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Old Jun 1, 2003, 8:50 AM   #1
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Default Storage Time Limits - CD-ROM

Greetings,

Just a question about storing all my digital images on a CDROM. I've got multiple copies....but is there a "time limit" when that data could become corrupted and should be re-copied to another CD?

Thanks!

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Old Jun 1, 2003, 9:02 AM   #2
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Theoretically, you could keep using those CDs as long as you can keep them scratch free. However, if you live in Belize you may have to worry about this:


http://www.nature.com/nsu/010628/010628-11.html
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Old Jun 1, 2003, 9:27 AM   #3
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They say 50-100 years, but I doubt we'd still be using CDs in that time...just look how many computer storage technologies are now hard to find, like 5 1/4" diskettes, not to mention 8".
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Old Jun 1, 2003, 12:36 PM   #4
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i believe there are some manufactures which say their cd's will last 100+ years. There are the gold dye kodak ones come to mind. Even though mike is right, in 10 years from now I believe no one will be using cd's anymore and it might even be hard to get a cdrom in that time, try and find a 5.25 floppy now, the 8" before my time
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Old Jun 1, 2003, 1:44 PM   #5
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floppy disks??

black and white tv??

eh?

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Old Jun 1, 2003, 2:15 PM   #6
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Just review the time when you might consider lossless copy to a new archive media. In the meantime, always test your archive cd's on any new pc build, perhaps keep the original drive just in case.

Who's to say Windows and JPEG will be flavour of the day in 50 years time. That's the thing about film negs and print - technology timeless!
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Old Jun 1, 2003, 2:16 PM   #7
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I read somewhere that only 2 medias can survive with time: paper and microfilm , not because that other medias worn out , but we won't be able retrieve the information ( floppy is an example, then soon will come zip disk etc …)
We still use microfilm archiving for engineering drawings (in parallel with digital form)
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Old Jun 1, 2003, 4:14 PM   #8
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Microfilm is also very popular in libraries. The devices to read them are very easy to make, and they don't require new "technology". Just a light an a powerful enough magnifying glass. The require some special ways to store them (and the media is improving in that way.)

As for CDs it depends on the media. A pressed CD will last the longest, CD-R comes next and then CD-RW. It all depends on the quality of the disks used…. But I don’t think I’d believe the numbers given, companies get into a war of numbers in such things, especially when almost no consumer can actually validate it. Also, read the storage requirements that come with the disks. Thing like sunlight will degrade the disks. Scratches are almost certain death. On a pressed CD, you can get away with scratching the non-data side some times, but writable disks are prone to scratches on the side you write on too. I believe the data is actually written on the backside of that surface, which makes it even more sensitive.

Oh, and to show my geekness (not my age) I saw a 10" floppy disks once at my dad's office when I was a kid. They were even scarcer than the 8".
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Old Jun 2, 2003, 11:08 AM   #9
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Quote:
Just review the time when you might consider lossless copy to a new archive media.
I have my eye on DVD RW. At the moment DVDRWs are being made which can burn CDs and DVDs. The burners are now becoming affordable - probably as cheap as chips in US.

It won't be too long b4 we must all consider copying our CDRs to DVDRs. At least one DVD will handle the same data as about 4 or 5 CDs.
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Old Jun 2, 2003, 11:30 AM   #10
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I say go with the flow...currently I use multiple (usually 3 of each CD-R I use) CD-R as back-up along with a second HD that is used for nothing but archiving. 1 set of CD-Rs are kept at another location. When a new and better media comes about I will just transfer my backups to it.
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