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-   -   Photographing Flat Glass. Help Please. (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/general-discussion-11/photographing-flat-glass-help-please-84842/)

BrierS Mar 27, 2006 7:55 PM

I have been trying to take some photographs of some sample insulating glass units and cannot seem to find a way to keep the reflection under control. When I set the camera up at an angle, it makes the 4" x 7" insulating unit appear odd shaped. I am using my FujiFilm S5000 with a wide-angle lense, macro setting and a variety of settings. With a tripod attached to a step ladder I can photograph from directly overhead yet when I do that the reflection renders an unusable photo. I am baffled. Help would be greatly appreciated.
Steve

rinniethehun Mar 27, 2006 8:18 PM

Is the reflection the result of the camera flash, or is it from ambient light in the room? If it's from the flash, don't use it - increase exposure time accordingly. If it's from ambient light, try putting a shield behind the camera, perhaps a tarp or even an umbrella to block out the objectionable light. Then add some light from an angle, perhaps two photofloods coming in from either side at a 45 degree angle.

the Hun


BrierS Mar 27, 2006 8:24 PM

Thank you. I'll try the added light from both sides angled. I made the mistake of the flash just once and it did exactly what I expected. I also tried a large umbrella both outside with solid overcast plus in our sunroom with no direct overhead natural light. The additional lighting will have to be my next. As you probably know, shooting directly over the subject the camera body reflects so that is not acceptable. Thanks again.
Steve

DBB Mar 27, 2006 8:30 PM

BrierS wrote:
Quote:

Thank you. I'll try the added light from both sides angled. I made the mistake of the flash just once and it did exactly what I expected. I also tried a large umbrella both outside with solid overcast plus in our sunroom with no direct overhead natural light. The additional lighting will have to be my next. As you probably know, shooting directly over the subject the camera body reflects so that is not acceptable. Thanks again.
Steve
What you need is a polarising filter. It is designed just for the purpose of eliminating glare and reflection.

Dave

granthagen Mar 27, 2006 8:33 PM

If you have a polarizing filter large enough to hold in front of the lens without vignetting, that might help, also.

Grant

DBB beat me to the post! I should learn to type.

BrierS Mar 27, 2006 8:39 PM

Dave & Grant . . . thanks. I was just checking the one I have for the Nikon (62mm) and saw it is too large for the S-5000 (55mm). So, the possibility exists that I can still use it, as suggested, by removing the wide angle. The Promaster Spectrum 7 had been on my AF Nikkor so many years I had forgotten about it . . .
Thanks again.
Steve


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