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Old Nov 22, 2006, 12:45 PM   #1
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Hello again; :-)

I was thinkingwhetherwould it possible for me to use a 50 mm prime lens,on a 1.5 crop factor dSLR, as a walk around lens; the real focal lengthwould approximately be 75 mm. I would like to knowthelimitations of walking around with 75 mm basically.

I don't plan to get up close and personal (Telephoto), or get really wide (Ultra wide angle). I am just concern about the potential hindrance that the 75 mm focal lengthwould begiving me that's all.

Interior photography where spaces can become cramped isn't a factor for me, as I am not really into interior photography. Same thing; getting upclose and personalwith distance stage characters aren't a factor for me either. (I'll probably begetting a fast 85 mm primelens for that later on)

The question is; would the 75 mm focal length limit me (In anyway)in broad outdoor conditions, and in more spacious indoor conditions?

Generally, I know I would be having theadvantage of the 50 mm prime lens;such as the larger maxaperture, brighter/clearer viewfinder, shallower dept of field, andsuperb optical characteristics etc...

Ijust want toknow your thoughts.

Thanks.
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Old Nov 24, 2006, 11:21 AM   #2
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The 75mm (35mm EFL) is slightly telephoto so you have to accept that you won't always be able to position yourself to frame the shot as you wish.

I have read about photographers who challenge themselves by bringing only one lens on a shoot or using only one focal length on the zoom to force them to see the scene in a particular way. Your milage may vary.
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Old Nov 24, 2006, 11:37 AM   #3
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Bob, thanks for your explicit reply.


I was beginning to think thatwalking around with a 75 mm focal lengthmight not be a problem; when I didn't see any replies.

Using 75 mm as a walk aroundfocal lengthdoesn't sound like a bad idea to me.

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The 75mm (35mm EFL) is slightly telephoto so you have to accept that you won't always be able to position yourself to frame the shot as you wish. 

I have read about photographers who challenge themselves by bringing only one lens on a shoot or using only one focal length on the zoom to force them to see the scene in a particular way. Your milage may vary.
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Old Nov 24, 2006, 11:53 AM   #4
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i've taken out just the 50mm on a few occasions. in general it is a good viewing length. if your subject gets to be within 3-4 feet of you (speaking in terms of people) it is hard to frame much more than part of their face - to give you an idea of it's relative magnification at 1.5x crop. if you were outdoors shooting architecture or relatively close landscapes/scenery, i think you'll get some pretty good photos with the 50mm.
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Old Nov 24, 2006, 12:03 PM   #5
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Quote:

i've taken out just the 50mm on a few occasions. in general it is a good viewing length. if your subject gets to be within 3-4 feet of you (speaking in terms of people) it is hard to frame much more than part of their face - to give you an idea of it's relative magnification at 1.5x crop. if you were outdoors shooting architecture or relatively close landscapes/scenery, i think you'll get some pretty good photos with the 50mm.

That's nice! :-)

BTW, any idea how many "x" zoom is 75 mm? :?(I want to get the idea a bit...)
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Old Nov 24, 2006, 1:02 PM   #6
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Any prime lens is 1x. The x rating is your longest focal length divided by your shortest. Since primes are only one length, there is no x factor.

If your referring to field of view compared to what is considered normal, 75mm is about 50% longer than "normal" (that being 50mm). I find the 50 to be a great portrait lens, but a bit long for walkaround use.
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Old Nov 24, 2006, 1:12 PM   #7
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If you're refering to the "x" of binoculars (as opposed to point-and-shot cameras) then its about 1.5x. The human eye sees at roughly 50mm. So you won't be getting what you see, but it will be kinda close.

If you're refering to the "x" of a point-and-shoot, then rjseeney is exactly right. Its a "1x", as the "x-factor" on point-and-shoot cameras are the ration of the short end of the zoom to the long end of the zoom. And since it isn't a zoom its a 1x.

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Old Nov 24, 2006, 1:45 PM   #8
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O, I see...

I just wanted to compare the 75 mm focal lengthto my compact digital camera with 3x optical zoom...(I want to know where the 75 mm focal length would fit...So that I can experiment around a bit...)

My compactstarts from 38 mm on wardsto goodness knows what focal length...(3x?) How to zoom in to 75 mm on my compact camera? My dead guess >>> 2x optical zoom; 2.5x optical zoom??? :lol:

My Sony DSC-N1 have a max zoom range of 114 mm (3 x) >>>

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/spec...sony_dscn1.asp (SIGH, just multiply by 3!)

EDIT: Around 2x! (2 x 38 = 76 LOL!) :lol:

Real answer: 1.97368421052x optical zoom on my digital compact N1 = 75 mm focal length. : D



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Old Nov 24, 2006, 2:43 PM   #9
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Hi Ben,

Say...what camera did you end up buying? Any pictures to share with us yet?


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Old Nov 24, 2006, 3:19 PM   #10
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Ben,

A 50mm fixed focal length would be very difficult as your only focal length.

You would be much better off using a 28mm or 35mm lens, which will give you much closer to the traditional "normal" angle of view that one gets using a 50mm lens on a FF camera.

There are a few photojournalists around who use a short telephoto ~75-85mm (35mm equivalent) as their only lens, but for most people it's not very practical.

In fact the group of people who most commonly use just a single focal length (the Leica rangefinder crowd) tend to use 35mm as their focal length of choice, with a smaller number using a 50mm lens. That is full frame of course; on a crop camera that works out at around 24mm or 35mm respectively.

On my 20D I (and a few of the Canon crowd here) use a 28mm f1.8 (*1.6 = 45mm equivalent) as a great low-light prime lens. I could live with that as my only lens, but I certainly couldn't live with my 50mm f1.8 as my only lens.

If you like the Pentax, then you should seriously check out their "pancake" lenses.

http://www.pentaxuser.co.uk/pages/news/pentax_DA40.htm

With the K100D that looks like a really cool documentary setup, very small & light f2.8 and image stabilised. A really nice alternative to a Leica M8!!




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