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Old Nov 27, 2006, 9:13 PM   #1
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I haven't made a purchase yet, but have been reading reviews and forums like this. Boiling it down to KodakP880, Fuji s6000fd or s9100. A couple of questions -

1. EVF - It seems that most cameras have this or just the LCD. I can't see an LCD screen without glasses, but I can look thru a viewfinder with a diopter. Now I read that EVF will fade out in bright sunlight. Help! What should I be looking for in aviewfinder? I plan to take the camera on a trip to Egypt.

2. Megapixel count. As I read reviews, it mentions JPEG fine, standard, and etc. And some of the tech info makes it sound like on some settings you are shooting at less than the fullMP count for the camera. Is that so?I don't get it.

3. Storage - whether it's SD, xD or whatever - is a 1G card a 1G card, or are there differences that I should be aware of? i.e. are cards sold at a discount, slow and less stable?


I posted in this forum because I thought these questions were more about how digital cameras work in general vs. opinion on which one to buy.

Thank you!



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Old Nov 27, 2006, 9:25 PM   #2
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poppop wrote:
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I haven't made a purchase yet, but have been reading reviews and forums like this. Boiling it down to KodakP880, Fuji s6000fd or s9100. A couple of questions -

1. EVF - It seems that most cameras have this or just the LCD. I can't see an LCD screen without glasses, but I can look thru a viewfinder with a diopter. Now I read that EVF will fade out in bright sunlight. Help! What should I be looking for in aviewfinder? I plan to take the camera on a trip to Egypt.

2. Megapixel count. As I read reviews, it mentions JPEG fine, standard, and etc. And some of the tech info makes it sound like on some settings you are shooting at less than the fullMP count for the camera. Is that so?I don't get it.

3. Storage - whether it's SD, xD or whatever - is a 1G card a 1G card, or are there differences that I should be aware of? i.e. are cards sold at a discount, slow and less stable?


I posted in this forum because I thought these questions were more about how digital cameras work in general vs. opinion on which one to buy.

Thank you!


1
When I had my Fuji S5200, I never had any problem with the EVF fading out in bright sunlight. I am not sure where you heard that from. I only hear the LCD fading out because of the direct sunlight.

2
The megapixel is really how big the picture is. Typically the higher the MP, the sharper the image is, but it is not always the case. As you said there are Fine, Standard, and etc.. within each megapixel you set it to. Those are the compression. The higher the compression, the lower the picture quality, but you still retain the same pixel count for that picture. BUT the actual storage size is smaller because it is compressed more. Get it? Kinda confusing. :lol:

3
As far as the memory type goes, 1GB SD =1GB xD = 1GB CF= 1GB MS.... All of them hold the same amount of memory. But some are faster then others, they are usually rated in terms of speed like 40x, 80x or whatever. But you can't always trust those ratings. But other then that, they are about the same for the most part.

I hope that helps!


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Old Nov 27, 2006, 11:36 PM   #3
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Thanks for the info.

#1 about the EVF - I read it in a forum somewhere - a user with a bad experience. I am glad that this isn't always the case.

#2 about megapixels - that is a bit confusing!

#3 - sounds like same thing when one buys CDs to write to, so I get that now.

Thank you!
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Old Nov 28, 2006, 7:01 AM   #4
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Yes, the EVF can become very difficult to see when the ambient light is very strong. Egypt might be such a situitation. In Thailand, the sun is virtually directly overhead most of the time, so on a sunny day, the sun is very strong. Under those circumstances the EVF on my Sony R1 is VERY difficult to see.

Simply put, it does not put out a strong enough image to be easily visible under such bright conditions.

In low light situitations the EVF is easily visible, but the image stutters as the electronics struggle to keep up with movement in the display.
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Old Nov 28, 2006, 11:07 AM   #5
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I might be able to help out with #2
First off, a general suggestion. Just shoot at the largest image size and least compression (highest image quality.) My usual comments is if you find yourself running out of space on your flash card then I'd suggest buying more. If money is an issue, then consider compromises by using more compression. But do it in that order. You never know which image will be great... so switching between higher and lower quality images is risking you taking that great image with the wrong settings.

More details:
Most cameras can do one of two things in relation to the size of the image.
The first is to take a larger or smaller image. Lets say a camera produced an image that was 3000x2000 pixels at its largest size. It might have an option to take the picture at 2000x1000 as well. It would average the pixels together so there were fewer of them. The image would be of the same thing, but you'd have less data to work with (harder to make big prints.)

The other thing they can do is use more or less compression. The number of pixels will stay the same but the file size will be smaller because it will be compressed more. Cameras have varying names for the levels of compression. I'll use your terms. You could take the same picture at 3000x2000 pixels but in Fine and in Standard. The "fine" image would be larger than the "standard" one on the flash card (or your computer) because it would be compressed less. But when you open it up in an image editor both would have the same number of pixels (3000x2000.)

Now you have to understand that the compression is distructive. You *loose* image detail when you create a jpg. This is why I suggest you use the least amount of compression possible. The loss isn't always visible to the human eye, but it is happening.

I would suggest you take the same image in each of the levels of compression your camera supports and look at them on your computer. Zoom in somewhere where there is lots of detail and see what happend. Depending on the image you'll see the difference. I bet in almost all cases you'll see the difference between the highest image quality and the lowest.

Eric
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Old Nov 29, 2006, 12:42 AM   #6
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Thank you - Both of these answers help me understand more. I like the suggestions to do some practice with same shot, different compression and check it out.

Most pix I get from family and friends are in jpeg. I read a lot about RAW. Do you have to have special software to see your pix if they were taken/saved in RAW? (And I get that RAW is a lot bigger in size; huge).
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Old Nov 29, 2006, 7:01 AM   #7
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RAW - yes you need special software to see your raw images. But the normal procedure is to use that software to 'develop' the raw images and then save them as jpg. The advantage of raw is mainly if you are going to be either 1: going to do a lot of post processing (aka photoshop), or 2: if you are going to make VERY large prints.

Raw files are much bigger than jpg. For example, my R1 produced jpg's that are in the 4 MB range, while the raw file is 20 MB.
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