Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Sep 16, 2006, 6:09 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
BenjaminXYZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 788
Default

I always see such a feature on dSLRs such as the Olympus EVOLT E-500, Sony Alpha A100, and the Canon EOS 20/30D etc...

How essential is such a feature to you?
BenjaminXYZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Sep 16, 2006, 8:31 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
rjseeney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Taylor Mill, Kentucky
Posts: 2,398
Default

White balance doesn't mean a whole lot to me (or anyone else) who primarily shoots in RAW format. When shooting RAW, you adjust white balance during post. On the occasions I do shoot jpeg, I use the presets and the cameras generally do a decent job, but still need some adjusting in post work.
rjseeney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 16, 2006, 10:42 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
BenjaminXYZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 788
Default

So generally what does WB temperature or (kelvin) WB serves to do? (Curious)


BenjaminXYZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 16, 2006, 9:34 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
VTphotog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Extreme Northeastern Vermont, USA
Posts: 4,231
Default

Color temperature refers to the apparent temperature of the light source illuminating the scene you are taking the picture of. Direct sunlight on a clear day has a color temperature of around 5000 to 5500 degrees K. Incandescent lamps glow at a color temp of about 3500 K. If your WB is set for daylight, taking pictures indoors with incandescent light will give your picture a heavy red/yellow color cast - white objects will not appear truly white. Conversely, if you shoot outdoors with a WB setting for incandescent, you will have a very blue cast to the photo. Various types of light have different color temperatures, so the camera is able to compensate, either using Auto WB or some preset or custom setting.

brian
VTphotog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 17, 2006, 2:31 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
BenjaminXYZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 788
Default

Sowhy some cameras have such a list of color temperature selections?>>>

[align=center]


White balance
• Auto
• Overcast
• Shade
• Tungsten
• Sunlight
• Fluorescent 1
• Fluorescent 2
• Fluorescent 3
• Manual 'one-touch'
Kelvin (3000 - 7500 K, 7 steps)

WB fine tuning
• Red - Blue: +/- 7 steps (2 mired each)
• Green - Magenta: +/- 7 steps (2 mired each) [/align]
Or such as>>>

[align=center]


White balance

• Auto
• Daylight
• Shade
• Cloudy
• Tungsten
• Fluorescent
• Flash
Color temperature (2500 - 9900 K)
• Manual (Custom) [/align]

White balance fine tuning
• Auto (none)
• Preset WB: -3 to +3
• Fluorescent WB: -2 to +4
• Color temperature WB: -9 to +9
(Magenta to Green)

???


BenjaminXYZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 17, 2006, 11:03 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
rjseeney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Taylor Mill, Kentucky
Posts: 2,398
Default

This is an attempt to give the photographer the ability to correct white balance issues in camera. If your shooting JPEG, these adjustments are probably necessary. As I mentioned before, it is much easier (for me at least) to just shoot in RAW and correct white balance during conversion.
rjseeney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 17, 2006, 11:38 AM   #7
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

I often use custom or preset white balance settings (particularly when indoors in artificial lighting), even when I'm shooting in raw.

When using a flash indoors, I sometimes just set it to around 5500K instead (if most of the light is coming from the flash).

A number of raw converters can use the camera's settings for white balance.

So, by setting it in advance and shooting in raw, you have a good starting point for color accuracy when converting raw files, while still giving you the ability to change it later if you didn't get WB "just right' with your settings.

If your camera's auto WB is usually accurate in some conditions (for example, outdoors, most are pretty good), that makes it even easier when converting from raw using the camera's settings for WB.

I rarely use anything other than the camera's white balance settings as a starting point when converting raw images. I will "tweak" the color temperature sometimes if the camera doesn't get it right (but, I'd rather have it close to begin with).

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 2:16 PM.