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Old Jun 24, 2003, 7:47 PM   #1
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Default Having problems with Fuji S602

Just bought a new S602 and what I get is not even close to what the expectation was. I mean I am not an expert in digital cameras, (actually in any cameras, which you will see soon when you read this posting) but even I can notice that my S602 is acting funny. Not sure if its the cam's fault or my fault and would really appreciate your help. Three questions: 1.When I press the button to take a picture, the cam actually takes the picture after few seconds, no matter how I change the settings, which means when I try to take a pic of my 5 years old smiling at me, in fact I get an image when he has already run away. 2. Also, do I have to manually pop up the flash every time? Is it not supposed to come up automatically if/when more light is needed? 3. And finally the only time when pics come out sharp is when the object does not move, but if I take some sports event, or something like that, the pics come out just terrible (in the auto mode, as well as in S, A and P modes have tried various speeds). Please, advice how to fix these problems, or I have to accept the fact that my wife was right when was telling me not to buy this thing but to go away for a weekend instead.
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Old Jun 24, 2003, 8:35 PM   #2
djb
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i hope i can help a little. 1. as for the "shutter lag" 5 seconds is way too long. my s602z doesn't have much lag at all. i don't think it's even 1 second. one way to get around the lag is to depress the shutter button half way and hold it there. this way the camera is in focus and will capture as soon as you push the button fully.
2. i'm not an expert on flash but, i think it has to be popped up manually. i have only used flash few times just diddling with it and it was on forced flash. maybe setting it so it is on autoflash may pop it up automatically. sorry this may be of no help. 3. i don't do sports anymore but, fast speeds and prefocussing helps. also what
iso are you using?? 160 and 200 may be a bit slow depending on light conditions. 4. now that you have the camera, take your wife's suggestion and take a week vacation with your new camera. digital photography is a bit different than film. unless you have a dslr there will be a bit of lag in capturing images. i'm used to film and still have a lot to learn about digital photography. hope this helps a little.

dennis
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Old Jun 24, 2003, 9:13 PM   #3
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1. Yup, shutter lag...it takes time for the camera to focus and set other settings. The tip about holding down the shutter button is one we all have to learn. In indoor/low-light situations it will take longer for the camera to focus.

2. Popping up the flash sets it (on most cameras) to auto mode, the camera will decide if the flash is needed or not. Having the flash down is the *off* position. It would be awkward if the flash popped up when needed causing you to react in surprise and move the camera. Also time is needed for the flash to charge up, and it wouldn't have that time if not already charged.

3. You have to learn some camera basics, like in lower light situations you need a slower shutter speed which means faster moving objects will blur.

Suggest you read up on the free online "book" at http://www.photocourse.com to get down a lot of the basics.

If you bought the camera from a store, you can go back there and ask them to check it for you to see if the camera is fine. Maybe you have a friend or neighbor heavily into digital cameras who can check it.
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Old Jun 25, 2003, 12:53 AM   #4
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Hi,
The flash does have to be popped up manually each time or you can leave the flash up while using the camera. Have you tried the sports setting on the camera? I am very new to digital photography and photography altogether. I tried the sports setting at my kids field day and was able to get pics easier than with the camera in auto. Just turn the dial on top of the camera to SP and then you will see at the bottom of the LCD screen where you can choose from several settings including portrait, landscape, sports setting (looks like an athlete running).
I hope this helps
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Old Jun 25, 2003, 6:00 AM   #5
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Thank you all very much, your comments are very useful!
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Old Jun 25, 2003, 10:24 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_PEAT
2. Popping up the flash sets it (on most cameras) to auto mode, the camera will decide if the flash is needed or not. Having the flash down is the *off* position. It would be awkward if the flash popped up when needed causing you to react in surprise and move the camera.
Actually many (most?) film SLRs pop up the flash automatically in low light situations. If the TTL meter doesn't register enough light, it pops up the strobe as you press the shutter button. Considering the relatively weak built-in strobes you get on these cams, the recharge time is not so long. I'd be willing to bet that they keep the flash pre-charged in most cases.

I was under the impression that the S602 had an auto-flash pop up feature. Now I'm going to have to be a pest at the camera shop across the street and try out all the digicam auto-flash settings...
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Old Jun 25, 2003, 11:11 PM   #7
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the flash must be popped up by using the button according to about 4 or 5 places in the manual. no auto-popup. the autoflash feature refers to the flash preflashing to adjust exposure.

dennis
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Old Jun 26, 2003, 3:04 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lauren
Actually many (most?) film SLRs pop up the flash automatically in low light situations. If the TTL meter doesn't register enough light, it pops up the strobe as you press the shutter button. Considering the relatively weak built-in strobes you get on these cams, the recharge time is not so long. I'd be willing to bet that they keep the flash pre-charged in most cases.
That's news to me (most SLRs don't even have a built-in flash). Also it takes a few seconds to charge a flash circuit; if you kept the circuit pre-charged, it would have to be on 24-7 for that instant that you wish to take a picture. Most likely these cameras have an on-off switch which you have to turn on first which also powers up the flash circuit.

Personally though, I'd rather have the control of deciding whether the flash has the ability to fire, or not at all (then again I don't bother with the automatic features of the camera).

Anyway, you have the ability of having an automatic flash with your camera by popping it up when you think you might need it (or every time you take a picture if you wish) and then the camera will decide if there's enough light or if the flash is needed.

I guess this method was done because unlike film cameras digitals run primarily on batteries and without batteries with a certain amount of power the digital will not operated (many SLRs can have the batteries removed and still work). Batteries are needed on digital not only to power the general camera circuitry, but also high power needs like writing to the card, operating the LCD/EVF, and lastly powering the flash.

I certainly wouldn't be happy if the flash was charged up each time I powered on the camera whether I needed it or not...I'd get a lot less photos that way. My previous digital was like that, and I was lucky to get 100 pictures out of a battery (with that camera I had to remember to disable the flash for those times I didn't want it to fire).
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Old Jun 26, 2003, 4:26 AM   #9
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Just got back from the shop across the street.

The Sigma SD9 and all Canons except the 10D do not have a built-in flash. The Fuji S2, Nikons and 10D do have the strobe built into the camera body, but unfortunately they all had ERR messages on the floor models so I couldn't try the auto-pop up feature.

I'll try again soon.

I took a look at the Canon and Nikon SLR lines and both lineups feature built-in strobes for all SLR models except for the two highest end professional series (EOS 1/EOS 3 and F5/F100). But to compare apples to apples, we'd have to compare the Canon 1D to the EOS 1 or 3 and the Nikon D1 to the F5 or F100 depending on whether you want to discuss "top of the line DSLR vs SLR" or similar camera bodies. But regardless, at that level the strobes are, as you said, not built into the camera.

Of course, any photographer who is serious about flash photography isn't going to rely on the built in flash. But I think I just way off topic so I'll just sit down now.
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