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Old Jan 12, 2007, 4:39 PM   #1
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Good day -

-- Has anyone had any problems entering an 'event' or show or ? with their camera?

-- I had read that some people were having problems because their camera looked 'professional' - ?

-- Now I have a single concrete example. The threshold for this one facility is - if the camera has a "removeable lens" you cannot bring it into the facility, regardless of the type of event / show.

-- I do not know if this is a -security- issue oran issueof them worrying about you -selling- photos you took at their event / show.

-- I am selling my D1x and getting a smaller, lesser, camera as I am having problems with my hands, my eyes, walking,etc and this will be used as a big point-n-shoot camera (with more functions).

-- I was considering the Nikon D40 (new lenses dammit), D50, Oly E500, Pentax K100 (all with an 18-200 or 28-300 for my big point-n-shoot)- all have 'removeable' lenses - and that might be a problem. So I moved to considering the Fuji S9100 (for the liveLCD for me).

-- If anyone has any experience with being refused entry, or has heard anything - that might impact what camera a lot of people consider.

Any input is appreciated. Thank you.
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Old Jan 12, 2007, 5:38 PM   #2
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I know that Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City does not allow cameras with detachable lenses and probably most other NFL stadiums are the same. I have heard of this at other events also. Best to always call in advance to be sure. I left my 20D at home and took my SD400 instead when I went to the Big 12 Championship game at Arrowhead.
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Old Jan 12, 2007, 6:26 PM   #3
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None of the major leagues (NBA, NFL, MLB) has a policy per se. Each stadium or facility makes their own rules. In many cases, it's the vague 'professional' comment. In other cases (like Cleveland's basketball arena) it's - no lens longer than 6".

Part of it has to do with seats being close and they don't want people complaining about the jerk behind them with a 400mm lens sticking past their ear. And, of course, part of it is concern over the images. All major sports leagues as well as the NCAA own copyright on the IMAGES of the players meaning you can't use their images for any non-journalistic reason. They want to make all the money off that stuff.

Now, if you look at the website for whatever venue you're going to, they probably have a stated policy. Let me warn you - it's likely vague enough that it's up to the discretion of the ushers/security. I had NO issues taking a 20D with battery grip and 100-400mm lens to a Cleveland Indians game earlier this year. Last year when I brought my 20d and 70-200mm 2.8 lens to a Cavs game one of the security guys stopped me in the building (the usher didn't care when he took my ticket) and asked me if the lens was less than 6" - I dutifully told him it was and he let me go. I've followed plenty of posts on another site regarding the topic and people's experiences in other cities and it's roughly the same - some places don't care, other's depend on the security guard and still others have a very strict policy (and people in these discussions indicated they were told to take the camera back to the car). In the end, I would never plan on bringing your camera to any event unless you were comfortable with the possibility of being told you have to return it to your car.

Not sure that helps you much - but I don't think you're going to find a concrete yes/no answer.
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Old Jan 12, 2007, 7:47 PM   #4
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Aalphabet wrote:
Quote:
Good day -

-- Has anyone had any problems entering an 'event' or show or ? with their camera?

-- I had read that some people were having problems because their camera looked 'professional' - ?

-- Now I have a single concrete example. The threshold for this one facility is - if the camera has a "removeable lens" you cannot bring it into the facility, regardless of the type of event / show.

-- I do not know if this is a -security- issue oran issueof them worrying about you -selling- photos you took at their event / show.

-- I am selling my D1x and getting a smaller, lesser, camera as I am having problems with my hands, my eyes, walking,etc and this will be used as a big point-n-shoot camera (with more functions).

-- I was considering the Nikon D40 (new lenses dammit), D50, Oly E500, Pentax K100 (all with an 18-200 or 28-300 for my big point-n-shoot)- all have 'removeable' lenses - and that might be a problem. So I moved to considering the Fuji S9100 (for the liveLCD for me).

-- If anyone has any experience with being refused entry, or has heard anything - that might impact what camera a lot of people consider.

Any input is appreciated. Thank you.
Absolutely...no cameras at all with detachable lenses are allowed into Texas Stadium here in Dallas, and the last time I tried taking a camera into America Airlines Arena to a Dallas Stars NHLGame I was given a lot of embarrasinggrief.For that reason alone I've not been to an NFL, NBA or NHL game for quite a while now.The Big 12 conference has a conference-wide rule against "longer" lenses to the point I don't even try. Set all that against the Texas Rangers baseball club that will let you bring any bag with any lensesin as long as it will fit under your chair, and the last time I went to Wrigley Field in Chicago I had no issues.

The funny thing is, they also make a big deal about "no movie cameras", yet they let people in with digicams, some with big 10X zoomlenses that zoom to over 350mm equivalent focal lengths,that can shoot great movies. Bunch of idiots. I've considered buying a camera like the Canon S3IS to get by the security issue, but to be honest, if they want to have rules like that, someone else can buy my ticket. Most of them are too darn expensive anyway.
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Old Jan 13, 2007, 2:20 PM   #5
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I once visited an art museum where they didn't allow digital cameras. Film cameras were ok. :O For example I could get a good semi-professional film camera into the museum but not an inexpensive digital camera. I found that policy quite stupid and later wrote an e-mail to them telling so in polite words.

But then again, it depends on the place. I visited a different art museum and cameras were allowed.
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Old Jan 13, 2007, 4:09 PM   #6
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These kinds of threads tend to popup pretty often in various photography forums.

Usually, they're started by someone that was not allowed to take photos at a given location.

If it's private properly, they can set any rules they want to regarding photography.

Heck, I was just refused entry with a camera at a Gun Show last weekend. The show promoter didn't want them there. I had a friendly chat with him about it (after checking my camera with security) and he said it upset the exhibitors. I've brought pocket cameras to the same promoter's shows in the past and not a word was said when I took some photos inside of the show.

But, this time, I was denied entry with a larger camera. I checked it in with security (a police officer in this case), and it was tagged and returned to me when I left with no issues.

I've had the same thing happen to me at concerts in the past. I was at a concert a while back at a club in Hilton Head. The promotor (or rather the bouncer at the door) did not want to let me in with my camera. Yet, people with other cameras were there. They probably wanted to make sure that nobody got good enough photos to market, and the bouncer at the door was making the judgement call about what did and did not get in. lol

At a couple of local restaurants in my area with like music, cameras tend to be frowned upon, too. It's probably because the patrons complain when they have their picture taken (or the owners don't want to get any complaints). But, I had a chat with the owner at one of them and they said it was OK to use a camera as long as I didn't use a flash. It's private property, and I have to abide by their rules.

I've had the same thing happen at malls, grocery stores, and more. If they tell me I can't have a camera or take photos, I abide by their rules (although I may try to convince them to make an exception). lol



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Old Jan 13, 2007, 5:52 PM   #7
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It is true that each venue sets its own rules and policies. I've had no issues in Great American Ballpark (Cincinnati), The RCA Dome (Indy), or either stadium in Philly. I always make it a point to call ahead and ask the policy, and also to bring in the smallest bag i can to not attract attention (although I openly show it to the security guards. The best bet is to be up front and honest, and be as polite as possible.
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Old Feb 9, 2007, 11:20 AM   #8
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Each venue makes it's own rules so the call ahead suggestion is a good one. I'll share my experience(s) which could also be construed as a gripe againstone art museum.

I've taken pictures in the Alte Pinakothek, the Neue Pinakothek (both Munich), the Rijksmuseum (Amsterdam), the Scottish National Gallery (Edinburgh) and regional art museums throughout Europe. I haven't been there but photos are allowed in the Louvre except in two areas. The rules are simple, no flash, no tripod,don't disturb others, enjoy. On the other hand the Figge Art Museum, Davenport, IA does not allowcameras of any kind in the museum, allegedly for security reasons.

The Figge is a decent regional museum containing a number Grant Woods works, collections representing Carribean, Mexican and South American art that may not be well represented elsewhere. However, I will not darken their doors again until they institute a more rational policy.
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Old Feb 9, 2007, 11:32 AM   #9
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In Seattle, Washington, you can take "non-professional looking" cameras into the Key Arena (NBA), and you can take almost any camera into Safeco Field (MLB).
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Old Feb 9, 2007, 6:09 PM   #10
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As an actively performing musician, I can add that the use of flash is very distracting, and even debilitating, in the sense that the pupils react by restricting very quickly and dilating back to the level appropriate to ambient light in a more leisurely fashion. Photographers should respect other artists enough not to inhibit a musical performance, or for that matter, to photograph paintings, sculpture, pottery, tapestries, etc. in a manner that could be seen as an infringement on the right of the artist tocollect appropriate fees for his/her work, but also to maintain creative control of their creation.
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