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Old May 31, 2006, 1:31 AM   #1
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Hi.....

I would like some advice on my day trip to southend airshow. This for me is the start of something I have been planning for some months now. I brought a Fujifilm S5600 and have been reading the manual and taking test shots at heathrow and richmond park.

I decide as this was my first time using the camera at an airshow I would use the anti-blur mode so I could get use to tracking the aircraft with the camera through the view finder along with trying to keep a steady hand while moving the camera.

I have attached a photo taken which was not as clear or not in focus as the others, my own feelings about the shot is I was not as steady with the camera due to being a newbie and have blurred the shot.

If this is the case then I will practice trying to steady the camera and next time I feel that using the shutter priority mode with a ISO setting of 200/400 would be better as going to manual option on part cloudy/sunny day would mad at this stage

My camera is a Fujifilm S5600 with a OlympusTcon-17 1.7x lens

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Old May 31, 2006, 1:45 AM   #2
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Ok I have attached a second photo taken of a RAF Seaking which I am happy with. The conditions on the day were rain clouds with sun.
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Old May 31, 2006, 11:27 AM   #3
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I looked at the EXIF data for your first image. I think I would try shooting at ISO 200 rather than ISO 64. You were shooting at nearly full zoom, so your shutter speed was within the range for photographing a stationary object, but I don't think it was fast enough for trying to handhold the camera and photograph the moving aircraft. Shooting at ISO 200 would have increased the shutter speed to well over 1/1000 sec., and that would have probably contributed to a sharper image. All the anti-blur mode does is program the camera to use higher shutter speeds. You might want to try shutter priority mode and set your shutter speed to at least 1/1000 sec., and higher if it is at all practical. Just remember that shooting at long telephoto settings will bring your subject closer, but it will also magnify any camera movement. So anything you can do to either steady the camera or increase the shutter speed should really help.
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Old May 31, 2006, 12:55 PM   #4
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Thanks for the reply..

When I used the anti blur setting the ISO option is greyed out and you can not change it. I did not know that the ISO was 64. I think I will use the shutter setting and set the ISO to 200 as you suggest and then I can increase the shutter speed again as you suggest.

I was at full zoom all the time unless the aircraft came to close for the zoom then pulled the zoom back in.

Thanks for your help.
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Old May 31, 2006, 1:28 PM   #5
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Well, I guess that goes to show you how much I know about the anti-blur mode. Actually, I use the aperture preferred mode most of the time, and I use a tripod a lot. So, as you can see, we do very different types of photography.

Another thing I was thinking about is that you might consider using continuous auto focus. The camera is very quick to focus in that mode. The manual says to watch your battery levels closely because the batteries will drain more quickly. But I haven't found that to be a problem. Just carry an extra set of rechargeable batteries and you should not have any problems.
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Old May 31, 2006, 2:54 PM   #6
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To add a bit to what Jphess has said above. You can also use a "High-speed shooting" mode. It does limit your focus range to 4m - infinity (with aircrafts this wouldn't be a problem), but your camera will focus faster. This mode is described on p. 67 of the manual.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"BTW, very nice images.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"regards,

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Alex
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Old May 31, 2006, 3:22 PM   #7
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Thanks for all your help.

I have only had the camera for a short a while but I have been reading the manual not that I understand some of it. I was at the airshow with a friend who has the s5500 and he understands it all better than me, we both had the camera setup nearly the same as my anti-blur setting is the speed setting on his. We both were using the tcon-17 and of course all his well most of his pictures were crisp in focus.

So I put this down to him usingit few times before at airshows and had more time with his camera than me.

But since talking to you guys I now understand things a lot better except that I set the camera to shutter mode then increased the shutter speed to 1/1000 change the iso to 200 and the first thing I notice was that the aperture was set by the camera to f3.2..........Ok so I now that aperture and shutter work together but when I took a photo of my sons model plane the image was very dark even with flash which I believe was down to a small aperture and fast shutter speed.

so the higher the aperture number the larger the aperture is open and the smaller the number the less the aperture is open.

Am I understanding this right
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Old May 31, 2006, 4:11 PM   #8
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Your understanding is correct. However, if you use the shutter priority mode to set shutter speed that you want, then the aperture will be set automatically by the camera. Some people become concerned about using a wider aperture, but I think you will find that depth of field will most likely not be an issue for you.
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Old Jun 1, 2006, 8:07 AM   #9
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Quote:
so the higher the aperture number the larger the aperture is open and the smaller the number the less the aperture is open.
This is backwards. The lower the f-number, the larger the aperture and the higher the f-number the smaller the aperture. As I understand it, the f number is the ratio of the focal length of the lens to the diameter of the aperture, therefore, at a fixed focal length, a smaller aperture diameter gives a larger f-number.


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Old Jun 1, 2006, 10:53 AM   #10
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I certainly missed that error! f/8 is a smaller aperture than f/4. And I believe each step in aperture settings either doubles or cuts the light in half. So the f numbers do not reflect a relationship to each other.
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