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Old Jul 16, 2002, 12:37 PM   #1
dj
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Default wide angle lense

I like to buy a digital camera. Is there a brand/s which offers a digital camera that has a built in wide angle lense, or a multi format digital camera that offers this feature?

Thanks

[Edited on 7-16-2002 by dj]
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Old Jul 16, 2002, 4:10 PM   #2
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How wide is wide for you? 28mm equivalent? Wider? What do you mean by multi format? Do you mean like APS film cameras which is nothing more than cropping the negative when prints are made or do you mean a zoom lens?
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Old Jul 17, 2002, 8:15 AM   #3
dj
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Default wide angle

Padeye,

thanks for the reply!,
Honestly, Now i realize i need learn how wide is 28mm compared to other ranges.
As for the multi-format camera question, what i meant was a camera that can do everything, from macro zoom, wide angle, and zoom, all in moderation of course, I think i may be asking for too much. A one stop shopping digtial camera. Currently I have a Olympus IS-20 I like its capabilites, then I discovered the latest version has a wide angle mode. with mine I'd have to remove the lense to achive that. So I'm looking for a digital camera that can give me all in one features.

The camera brand/models you listed, are they suitable for my needs?

Thanks so much!
dj
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Old Jul 17, 2002, 5:56 PM   #4
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Okay, we're getting closer but we'll need more information to get the right camera for you. You didn't day what you're using the final output for but I'll throw out the first pitch and say that a 2.1mp camera would probably be adequate. You'd be able to make good color injet prints up to 8x10 and be more than adequate for B&W newsprint ads and web use.

All those "formats" are commonly available without having to swap lenses. There are digicams with interchangable lenses but they are very pricey. A typical digicam 3x zoom lens would be the equivalent of a 35mm (moderate wide angle) to 105mm (moderate telphoto) in a 35mm film camera. Many have a macro focus mode which is just another way of saying closeup. True macro is not available in any consumer digicam I'm aware of but you'll probably have sufficient closeup ability for your needs.

I think the Canon A series would suit your needs well. I've got the A10 but the A30 and A40 have the same ease of use with some extra features. They use standard AA batteries so you can get modestly priced NiMH batteries and a quick charger at your local Target or Wal-Mart. Do not waste your money on Alkaline batteries with a digicam as life is very short.

The wide angle may be insufficient if you're shooting interiors and don't have any room to back up. There are a couple of ways around this. Canon makes a wide angle adapter lens that threads on to the camera body with an adapter. It will cost around $130 with the adaper and will give you the equivalent of a 24.5mm lens which is fairly wide. The camera also has a feature to assist you in shooting images to stitch into a panorama with included software. I use this a fair amount and it works quite well. If I'm careful to keep the camera vertical when I take the shots they go together seamlessly.

About the only shortcoming I can see is that the little built in flash may be insufficient if you're shooting big interiors. You could get a more complex camera that can take an add-on flash or go the cheap route and shoot on a tripod with long shutter speeds

I hesitate to give you figures like angles of view as they will be abstract to you. Go to a store and try out a few cameras to get a feel for what you see in the viewfinder.
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Old Jul 19, 2002, 12:24 PM   #5
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Padeye,

Thanks again, I sincerely appreciate your knowledge and advice, and the time to read and reply to my posts.

The type of pictures i like to shoot using a wide angle are landscape/scenic and portraits, and the occasional full room shot. With my current camera I have to back up as far as I can, but lose detail or the original shot i started out seeing.

I'll lookin into the camera you've mentioned and see what looks good through the view finder.

Thanks again!
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Old Jul 19, 2002, 2:42 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally posted by djThe type of pictures i like to shoot using a wide angle are landscape/scenic and portraits, and the occasional full room shot. With my current camera I have to back up as far as I can, but lose detail or the original shot i started out seeing.
That's a tradeoff. If you see more area in a bitmap image of the same size you cannot have the same level of detail. You can make the bitmap larger so detail is still retained or get closer and see less area. The alternative is to make composites of several closeups or panoramas. A panorama is often too wide to display on a computer but if the viewer only has to scroll side to side it isn't so bad as viewing a bitmap that;s oversize in both dimensions.
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Old Jul 19, 2002, 3:10 PM   #7
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I believe the fisheye lens on 35mm was about 24mm, big trade off, distored round. try to buy the cam as close to what you want. add on lens tend to cost alot and do not seem to give the same quality as the standard lens, some even require cropping after.
Gary
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Old Jul 19, 2002, 6:16 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally posted by Gary Senkus
I believe the fisheye lens on 35mm was about 24mm, big trade off, distored round.
A 24mm lens on a 35mm camers isn't even considered super wide angle and I am not aware of any that aren't rectilinear beyond a small amount of barrel distortion. I've got a 24mm Nikkor and it does not distort. Full frame fisheyes are typically 15-16mm but there are rectilinear lenses in that focal length range as well. Full circle fisheyes which print a circular 180 view totally within the frame are typically 8mm.


dj - so as not to add confusion rectilinear means that straight lines in the scene end up as straight lines in the image. Angles may be exxagerated because of the wide angle of view but that is not considered distortion as it is optically correct. Barrel distortion is when lines bulge outward from the center of the image. Fisheye lenses take this to an extreme to show a wider field of view on a flat image than is possible with a rectilinear lens.
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