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Old May 2, 2006, 9:03 PM   #11
Baz
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Yes Ken, The reps will tell you that Auto focus cameras must use a circular polarizer.

It is generalising. It is a myth. This way they sell more expensive circular filters.

It only applies to autofocus cameras such as dSLR's which have beam splitting, semi silvered mirrors. The majority of non dSLR cameras dont have that.

It is a much debated subject. That Google site is one opinion. There are many others on Google that differ. Here is another quote:

"Therefore, if your camera does not have a beam splitter, you can use linear polarizers. Virtually all consumer level digicams do not beam splitter, and all SLR/DSLR bodies have beam splitters.


The FZ20 does not, I repeat does not have a beam splitter. YOU CAN USE LINEAR POLARIZERS, in fact they usually are cheaper. The only benefit to using a circular polarizer is if you ever want to take it off and use it on an SLR (35mm camera) or DSLR (digital professional camera). But if you just are concerned with your FZ series camera then you can use either polarizer. The linear polarizers are probably a little bit better quality b/c you are shooting thru less glass, therefore, less chance of abberation. But, realistically, nobody would be able to tell the difference between two good quality polarizers (circular or linear)."

You will be aware of Mt Egmont here in NZ Ken. My avatar shows it with the winter coating of snow. Here is an image taken on 1st May showing it without snow. Rather unusal for this time of year in NZ. This was taken by the S9500 with a linear polarizer.
Polarizers have their maximum effect when the sun is at 90º from the direction the camera is pointing. This shot is not like that. It was taken at 8am with the sun behind the camera, and so it's not posted to show polarizering effect, but that the focus and metering is alright with the linear. f3.7 1/240sec 100iso


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Old May 2, 2006, 9:08 PM   #12
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cheers Baz

I am on the edge of buying a polar filter and im hapy my fz30 can take both. The shot is has very deep colours and it looks great.

Do you know much about dodgey hmoe made portrait lighting?

ken
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Old May 2, 2006, 9:48 PM   #13
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Fine Ken. Try the linear. Does your shop stock them? I had difficultly finding one in NZ. For the reasons already mentioned, many dealers only stock the circular.

Another FZ30 user commented the linear gave a more pronounced effect compared with the circular. You may have the opportunity to try both.

My experience has been as a Chemist & photo dealer previously. Used several film SLR's for years, and very keen on using polarisers to good effect. After getting a Fuji S602 digi camera, I fell for all the misinformation that autofocus cameras must use circulars. The results were disappointing compared to my experience in the film camera days.

Thats when I started to research this subject, and learned that we have been mislead. I have since got the linear, and in my opinion, it gives a better effect with the sky and clouds etc.

Sorry, cant help about home made portrait lighting Ken. But there are some experts on other forums here that may help.

Regards,
Baz
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Old May 2, 2006, 9:58 PM   #14
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Baz wrote:
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Fine Ken. Try the linear. Does your shop stock them? I had difficultly finding one in NZ. For the reasons already mentioned, many dealers only stock the circular.

Another FZ30 user commented the linear gave a more pronounced effect compared with the circular. You may have the opportunity to try both.

My experience has been as a Chemist & photo dealer previously. Used several film SLR's for years, and very keen on using polarisers to good effect. After getting a Fuji S602 digi camera, I fell for all the misinformation that autofocus cameras must use circulars. The results were disappointing compared to my experience in the film camera days.

Thats when I started to research this subject, and learned that we have been mislead. I have since got the linear, and in my opinion, it gives a better effect with the sky and clouds etc.

Sorry, cant help about home made portrait lighting Ken. But there are some experts on other forums here that may help.

Regards,
Baz

No worries mate

thanks for the info anyways and no the chain we work in doesnt stock accesorries like this so i have to place non refundable orders with suppliers. A big hassel. easier to use trade me i think

thanks again mate

ken


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Old May 18, 2006, 4:18 AM   #15
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Hello all ,

I have had my S9500 for two weeks now and I am using a Linear Polarising Filter.

I have had no problems with metering or focusing , with the rare exception of shaded areas the camera has taken a slightly dark shot or on two occasions mis-focused , this could be because I have shaky hands however .

I say go the Linear .
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Old Jul 5, 2006, 3:21 AM   #16
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According to what's been said previously it shouldn't be a problem when using a linear one ... a linear is only a problem with the semi transparent mirrors in SLR cams which use autofocus and light measuring based on the mirrors principles. And the fuji S9000/S9500 has no mirror ... Does this sound ok?
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Old Jul 27, 2006, 7:19 PM   #17
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So when does the external autofocus sensor come into play?* It wouldn't care about the construction of any filter!* The manual (p.36) only tells us when it DOESN'T work. * Quote: * ** *--The AF sensor --* The FinePix S9000 / FinePix S9500 uses an external AF sensor (external-light passive phase difference AF) that features faster AF operation than previous models. The external AF sensor does not function when Macro mode, Super macro mode, the digital zoom, AREA or C-AF focusing is used. It may take longer to focus if the external AF sensor is soiled.*
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Old Jul 27, 2006, 10:07 PM   #18
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Hi,

Can Fuji s5600 use linear polarising filter?

Wan
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Old Jul 28, 2006, 12:51 AM   #19
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kenmck15 wrote:
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Baz wrote:
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I guess you are now confused Michael. Kenmck's advice here is typical of some dealers.

It is incorrect. Nothing to do with "older cameras". Circulars are necessary with dSLR cameras because they use beam splitting. But for most non dSLR cameras, the linear is satisfactory. It will not cause the focus or metering to be "out of wack"

He probably has not used polarizers on the S9500. I have, and the focus/metering images with the linear polarizer are very satisfactory.

For your information Ken, the linear is alright with your Panasonic FZ30. In fact it will give better results than a circular. That was the conclusion(with examples) in a discussion on the Panasonic forum some time ago.

Regards
Baz




Thats very interesting. I am just going from information from our reps and a quick google search. i would be intereested to see the difference between linear vs circular.

this is the info i got from google

quote: "Circular Vs. Linear Polarizers
There are two types of polarizing filters available — linear or circular. Linear polarizers are more effective and less expensive than circular ones. But circular polarizers are needed with just about any camera that has a through-the-lens metering system, or autofocus.

The reason for this is that both of these systems use semi-silvered mirrors to siphon off some of the light coming though the lens. If that light is linearly polarized it renders either the metering or the autofocus ineffective. This means that you're going to have to buy circular polarizers unless you're shooting with a pre-1970's camera, or a view camera."

from: http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...larizers.shtml

Thanks for advice i will consider linear

ken

The key words to me are "use semi-silvered mirrors to siphon off some of the light coming though the lens". Now the only 'prosumer' digital camera I am aware of that used a beam splitting prism, was the HP 912. Most all the rest use either an Electronic View Finder, or an Optical View Finder. I do not think either of these systems rely upon any beam splitting technology. I find the linear polorizing filters works just fine on my Fuji's.



Geeeezzze Louise .... the difference in price is a mere $10 ... pick either one, or both. It really is not that big a deal.
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Old Jul 28, 2006, 7:46 AM   #20
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Ont thing I've noticed when using a polarizing filter is that the viewfinders "auto" exposure keeps changing the brightness of the display as the filter is turned, making it difficult to find the correct position.

I wish Fuji would redesign the viewfinder to reflect what would be seen by the sensor with the shutter speed and f-stop chosen. Add to that a live histogram and you would really know whether your exposure settings are adequate to capture the dynamic range of the scene.
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