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Old Sep 3, 2006, 2:59 PM   #1
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Hello again. I really grew attached to my S5200 to the point I wanna keep it instead taking it back to the retailer (see photo quality thread). I'd rather get around PF in PShop than taking it back. Since I'm still green to Fuji cams, can someone explain why the camera won't save in more than 72 dpi resolution no matter the number of pixels recorded. A good friend has a S9500 and even at 9 mpx, images are not recorded at higher than 72 dpi. Is this limit wanted? Is there a way to bypass this limit? Thanks again friends of this list. Germain.*
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Old Sep 3, 2006, 3:15 PM   #2
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72 ppi is just a number, the field has to contain something, some cameras have 72 some 96 some 300.

The ppi is a number field, stored in the information about the photo, embedded into the picture, it really means nothing special apart from that was what a technician back at Fuji wanted the default to be ..

If you take a picture , your camera sets the ppi to 72 , but it still has the same pixels and quality compared to a camera that sets the ppi to 300 (asuming both have the same number of pixels total ie megapixels)

The default ppimeans nothing really , the total number of pixels is what counts your camera has iirc 2592 x 1944 pixels.

If you actually printed a photo at 36in x 27in then yes, your ppi would be 72. Why ?

2592 pixels divided into 36 in = 72ppi

1944 pixels divided into 27in = 72ppi

Printing at 10x7.5 would give you ppi of 259, printing at 6x4 would.. well you get the idea.

In each case the pixels are divided by the size of the paper, that determines the final ppi , not what the default number set in your camera is.

Don't worry, this is a very commonarea for a newbie to be be unsure about.

Most see the default ppi and panic !


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Old Sep 3, 2006, 3:56 PM   #3
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There is no digital camera anywhere that actually officially shoots at 72 PPI. All digital cameras, regardless of make or model, record an image that is so many pixel wide and so many pixels high. Most digital cameras that I have used use the 72 PPI setting as a way to simply provide a size in inches so that you can tell how big the image would be at that resolution. If you use Photoshop or Photoshop elements you will find that if you shoot raw images with your camera, Camera Raw will automatically report them at 240 PPI. That picture is not different in size in any way from the standard JPEG. It still has the same physical pixel dimensions. It's just that a different resolution has been chosen to report the size.
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Old Sep 3, 2006, 9:05 PM   #4
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This article may help you understand dpi/ppi a little better: http://www.mattspinelli.com/ppidpi.html

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Old Sep 8, 2006, 12:59 AM   #5
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Hello friends, I checked carefully the number in the DPI field in let's say PShop. Using my Canon S2 IS back then, the DPI was set at 185, using my Nikon D50, the DPI number goes up to 300 and with the Fuji S5200, number drops to 72. A friend has a 9500 (which he loves by the way and reports no problem at all) and the DPI is set to 72 for him too. Furthermore, I noticed that blown to 200% in PShop, photos from the 5200 have the ugly jagged edges. Far less with the Canon and almost none with the D50. Opened in FinePixViewer, each and every photo takent with the S5200 are a lot more beautiful and they don't show any jagged edges hen upsized to even 300%, that is in FinePixViewer (which I regret it doesn't have any correction tools). So I went bactk to PShop and asked it opens new files in 300 DPI screen resolution. Now photos aken with the S5200 are simply beautiful. Am I doing something wrong here? Cause when I first opened the photos with PShop, they looked bad and that's what made me think the S5200 was a bad shooter. I read the information above but I still wonder why Fuji cams download on the computer at the lowest resolution possible. Does someone knows? Is it OK to boost the DPI as I am doing? Thanks so much friends. Germain.
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Old Sep 8, 2006, 9:22 AM   #6
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Germain,

The dpi setting that photoshop tells you has nothing to do with the resolution of the captured details of the picture.

When PS says that the dpi is 72 inches that means that the picture when printed will print 72 pixels for every inch. If the image is 2500 pixels in length, it will print 34.7 inches long. If PS is set to 300 dpi, the image will print 8.3 inches long.

Now, what may be happening is when you open the picture in PS you might be seeing the image at "print size" if this is the case it will look really large (and thus the details will be uglier compared to a file that has been opened at 180 or 300 dpi.

Changing this DPI field in the "image size" dialog box does not affect image quality as long as you don't have resampling turned on.
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Old Sep 8, 2006, 10:47 AM   #7
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The 9000/9500 does not take a picture at 72 PPI. It takes a picture that is 3488x2616 pixels. If you multiply those dimensions, you will discover that the image contains 9,124,608 pixels. That is why that particular model of camera is a 9 MP camera. The PPI setting refers to how densely those pixels are spread across the image on the screen or on the printed image. Screen images don't require as heavy density as printed images require. Most monitors typically display at a resolution of 72 PPI. So if you take all of those pixels from an image from a 9000/9500, and push them together so that there are 72 pixels per inch, the image is something like three feet wide by 2.5 feet high. But if you are going to print the image, that isn't going to be dense enough to render a good quality print. So those same 9 million pixels have to be "pushed" closer together to make the image more dense. When that happens, the image becomes smaller, but it is still the same number of pixels.

Fuji and many other companies have chosen to use 72 PPI as a reference point to give the user an idea of how large the image is. It has also been chosen because many users are looking for images primarily for viewing on the computer and to e-mail to others. Some Canon models use 180 PPI as a reference point. This does not change the actual physical size of the image; it still contains the same number of pixels. But if you look at the image in Photoshop or some other image editing software and display the dimensions, the size in inches will be less than half that of a 72 PPI image because the pixels have been pushed closer together. But the original image still contains the same number of pixels. Interestingly, in Adobe Camera Raw, a raw image from the 9000/9500 is opened at a default resolution of 240 PPI even though it still has the same number of pixels.

The PPI value is something that you have complete control over. It has nothing to do with quality of the image that the camera takes. When light hits the sensor it is recorded one pixel next to another pixel next to another, and so on. There is no control over the density of how those pixels are recorded. That reason the pictures from your 5200 have jagged edges at high magnification is because the camera has fewer pixels than the Nikon D50, and because the sensor is smaller. This is why the digital SLR cameras can provide a much higher quality image.
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