Steve's Digicams Forums

Steve's Digicams Forums (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/)
-   General Discussion (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/general-discussion-11/)
-   -   Exposure Metering (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/general-discussion-11/exposure-metering-51401/)

tommysdad Apr 4, 2005 2:36 PM

Please can someone explain exposure metering,Multi pattern,center weight,center spot.

My Kodak DX6490 is currently set to multi pattern (default I think).



Thanks

TommysDad


thebac Apr 4, 2005 8:37 PM

Multi-pattern metering takes into account everything in the picture to calculate the correct exposure settings.

If you use center-weighted, the center receives more weight in the exposure settings, though the rest of the image is also taken into account.

With center-spot, only a small area in the center is used by the metering sytem of the camera to calculate correct exposure settings, the rest is ignored.

jsiladi Apr 5, 2005 3:13 AM

tommysdad wrote:
Quote:

Please can someone explain exposure metering,Multi pattern,center weight,center spot.

My Kodak DX6490 is currently set to multi pattern (default I think).



Thanks

TommysDad

I think the best way to explain is to show you what spot metering does. Take a look at these 3 photos... All were spot metered on the indicated areas... To save loading time within your thread you'll have to click the links to see the photos..

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2.../P1020936m.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2.../P1020937m.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2.../P1020938m.jpg

All 3 were taken within 1 minute and are identical with the exception of the metering location used.. The camera was otherwise set on full auto. For my preference, the one metered on the water (first one) is the best of the 3. If multi pattern metering had been used, most likely you would end up with the photo similar to metered on the sky.. Center weighted might have gotten you closer to the metered on the trees picture but would have also taken into account the overall brightness of the scene, and therefore may have worked just fine.. If your camera Has spot metering, I would suggest learning how to use it and do so almost exclusively..

Some people might prefer the darker blue sky but in reality, it wasn't that dark blue.. However, metering on it fooled the camera into stopping way down on the aperture and using a very fast shutter speed, f5.6 @ 1/1600 sec. The same thing would happen if using a spot meter for a film camera.

The best way to learn for yourself is to pick a stongly backlit situation (a subject in front of a bright window for example) and go through the metering modes, meter on different locations in the scene, and see what they do.. Digital film is very cheap once you've paid for the card.

Photos taken with a Panasonic FZ20 btw..

Jeff
:G

tommysdad Apr 5, 2005 6:32 AM

Thanks very much for the in depth explanation,I will be wasting digital film all day :-)



TommysDad


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:38 PM.