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Old Jul 7, 2003, 4:18 PM   #11
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Eric S:

I am definitely with you - this forum is great, the only one I regularly read and find answers to many of my questions so I do not have to post them and have all these knowledgable people think I am a complete dummy.

Many years ago I had a picture restored for my mother - it was an expensive ordeal and the picture did not come out too good. Recently I scanned it in, played with it quite a bit, and now have 1 I am proud to display - of course this took quite a lot of time.

I have a picture of my mother in her baby carriage that was taken in 1904 (she is in the Guiness Book of World Records as the oldest to have a baby, me). I am doing a lot of playing with it and so far have not had as much luck as I would like. But since I probably have every photo software there is and plug-ins I will come up with a very good picture.

If your pictures have "tears" and "scratches" Digital Image Pro 7 has a great utility for taking care of that without having to do any cloning.

As far as how to print, "Glossy or not. Sepia or regular gray scale", I always like to print on either glossy or Kodak Soft Gloss and if the picture is worth all the trouble you are going to to get it right, print it both sepia and B/W and then make your decision. If done well you will probably like both.

What I am trying to do is: A lot of the pictures taken with my Sony Mavica (now using Olympus D40) of my granddaughter came out blackish/red and this is not an acceptable skin tone. When I manage to correct the skin tone the rest of the picture prints out green, blue and every other color of the rainbow.

In case you are curious as to why I have so much software, email me and I will tell you.

Marian (Frosty was a West Highland Terrier)
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Old Jul 8, 2003, 1:47 AM   #12
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One of the most important tools you'll have to get to know in your editing program is the clone tool. It's the best tool for fixing damage in a picture. This was one of my early attempts of fixing major damage in a picture:

http://www.pbase.com/image/7198527
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Old Jul 8, 2003, 7:49 AM   #13
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Mike_PEAT

Now that is amazing. You turned that huge fold into... a little crease, and the burnt part is gone (talk about nice useful cloning.)

Frosty

In PS, you could try to use the magic wand tool to select only the people, and then alter the red and green color channels

I agree on the ways to print it. We had a 30-year-old picture fixed up by a photography friend who printed it about... 6 ways. We ended up taking 3 and giving away two as presents instead of just one. It was of my girlfriend (age 2) and her sister (age 8), giving each other a huge hug. Very cute.

Eric
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Old Jul 8, 2003, 8:17 AM   #14
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If someone can tell me how to insert a picture in here I would like to show you what I have done correcting a very old old picture.[/img][/list]
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Old Jul 8, 2003, 9:20 AM   #15
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Two possible ways, one way is to post it on another site and have a link to it (the preferable way) like my PBase link.

The other way is to have some web space and use the Img tags like:

(img)http://website.url/directory/image.jpg(/img)

you'll have to replace the round brackets () with sqaure ones [] to make it work (I couldn't show you otherwise).

The thing is try to keep it below 150K for those who dial up, and 800x600 or less. If you try to post 1 meg picture you will get a lot of angry people emailing you.
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Old Jul 8, 2003, 9:28 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eric s
Now that is amazing. You turned that huge fold into... a little crease, and the burnt part is gone (talk about nice useful cloning.)
If you look at the photograph from proper viewing distance, you don't notice the crease...I did say it was one of my early attempts, and that was a lot of damage. I use it as an example of what is possible (especially since it goes through the face). The person I did it for was more than satisfied...it was, "what the heck, let me see what I can do with it."

I could improve it more today, but I want it left as is...I think it says more for those who haven't done it before to see what is possible.
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Old Jul 8, 2003, 2:49 PM   #17
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Concerning calibration and picture.
The picture LOOKS allright, but indeed there is a slight yellow tint to it, but I cannot believe someone will see that without knowledge were to look.

Most digital camera's have a slight abnormality in green which shifts it's primary ever so slightly towards yellow, also on this picture you can see the green is VERY natural but not exactly, but I for one would not chance a thing.

Some companies deliver software for calibration, I don't know how that works, sorry I only use anlyzers, some people use kodak charts to compare but I firmly believe that calibration with your eyes is a lost cause unless there are some real problems, most of the time the D6500 option on your monitor is very close.

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Jul 9, 2003, 7:13 PM   #18
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there is a program for calibrating colors called displaymate. www.displaymate.com. there is a demo you can get or buy the full version for all the features. This is what the pro's use to calibrate monitors, tv, projectors etc with software
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Old Jul 10, 2003, 10:58 PM   #19
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A note on monitor calibration.

I don't think it is wise to have more than one calibrater running at one time.

I have some software that came with my Video card, 3deep. I've been using it to calibrate my monitor until quite recently. I was also using the builtin monitor gamma correction tool in PSP 7. Now here's where it got strange. I switched to PSP 8 and got different gamma completely. It was too bad that it took me so long to notice this. I scanned about 50 photos and had long known that my Microtek had a very narrow histogram. So I edited all my scans to look the best using levels and histogram adjustments. Now I have found that either PSP 7 or PSP 8 doesn't work with 3Deep.

I still can't figure out what the best setting is. I am still using 3deep to set the manual gamma wheel on my monitor, and it is giving a much more accurate look to photos. If I use 3deep to calibrate my monitor, it comes out much brighter. As far as I can tell I have the right setting because this web page's background is black, and the address bar is white. That photo looked pretty accurate with levels. Good shot by the way!

Now all I have to do is get PSP 8 correct. I think it's pretty accurate, but I just don't know after this whole 3deep thing.

Dan O.
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