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-   -   Lighting changes signifacantly (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/general-discussion-11/lighting-changes-signifacantly-147099/)

dman777 Sep 27, 2008 1:25 AM

I just bought a Panasonic DMC-FS5K digital camera. Here are two pictures, both with the same settings(none auto...ISO set to 800). But one is significantly darker than the other. These were taken about 30 seconds apart. Why is the lighting so bad in the darker one? Is the camera defective?
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v6...7/P1000126.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v6...7/P1000128.jpg



Reanimator Sep 27, 2008 9:48 AM

its because spotlights have come on and are lighting the performers up

Gary

dman777 Sep 27, 2008 10:00 AM

naw, there was alot more light in that top picture when i took it...and it even showed well on my lcd. that's what i can't understand.

Reanimator Sep 27, 2008 10:26 AM

well if your sure its gotta be the 1/13 and 1/8 exposure time, second shot was longer which means more light gets in.

i opened the dark one in photoshop and adjusted levels and there is slight evidence of the top light, but if you look at the middle mans leg there is a very bright light on it that is lighting the spot thats very dark in the top shot

Gary

dman777 Sep 27, 2008 3:34 PM

On my camera I disabled the stablizer and put it on ISO 400 and my pics were plenty bright. But then I put the stablizer on mode 1 and on ISO 400 the pics were alot darker. Then I put it on ISO 800 and that restored the lighting in my pics. Why did the stablizer make my pics darker? or is there a short?

Also, I have 2 modes for stablizer...one for jitter correction all the time and the other mode only when I press the shutter button. Which mode is best for taking pics at a concert(i'm going to acl fest tonight)?




TCav Sep 27, 2008 7:14 PM

Image stabilization should not affect the exposure. I think there's something wrong with your camera. If you purchased it recently, you might be able to return it. If not, check with Panasonic's product support.

dman777 Sep 29, 2008 6:19 PM

One more question, with using ISO and no flash inside my apartment, if I zoom in on a image(my cat) is the pic. supposed to be alot darker than if zoomed out?

TCav Sep 29, 2008 8:33 PM

Only if you're using manual exposure.

the maximum aperture of your lens varies as you zoom in and out, with a larger maximum aperture at the wide end (letting in more light) and a smaller maximum aperture at the long end. If you don't slow down the shutter speed to make up for the loss of light, the image will be dark. The camera's autoexposure system should handle that for you.

Your camera is broken. Take it back.

slipe Oct 5, 2008 6:34 PM

Just judging by two photos I think it is a little premature to assume it is broken. It used a different exposure for the two shots in pattern metering, which might well not indicate a problem. The EXIF doesn't show whether you had face recognition switched on. And you don't mention whether you shoot with a half-press as many better photographers do, which could have been a factor if the light was changing or you changed the framing.

The second photo has what the camera could recognize as a face. If it did and exposed for the face the rest of the exposure is correct.

Even if the face recognition was turned off it is hard to tell what highlights were affecting the sensors considering the framing is different with the two shots as it relates to the bright areas. Most pattern metering is center weighted and the white cap in the middle of the photo could have affected the exposure more than with it off center.

And the lighting is definitely different between the two photos. Look at the light shining on the left guitarists leg in the second photo. No way the first exposure could have made that black if that light had been shining.

Using a small P&S with limited controls in such a situation will often give you that kind of variation. I think the darker one is more properly exposed BTW.

As far as the cat photo goes, that might be normal as well. With available indoor light the lens was likely full open and the camera might have been at the slowest shutter it uses for the mode you were using at wide angle. In that case zooming would make it darker. We would need to see the photos and the EXIF to even start guessing.



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