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Old Nov 7, 2006, 10:37 AM   #1
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I guess I'm sort of old school. I want/like a little more control. Like my trusty old pentax k1000.

I wonder, is there a DSLR that will allow the aperture setting from the lens and the shutter speed from a good old dial?

I really like autofocus and image stabilization,
Am I just too old and set in my ways?
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Old Nov 7, 2006, 11:03 AM   #2
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Pansonic DMC-L1

This Panasonic is selling for around $1,995 now (with a stabilized Leica lens).


Leica Digilux 3 (for all practical purposes, a rebranded Panasonic with some cosmetic differences). Suggested List is $2,499

There are also some rangefinders and non-DSLR cameras available that let you select shutter speed from a dial.

From my perspective, it's just as easy (or easier) to spin a control wheel for aperture and shutter speed while watching them change in a camera's viewfinder. But, if you really want a separate shutter speed dial and the ability to set the aperture on the lens, look at the above models.

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Old Nov 7, 2006, 1:25 PM   #3
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rhendrix9 wrote:
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I guess I'm sort of old school. I want/like a little more control. Like my trusty old pentax k1000.

I wonder, is there a DSLR that will allow the aperture setting from the lens and the shutter speed from a good old dial?

I really like autofocus and image stabilization,
Am I just too old and set in my ways?
Yes, any pentax will fit the bill. I have a pentax *ist DL - my favorite lens is a 50mm pentax smc-a f1.7 - it is about 20 years old (i bought it used at a local camera store).

I use the aperture ring (you can use the M series lenses, and even the old m42 screwmounts with an adapter) to set the fstop. from there, the camera is metered by pressing the AE-L button on the back of the camera (this will select the appropriate shutter speed - at least what the camera thinks is appropriate). this has to be done in the camera's manual mode. if i want to adjust the shutter speed from there, i use the jog dial on the back to adjust the shutter speed. ISO can also be quickly adjusted via the function button on the back of the camera.

The best thing is, all of those wonderful lenses you have for your k1000 SLR camera will work with the entire pentax line of DSLRs. Check up on the K100D, or the K10D if you're looking for their newest and best!
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Old Nov 7, 2006, 1:50 PM   #4
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rhendrix9 wrote:
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...and the shutter speed from a good old dial
.
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Old Nov 7, 2006, 2:12 PM   #5
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Does the jog dial on the Pentax not count as setting the shutter speed by dial? While the dial doesn't have shutter speeds marked on itso you have to look at either the top display or through the viewfinder to watch the change in shutter speed, it does manually change the shutter speed. You don'tHAVE to use the AEL button to meter at all, and the camera won't automatically change the shutter speed when you change lighting conditions (as I have found out with a number of under or over exposed pictures when I forget to change things). Is there something I'm missing in this? I admit, my first (and only) 35mm camera was a Pentax ME and so it operated by aperture-priority, not fully manual, and I'm certainly not an expert, but thought this mode was really capable of being called completely manual.
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Old Nov 7, 2006, 2:16 PM   #6
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I think the OP wants to see the settings for shutter speed on a dial, versus spinning a dial or pressing a button and looking at a viewfinder or display to see the shutter speed.



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Old Nov 7, 2006, 3:19 PM   #7
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While I realize not a dSLR, the new Leica Digital M8 is probably about the most manual digital camera available.

However, just about all but the most entry level dSLR's offer very good manual control.
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Old Nov 8, 2006, 9:05 AM   #8
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JimC wrote:
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I think the OP wants to see the settings for shutter speed on a dial, versus spinning a dial or pressing a button and looking at a viewfinder or display to see the shutter speed.


That would have to be quite a fine dial - do they actually make cameras that have every available shutter speed from 1/4000th through, lets say 1 second? that would require (counts on fingers) over a dozen notches just based on half steps (i'm pretty sure there are more shutter speeds than that in my camera). a jog dial to adjust a visible display is still a manual jog dial, isn't it?
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Old Nov 8, 2006, 9:20 AM   #9
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A lot of film cameras used a dial for shutter speed. Having it another way is a relatively new invention. We didn't always have viewfinders with electronic displays and LCD panels. lol

I've got a Nikon body that I still use from time to time that has a separate dial for shutter speed. It's not even that old (introduced in the 80's). It's got Autoexposure, too (one of the positions on the dial). The speed settings are written from the middle outward to take up less space on the dial.

It's also got a top dial for aperture. Earlier Nikon bodies required you to use the aperture ring on the lens.

A Nikon body I'm looking at right now has one stop increments for shutter speed (Bulb, 1 second, 1/2 second, 1/4 second, 1/8 second, 1/15 second, etc. through 1/2000 second). You'll see the available settings vary between cameras.

You'd need to look at the photos from the Panasonic/Leica models to see what options you have available. It varies by camera model. My oldest serious camera is an old Canon Rangefinder that I started using many years ago. I'd have to dig it out of a closet to see what it's options are. It probably didn't have shutter speeds anywhere near that fast (1/2000 second is screaming). lol

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Old Nov 8, 2006, 9:31 AM   #10
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JimC, you always seems to have cameras everywhere around you! I wonder how many must you be having around now! :?

:-):G
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