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Old Apr 10, 2003, 4:44 PM   #1
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Default Help with using s602z

I'm having some problems taking sharp pictures with the fuji s602z camera indoors & outdoors on cloudy days. I shot using the 6mp fine setting as well as the 3 megapixel fine. The pictures for both settings come out bright with the right color and the correct saturation but they just look very soft. The settings i've used are:

f5.6 1/20 shutter speed
f5.6 1/2 shutter speed
f2.8 1/15 shutter speed
f2.8 1/60 shutter speed
f6 1.3 sec shutter speed


I've tried switching to normal sharpening from soft sharping but the pictures still come out looking extremely soft. I tried sharp but that makes the pictures look a little to pixelated sorta.

Even after running the pictures through photoshop i can't seem to make them sharp enough. They still look soft but not as soft as what they orginially were.

I tried using a tripod with the timer and the pictures still come out a little soft when it's full size. The pictures do look pretty good once they are shrunk down to a more managable size like 10 x 8 in photoshop. But if i want to print the picture won't shrinking them tham small hurt that qaulity of print?

The only way i can stop the images from looking soft is to turn on the flash, up the shutter speed and up the aperture.

What am i do wrong?
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Old Apr 10, 2003, 6:06 PM   #2
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Please post a full size sample or two from the camera that has the full exif data intact.

-Chris
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Old Apr 10, 2003, 8:26 PM   #3
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Your shutter speeds seem really slow (long) but even at that the use of a tripod should give you very high quality (sharp) pictures. One thing I have done is used the manual focus and forgot to switch back to auto, then wondered why my photos where, as you describe, shoft or somewhat fuzzy until I realized the focus lever was in the wrong position. ops:

As WmAx suggests, maybe a picture sample would help readers assist you.
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Old Apr 11, 2003, 9:35 AM   #4
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i'll post of of the 6 megapixel high quality files.
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Old Apr 11, 2003, 9:37 AM   #5
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Perhaps it's your monitor? How does your pic on screen, compare with one of Steve's demo pics? Have you printed any yet?

Your problem might just be lack of contrast in the scene. Have you tried out Unsharp mask yet, and some of the contrast tools?
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Old Apr 11, 2003, 9:42 AM   #6
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I suggest you check out my site at www.proshooter.homestead.com for tips.
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Old Apr 11, 2003, 1:48 PM   #7
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Let me post one of my pictures up along with the exif data.

The thing is the color + saturation looks fine. As well as the brightness. Is just everything looks soft for some reason. I haven't turned up the contrast yet but i'll try tonight after i take a sample pic. The contrast on my monitor now is set to 50% out of the full 100.

I'll take a look at proshooter and get some tips.

Thanks for the help
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Old Apr 13, 2003, 9:02 PM   #8
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Okay i was thinking about posting one of my 3 megapixel fine jpeg files but since i couldn't figure out how to do that I'll wait. But I did stumble upon a few more things.

My room is very bright, it has large floursent lights on the ceiling but when i'm shooting anything in my room at f3.2 - f4 and shutter speed of 1/4 - 1/10 (basically any combination of the above that puts the exposure right on the middle of the exposure bar and usually those combination does just that) the images come out very soft but with correct brightness even if i use a tripod. But if i turn the f stop up to let's say f7 or f8 and turn the shutter speed to 15-20 and pop the flash up (the exposure bar on the camera saids underexposure). The images come out very nice. The pictures do not look soft whatsoever and the images are great.

IS there anyway to take pictures in a bright floursent or any brightly lit room in general without using the flash? If there is a way can someone give me a short general list of f-stops and shutter speeds that i can use or at least experiment with?

In addition, can someone give me a short general list of f-stops and shutter speeds for shooting landscapes where the part I want to photograhp is in bright sun light? As well as In the shades?

I can use the SP mode when shooting landscapes and that yields very good pictures but I'm trying to learn how i can do the same using the manual mode. I'm looking through some digital photography books to help me but I'm thinking most people here should have some good experience with using this camera so perhaps someone can offer me a short general guideline sorta.

Thanks for listening to me rant and rave
Camerachallenge
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Old Apr 14, 2003, 5:36 AM   #9
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Flourescent lights may seem bright, but their colour isn't to digicams. Also they are switching on and off 50/60 times a second, so if your exposure is around this or a multiple, you may get a partially exposed frame (you see this mostly with movie cams). Also the rapid switching can interfere with digicams exposure calculation. The amount of light energy from flourescents, for photography, is very low. Otherwise, we'd all be using them instead of flash!

You should check out some of the colour balance presets. Be warned, although you may set a manual white balance in the menu, and the screen may show correct colour, flash defaults to near daylight when enabled. The resultant pic may be mixed light and look washed out. Even a couple of 12volt 50 watt halogens, with cam set to tungsten, will give you better results.

That's why, in mixed light and particularly with flourescent, you should rely on flash and up the shutter speed to reduce or kill the flourescent background light. Flash light is brighter and more standardised for photography than you think!

For a lot of indoor work with the 602, consider using an external flash - more light and less redeye.
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