Steve's Digicams Forums

Steve's Digicams Forums (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/)
-   General Discussion (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/general-discussion-11/)
-   -   CCD vs CMOS (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/general-discussion-11/ccd-vs-cmos-28847/)

JimC Jul 20, 2004 9:27 AM

pauza wrote:
Quote:

Not exactly what I was hoped for, but many thanks, a lot of answers for everybody in other areas of digital photography.
Bottom line -- you can have a great CMOS Sensor, or a poor quality CMOS Sensor. At this point with digicams,NONE of the non-DSLR models with a CMOS sensor will produce photos anywhere nearas good as a similiar resolutionCCD Equipped camera. See myfirst post in this thread:

"Avoiddigital cameras selling for less than $1,000.00 with CMOS Sensors, with the exception of the Canon Digital Rebel (EOS-300D), which uses the same CMOS Sensor as the EOS-10D."



NHL Jul 20, 2004 9:41 AM

There's a summary on CCD vs CMOS from this company, which also had their hand on the Martian Rover's design: http://www.dalsa.com/markets/ccd_vs_cmos.asp

pauza Jul 21, 2004 5:41 AM

On another forum, someone said about Sony F717 being better at taking butterfly shots and sad about Canon 300D not capable to with unstabilised lens. Apparently this has nothing to do about CMOS-CCD talking but... it does somehow in my opinion. Of course, F717 lens have 2.0-2.4 aperture and 300D usual lens start about 2.8 and 3.5 so lot of "inside" light could mean better, in this case faster focus. Now about the sensors, what about CMOS "response"? Apparently the focus in dSLR has nothing to do with the imaging sensor, but what if the camera make a correct focus and the sensor is a bit behind? IS lens and predictive tracking of movement doesn't count if this is the case, so? Also it's said about CMOS to perform poorly in low light condition... a fast random-moving target must be captured at faster shutter speed so in order to have more light we need bigger aperture settings and in this case losing the focus range a lot. Or... we need a higher ISO... here come the noise again :(. Is the CCD more faster or capable of interpreting light better, or even both?

NHL Jul 21, 2004 9:03 AM

pauza wrote:
Quote:

On another forum, someone said about Sony F717 being better at taking butterfly shots and sad about Canon 300D not capable to with unstabilised lens. Apparently this has nothing to do about CMOS-CCD talking but...
He was refering to the shallower DOF on the larger 300D's CMOS sensor. One can of course decrease the aperture to increase the DOF, but at the expense of a higher ISO and "here come the noise again :(".
-> For the same apparent DOF, an F717/828 with a smaller CCD for example, can shoot wide open with a lower ISO than a DRebel stop-down with a higher ISO to maintain the same hand-holding shutter speed ;)

There's always flash and then all bets are off again... :idea:



Quote:

Also it's said about CMOS to perform poorly in low light condition...
This is not the case with either the 300D or 10D larger CMOS's:

http://www.pbase.com/image/28177621.jpg



... but then again so is the "king of noise" D7's with a smaller CCD:

http://www.pbase.com/image/6428981.jpg


Bottom line, get the camera that tickle you. I would worry more about convenience and poundage than CMOS vs CCD :-):-):-)

pauza Jul 22, 2004 4:07 AM

NHL wrote:
Quote:

Bottom line, get the camera that tickle you. I would worry more about convenience and poundage than CMOS vs CCD :-):-):-)
I want to buy a 300D and that I hope that in less than two weeks :D And I hope that the butterflies will be kind and stop while I make the shot :-)
Thanks for the answer.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:09 PM.