

My second question is - I have been reading alot of postings here, seems like people are buying defective cameras (or at least ones that need factory adjusting), are those from early models, are they a large percentage, if a buy a S-9000 in the next couple of weeks am I likely to get something I am not happy with?

Thanks, everyone.
Dadeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Mar 18, 2006, 6:23 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 1,063
Default

To answer your first question, I think if you keep the ISO at 200 or below you can expect to get pictures that will "rival" what you can get with a digital SLR, but I don't think they will necessarily be better. You have to remember that the digital SLR cameras have a significantly larger sensor and if you were to really drill down and get technical I think you would find that the pictures are technically a little bit better. But in reality I don't think it is a difference that you would ever detect without intentionally looking for it.

Your second question, who knows the answer? Personally, I think the incidence of faulty cameras is much lower than you would be led to believe. When I first got mine I went out and hurriedly took some pictures, downloaded them to my computer, and then broke out in a sweat thinking that I had one of the faulty ones. But I didn't. It just takes a little time to get used to how the camera works. I think you can buy with confidence.
jphess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 18, 2006, 8:42 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 14
Default

HI

Definately agree with Jphess

when i first got my camera - I went out took photos -came home, pics were rubbish.I paniked started seeing all these posts about the S9000/9500 not working. Then i took the manual out and started reading it. Eventually I came to the conclusion that it was operator error not camera error.

Now I get the pictures I want and am very happey with it!!! If u do get one make sure and read the manual especially about the different metering modes and the autofocus settings!!!

Joe90


joe90bentley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 19, 2006, 2:04 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 40
Default

I got my 9500 last wednesday. After reading the manual I started to take test pics today. All I can say is: If you know what you're doing the camera is awesome (for a non dSLR). The only thing which is not as reliable as it should is the automatic mode. If you take your pics in M (manual) or A (aperture) mode, the pics are excellent (same quality as my old Canon Powershot G6). I think it is an awesome package (9mp, 28mm wideangle, 300mm tele/10x zoom, excellent digital zoom, excellent macro mode, good image quality up to iso 400 and useable iso 800) that Fuji has delivered here ...
michael1973 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 20, 2006, 3:26 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
SteveDak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,471
Default

Dadeo wrote:
Quote:
My second question is - I have been reading alot of postings here, seems like people are buying defective cameras (or at least ones that need factory adjusting), are those from early models, are they a large percentage, if a buy a S-9000 in the next couple of weeks am I likely to get something I am not happy with?

Thanks, everyone.
In my opinion, the 9500 is a great camera and I am more than happy with mine- I can only enthusiastically echo the positive comments that the previous posters have made.

There have been problem units aroundbut these largely appear to have been confined to the early 53Q series of serial numbers. In most instances Fuji have done the right thing and either replaced the unit or attended to it, resulting ultimately in a happy owner. You should note however that there has also been a high incidence of user ignorance which I think confused the whole issue considerably in the earlymonths of it's release. Itis alsoworth noting that there have been very few reports of late, of suspected 'defective' cameras. It is significant that the happiest owners appear to bethose who have had the camerathe longest(and in some cases even entertaineddoubts of their own at one time or another).

The 9500 is not a DSLR anddoes not carry a DSLR price tag, but what a camera nontheless. I'm no expert, but I've compared prints from my 9500withawell respected DSLR and frankly couldn't tell you which camera produced whichprint. I stress though thatI am a bit of a heathen when it comes to the finer points of spotting variances in print quality.






SteveDak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 20, 2006, 8:39 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 1,063
Default

Some people who have a digital SLR seem to take on an attitude of "snobbery" and will be adamant when they tell you that there is no way that the 9000/9500 can produce an image as good as what columns from a digital SLR. If you want to get really technical, they are right. But unless you are one of these people who feel they have to view their images at 200 percent or more and do almost a pixel by pixel technical analysis, I think you will be happy with a 9000/9500.

The digital SLR cameras unquestionably provide a lot more versatility. But, frankly, I cannot afford to invest in a more expensive camera and several lenses. I'm on a rather tight budget. If I had chosen to purchase a low-end digital SLR I would be working with the cheap kit lens that wouldn't have near the range or quality of the lens that the 9000 has.
jphess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 20, 2006, 10:12 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
algold's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Israel
Posts: 369
Default

I bought 9500 for exactly the same reasons described above + little things, such as mechanical cable release socket, high flash sync speed (up to 1/1000 sec), studio flash sync terminal, ability to use AA batteries, dual format memory card slot, non-rotating front element of the lens, multiple exposure etc, etc - the list can be quite long. To make it short - it was the best camera for my needs and my budget.

9000/9500 does have limitations, as every other camera does, but I can live with them, as long as I know what they are and what to do to overcome it (or just to know how much it would have cost me to do it with another camera).

This is just my personal opinion, I don't sell cameras andI am not a professional photographer. I am just a regular John Doe that likes photography:-)

Best wishes
algold is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 22, 2006, 10:43 AM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 24
Default

How bad is the camera in automatic mode? If I get it, I will be using the variety of modes, but if I hand it over to my wife, I need it to be able to take decent pictures with automatic settings.
SilentBob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 22, 2006, 11:27 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 1,063
Default

That is exactly the way I use the camera. I like to take a lot of scenery photographs, and I like working in aperture preferred mode. But when my wife wants to take pictures of the grandkids, I just switch it to Auto and let her go at it. She gets very good pictures, and the flash works very well for her in the Auto mode.
jphess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 22, 2006, 2:25 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
SteveDak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,471
Default

Agree again with Jim, I've taken some really great shots in Auto and it is still my 'fail-safe' mode when a shot has to be taken quickly or I just want to be sure. Hasn't let me down once that I can recall. I often still take an 'auto mode'back up, if time permits in order to compare my progress in PASM modes.
SteveDak is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:59 AM.