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Old Feb 2, 2007, 10:48 AM   #11
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I agree, it would be a very helpfull number to have when you are trying to buy or sell a used body.
Or even a new body that a store may have been using as a display sampler.
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Old Feb 2, 2007, 1:31 PM   #12
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Why are you looking for this information? If it is to determine the amount of use a used camera has had (and thereby its value or potential life) as a number of folks have assumed you're looking for pretty useless information IMHO. The environment the camera was used in and the care the user has taken with the camera are far more important than a raw number indicating the number of times the shutter release has been pressed. I'll modify this opinion slightly since we're talking DSLRs here with many more moving parts than the average digital camera.

In checking a used camera I'd look for evidence that the camera has been in dusty or salty environment and I'd look for signs of physical abuse such as dents and abrasions. Dust in-between the lens elements internally in the pentaprism housing would be a sure sign of a dusty environment as any corrosion at all on metal parts would indicate a salt air or chemically corrosive environment. Avoid. Look for wear patterns the camera's frequently used controls such as shutter, focusing, zoom and menu controls. I would not buy any modern camera that showed any of these characteristics. Finally take pictures with the camera. If the pictures are decent, march on.

I would not buy any used camera without an oportunity to do this kind of an examination or I had an enforceable money-back guarantee with a sufficient time period to do these examinnations/tests.
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Old Feb 2, 2007, 3:02 PM   #13
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Yes absolutely, the condition it is in and the way it was kept/maintained is very important :!:

But for a DSLR so is the shutter cycle count, a 20D has an expected shutter life of around 70k cycles. A 30d expects to make around 100K cycles. (dReble is around 50K) all approximate of course.

You can find a pristine looking 20D, but if has cycle count of 60,000 it will not last long before needing to visit Canon for a shutter/mirror box replacement. (about 250$ repair).

The number of times the shutter button is pressed on a DSLR roughly indicates how much life is left in the body :idea:

This is very different from point&shoots which do not have a mechaninal shutter/mirror box.
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Old Feb 2, 2007, 4:29 PM   #14
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Noted. I did caveat DSLRs. Aircraft engines have a rated TBO also which is based testing using an FAA mandated power cycle. In real life a lot of engines don't make the rated TBO and some excede the TBO by a good margin. All depends on the real life usage patterns and environment conditions. Beyond that we have to realize that even if the usage pattern exactly matched the test program the number quoted is a mean. Operational hours is just the start point for inspection to determine the condition.

I'd be real surpised if any cameramanufacturer put a shutter fired counter in the firmware unless they based the warranty on that number or had a specific maintenance program based on shutter trips. No incentive.
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Old Feb 8, 2007, 7:33 AM   #15
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I don't think having cameras that could indicate how many exposures have been taken would necessarily be a good thing. It doesn't work with car odometers as dealers have ways of turning back the clock. I assume second hand camera dealers etc would find ways of turning back the camera's exposure counter.

With most second hand cameras, I look for wear and tear on the camera itself.
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