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Old Jun 19, 2003, 1:06 AM   #1
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Default Does size matter ?

What does the resolution (2506 x 1702) do or mean?
Same size but bigger in file size means better photo quality ? :lol:
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Old Jun 19, 2003, 1:12 AM   #2
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Same reply to your previous question.

The 2506 x 1702 is the effective pixel count.

Here's a good explanation from the HP website:

"A camera's resolution is determined by pixels—the more pixels, the higher the resolution. And the higher the resolution of a digital photo, the more you can enlarge it without losing image resolution. For example, the sensors on a 3.3-megapixel camera record approximately 3 million dots of information, which is enough detail to produce photo-quality images at sizes of up to 10" x 14"."
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Old Jun 19, 2003, 11:50 AM   #3
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Thank you
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Old Jun 19, 2003, 4:42 PM   #4
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Resolution

"Pixels" are the square dots that make up your photo (arranged in a grid).

All "resolution" means is the number of pixels that make up your photo.

If a photo has a resolution of 2506 x 1702 then that means that your photo is a grid of dots 2506 pixels wide by 1702 high. And if you multiply these two figures, you get the total number of pixels, which is just over 4 million pixels (4 megapixels).

Naturally, the higher the resolution (more pixels) then the crisper and clearer the photo is because it has more dots to make up the photo.

But bear in mind that resolution isn't the only, or the most important factor that governs picture quality. It's only really important if you want very sharp photos that can be blown up and still look sharp.

I should add that 2506 x 1702 is a non-standard resolution, and I've never heard of anyone using it for anything. Digital camera resolutions are almost always at 4:3 ratio, meaning they're 4 parts wide and 3 parts high. (This is the same shape as a standard computer screen, so it makes it easier to view the photos on screen.)

Personally, I think 4:3 is a stupid ratio and I wish digital cameras had something more like 16:9 which is the new standard for video. Digital cameras could at least have a 16:9 mode which cropped out the top and bottom of the photo. That would be great!

File size

Generally speaking; yes, the bigger the file, the better quality the photo. However, that's not true when an image is saved as a compressed file type.

A normal, uncompressed photo file (such as a BMP or a TIFF) is quite large. But if it's saved as a compressed file type such as a PNG then it's turned into a smaller file without losing any quality.

The most commonly used photo format is JPEG, which is a file type that uses something called "lossy compression". Lossy means that some quality is lost when the photo is compressed, so the filesize will be smaller than normal (about 1/6th the original size) but the quality of the photo will be slightly lower too.

However, if you use JPEGs (especially at high quality settings), the reduction in quality will be very slight, and you probably wouldn't be able to see it unless you looked extremely closely at the photo. And the benefit of course is that it saves on filesize so you can store more photos on your camera, and more on your hard drive.

So it's worth using the JPEG file format unless you're extremely fussy and you don't want to lose any image quality whatsoever. In which case use any lossless (opposite of lossy) file format your camera supports, such as TIFF, RAW or anything that says it is "uncompressed".

If you don't know much about digital imaging then I can't see you having any need to use anything other than JPEGs for the time being.
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Old Jun 19, 2003, 5:34 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grand Dizzy
Resolution

I should add that 2506 x 1702 is a non-standard resolution, and I've never heard of anyone using it for anything. Digital camera resolutions are almost always at 4:3 ratio, meaning they're 4 parts wide and 3 parts high. (This is the same shape as a standard computer screen, so it makes it easier to view the photos on screen.)

Personally, I think 4:3 is a stupid ratio and I wish digital cameras had something more like 16:9 which is the new standard for video. Digital cameras could at least have a 16:9 mode which cropped out the top and bottom of the photo. That would be great!
That ratio is basically "standard" photographic print size though, like the 6x4 shots you'd get if you took your memory card down to you local photolab.
My dad's Sony P1 digicam has an option to shoot in this mode (effectively cutting off the top and bottom of the picture like you say) specifically for this purpose of going and getting your pictures developed like most people fo with their holiday snaps.
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