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Old Jul 5, 2003, 1:28 PM   #1
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Default Monitor Calibration

Not sure which forum to post this on so decided this would be the best place.

I would like to calibrate my monitor so that what I see is what I get when printed. I have many, many different profiles that I can use but they too would all be with trial and error.

Wonder if anyone can help or else tell me how to calibrate it correctly. I have looked at a couple of sites with instructions but frankly I do not understand what they are talking about.

All input and help appreciated.

Thanks
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Old Jul 5, 2003, 2:56 PM   #2
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Hi,

To do it correctly you will need a coloranalyzer of some sort.
Try to find a ISF tech in your neighbourhood they know best how to calibrate your system.

I'm a ISF calibrator myself and I can't stress how important calibration is for any display.

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Jul 5, 2003, 3:33 PM   #3
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Thanks, but is there a way I can do this myself?
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Old Jul 6, 2003, 10:58 AM   #4
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To do it correctly now, you will need an color analyzer.
For the monitor setup's there are some cheap solutions out there, just google for Color analyzer + photo + monitor.

I use a spectrum radio meter but that's a very expensive piece of equiptment. A gell meter should be well enough for CRT based display's.

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Jul 6, 2003, 12:24 PM   #5
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The question is, how serious are you about calibration? Is close close enough? Or are you willing to spend a few hundred dollars on a fulltime colour analyzer that attaches to the front of your monitor and continually adjusts the settings?
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Old Jul 6, 2003, 1:04 PM   #6
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Just need it close enough so that I can see what is actually going to come out of my printer. Right now I am doing a lot of editing and printing until I get the desired results.

All I really want to do is adjust the photos and print them, ONCE. But they have to be good quality or the price of the camera is not worth it.

When the photos look "great" on the monitor they print terrible - when they look awful on the monitor they print near what I am looking for.

I have many photo editing programs and many color profiles - just need them to get to work together.

Thanks for any help you can offer.
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Old Jul 6, 2003, 1:59 PM   #7
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Frank: interesting, what do you think about the MonacoEZcolors Optix meter? Do you have any experience with it?

and do you think that



is yellow?

I have calibrated my monitor with the Optix meter, and i dont think it is "yellowish", not any more than one would expect at least. But some guys taunt me because they say it is yellowish. Of course its subjective too....
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Old Jul 6, 2003, 8:58 PM   #8
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LCohen

Doesn't look yellowish to me. And if you really meant it when you say they "taunted" you about it being yellowishÖ well, you have just gained insight into who they really are. If it were me, I would stop sharing pictures with them... and would probably stop spending time around/with them.

Frosty
Getting your monitor to represent color "correctly" is very hard, without dedicated hardware (as mentioned above.) I might even say that its basically luck. You can get close, as stated above, but "correct" is really hard. There are whole sections of forums dedicated to the topic in the more "pro" oriented web sites. I've put some links at the bottom of this post.

What you want to do is even harder than just calibrating your monitor. How your printer works is the opposite of how your monitor works. Your printer takes a white sheet of paper and mixes colors to get black. Your monitor starts with black and mixes colors to get while.

You havenít said if you are using a Mac or PC. Modern Apple OSís support color profiles in the OS (and every correctly written software package supports it.) Windows does not, and therefor the software must support it on their own. Not everything does.

If you are not willing to spend money on a Spyder or other colorometer (sp?) system, this is what I would do:

1) Find a picture of a color chart on the web.
2) Download it.
3) Load it into your favorite editing package.
4) If supported (PS does) make sure the editor is set to the proper color space and is using no color profile.
5) Make sure the printer is set to the same settings you normally use, including color space and profile (if you have them and if they are supported.) Make sure you are using the same paper you always use, and the same inks.
6) Print it.
7) If itís an ink jet, let it dry. Depending on the paper and inks, this can be very quick or take a while (an hour or more, I believe.)
8) Compare the print out with the monitor.
9) Now you need to make a profile which will let you turn what is on your monitor into what is on the print out. I don't know how to make a profile without the proper software. I believe PS 7 lets you make a profile yourself, but I don't know for sure.... If it does, I bet only the full version (not LE or Elements.) If you can't make a profile for your monitor to match it to your printer... well... then you'll have to find some software that will do it.

If anyone has a correction to that list of steps, please give them! I have read about this stuff, but Iíve never done it!

Technically, you should redo this every time you change types of inks or paper.

There are also people you can pay who will do this all for you and give you the profile. Of course, it costs around $100USD (at least around here.) How you find them, I donít know. You might ask in a local camera shop that caters to the Professional crowd.

Here are some links that you should check out:
http://www.robgalbraith.com/ubbthrea...at=&Board=UBB3

Nuts, I have more links at work, but not here. Iíll add stuff to this thread tomorrow.

Eric
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Old Jul 7, 2003, 7:31 AM   #9
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You guys are GREAT - and helpful too. :lol:

Think I have found a solution -

Am doing some layering editing in PS7 and then using a program called ColorPilot for additional "fine tuning" and did find some settings for my printer driver that have helped. I admit that this too is a lot of work and some trial-and-error have turned out more than passable. Once I get through the few thousand pictures I have to work on it will be much easier because I will only have to do the "new" ones (quite a few less).

Next Question:

Any suggestions as to restoring some very old pictures (over 100 years old)? I am scanning them.

My ultimate goal with all these pictures is to be able to make photo albums of the family - we are now 5 generations - and keep the memories going as well as adding new ones.


One More New Subject

If any of you are interested in 9/11 pictures taken from my balcony (not published but similar) just e-mail me with your forum name.
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Old Jul 7, 2003, 3:43 PM   #10
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This forum is great, isn't it? I've found answers to questions I never would have thought of without the input of this group.

Glad you found a solution, even if it's isn't a great one.

I've had work done on a 35-year-old picture. It was scanned into a computer using a good home flatbed scanner. From there, it was loaded into PS and levels were played with (along with a little cloning to take care of a tear.) Then the question was how to print them out... Glossy or not. Sepia or regular gray scale. That kinda stuff.

What are you trying to do which is giving you trouble... or are you asking about something you will do (and therefor haven't hit a problem yet.) Good luck on the project that is a great idea!

Eric
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