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Old Jan 30, 2007, 9:09 AM   #1
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Over the weekend I was hiking along a snow covered trail which runs alongside a series of waterfalls. I wanted to slow down the shutter enough so that the water looked like it was moving. But, when I did this, obviously the image sensor was then obsorbing too much light. I tried to compensate by taking the aperature to F8 and then I set the ISO to 50. But, ataround 1/40 second, it was still too bright. What do you do in a situation like this? Is this where filters come in handy? I've never used filters before. BTW, the camera in question is a PS Canon A520.
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Old Jan 30, 2007, 9:46 AM   #2
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I think what you want would be a neutral density filter.

Another approach to try might be, assuming you are working off a tripod, to take multiple exposures and combine them after in photoshop (or other software).


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Old Jan 30, 2007, 9:59 AM   #3
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Contriver wrote:
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Over the weekend I was hiking along a snow covered trail which runs alongside a series of waterfalls. I wanted to slow down the shutter enough so that the water looked like it was moving. But, when I did this, obviously the image sensor was then obsorbing too much light. I tried to compensate by taking the aperature to F8 and then I set the ISO to 50. But, ataround 1/40 second, it was still too bright. What do you do in a situation like this? Is this where filters come in handy? I've never used filters before. BTW, the camera in question is a PS Canon A520.
This is what a neutral density filter is made for. However, before you buy one, you should be able to close the aperture down much more to f/22 or f/32. That's the first way to block out light, and it will make focusing much easier since the DOF will be huge. Setting the ISO as low as you can is also smart but I think you've maxed that out at ISO50.

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Old Jan 30, 2007, 10:48 AM   #4
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fortson wrote:
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This is what a neutral density filter is made for. However, before you buy one, you should be able to close the aperture down much more to f/22 or f/32. That's the first way to block out light, and it will make focusing much easier since the DOF will be huge. Setting the ISO as low as you can is also smart but I think you've maxed that out at ISO50.
Unfortunately, this particular camera (PS Canon A520) has a smallest fstop of f8, so no joy. Even if it had smaller fstops, the refraction would probably make the image unacceptably soft.

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Old Jan 30, 2007, 5:48 PM   #5
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Norm in Fujino wrote:
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Unfortunately, this particular camera (PS Canon A520) has a smallest fstop of f8, so no joy. Even if it had smaller fstops, the refraction would probably make the image unacceptably soft.
Wow! I had no idea it was like that. Then ignore what I said and buy the ND filter.

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Old Feb 1, 2007, 2:30 PM   #6
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Can you frame the shot or choose a view using more optical zoom? That will make the f/stop smaller.

Digital camera hints:

http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/digicam.htm


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Old Feb 1, 2007, 2:35 PM   #7
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ajaynejr wrote:
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Can you frame the shot or choose a view using more optical zoom? That will make the f/stop smaller.
nice idea, but if the camera only goes to f8 (as stated above) and the OP already closed down to f8 then changing zoom won't help.

The question is - can you get an ND filter for a digicam?
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Old Feb 1, 2007, 6:55 PM   #8
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The question is - can you get an ND filter for a digicam?
Yeah, you can, first you have to purchase the LA-DC52F adapter from Canon - it's around $20, and I think Lensmate has one also- and then you can purchase filters.
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Old Feb 1, 2007, 7:05 PM   #9
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Why not use your exposure compensation. It free and already built right into your camera. I like free things.

MT/Sarah
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Old Feb 1, 2007, 7:35 PM   #10
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mtclimber wrote:
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Why not use your exposure compensation. It free and already built right into your camera. I like free things.

MT/Sarah
Exposure compensation has to change something - either shutter speed or aperture. If aperture is already as narrow as the camera allows and you don't want a faster shutter speed, EC won't work.
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