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Old Mar 2, 2007, 3:25 PM   #21
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Corpsy wrote:
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****Can i add photos to a non-rewritable disc? For example, one session i put 200 photos onto a non-rewritable DVD. A month later, can I use that same disc again and add another 200 pics? I have this CD-R mind-set that is it one session and then it is 'sealed' and done. Is that right or wrong or what?
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Yes, Reanimator and Slipe have already said as much. It's just an option you select when you begin to burn a disc. When you put the disc in next and start up Nero it will read the disc, show the folders and files, and let you know how much space you have left.
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****************OK. Thanks. I'm kind of slow and have to be told the same thing several times and in several different ways! ;-) Looks like i need to fire up Nero and play with it/get familiar with it. Do you have some newbie tips for Nero? Not all it capabilities - you know what I'm wanting to do with it.
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Two copies are better than one, but store them separately. Just keep in mind that all optical discs will wear out over time no matter how carefully you store them, so even if you burned 20 copies, if they are not high quality discs they will likely all be bad in 40 years (or sooner). Even high quality discs won't last forever.
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*********Good point. I'm 43 so the 40 year disc would probably out live me. I don't know. I'm not storing the secrets of the universe or anything profound like that! I imagine if 100 photos out live me (out of the thousands upon thousands that i take) that will be more than enough.
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External usb hard drives are available and they're not too expensive. There are also external cases that you can put internal hard drives into and read via usb.
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*********That sounds cool. But, what about the life expectancy of one of these external USB HD's? If it is less than 40 years, i might as will just stick with two copies, stored in different locations on DVD's.
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Thanks again!
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Old Mar 2, 2007, 3:59 PM   #22
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With the new generation of long life write once CF cards the need to burn to another media should go away.
http://www.dpreview.com/news/0702/07...eonceflash.asp

Sorry about link to dpreview, could not find similar on steves.

This concept has me ROTFL :whack: :? :whack: :?
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Old Mar 5, 2007, 2:59 AM   #23
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What is your special utility called? I didn't know that i would need such a thing. UGH. The learning curve continues to be steep!
I currently use this: http://nero-cd-dvd-speed.en.softonic...eenshots/22230 It isn't necessary and you just want to use it to find the best recording speed for a particular batch of media – not test each burn. I see so many people report that their CDs have failed over time and I'm very glad I work on my error rate. I've been burning CDs since 2X was the latest and greatest and have yet to have a CD fail that worked when I burned it.

The Nero data verification that Corpsy mentioned is usually sufficient to know you got a good burn. I like to spot check some of the images though.

Something I find really helps finding photos on CDs and DVDs is to make a thumbnail HTML file of the photos on the disk and put them in a folder with the same name as the CD or DVD. That stays on the hard drive so I can look through my CDs if I'm not sure which one an image is on. I have Irfanview thumbnails make the HTML file of everything in the burn. I increase the size of the thumbnails so I can see them better. If you do that make sure to tell Irfanview to not include the originals in the file and it will be quite small – maybe a Mb or so.

You might want to read this: http://www.cdrinfo.com/Sections/Revi...4&PageId=6 Basically it says that –R DVDs are a lot more compatible with other players than +R. –R is also more compatible than –RW. So if you get a new computer you will have a much higher chance of being able to read DVDs recorded in –R. Since you have a choice you should probably use DVD –R. Dual layer DVDs are I think all +R. I haven't seen anything on their compatibility but would guess they are also less compatible.

From what is available in stores your best bet for brands is probably Verbatim Data Life DVDs. They use a longer lasting Azo dye and are all made by the parent company, Mitsubishi Chemicals . Many brand name DVDs are farmed out to companies like Ritek or CMC. Taiyo Yuden discs are excellent quality also but the cyanine dye isn't quite as long lasting. Most Sony and Fuji disks with "Made in Japan" on them are made by Taiyo Yuden and are also excellent quality.

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What do you mean? What is meant by a 'session'?
When you set Nero up to write multi-session you can read what you already wrote to the DVD, but can put the DVD back in the recorder and write another session.

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Really? If i burn photos to a CD-r via EX then i can always add more photos later? I thought once the PC spit out the disc at the end of the burn session that it was a closed deal and that nothing more could be added.
CDs I've written with the XP recorder have automatically been multi-session. I put the CD back in the recorder and can add more stuff later in another session. I've never even seen a choice to close the disk with the XP recorder, and there is no reason to do that with data.

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But, you are saying that RW's will not work to archieve photos?
They work fine. But the media isn't considered as reliable for long term storage. Besides, "archive" means storage – why would you want to pay extra for RW to store something on.

RW is used mostly for packet writing, and that is really unreliable. It has some very good uses, but archive isn't one of them.

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Old Mar 5, 2007, 8:04 AM   #24
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Slipe and others - thank you very much for your time and attention. It has been quiteful helpful. I didn't have time to experiment this weekend but will feel more compentent the next do i try archieving some things.

Thanks again!
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Old Mar 5, 2007, 11:20 AM   #25
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I use dvd-r because they are more compatible with my dvd player, usually buy from costco when they have a 2 for 1 sale.

Which version of Nero are you using? There is usually a checkmark that you have to uncheck to make a multisesion disc.

I usually backup all my files on my pc so I can fill a dvd, I then don't have to remember which dvd I left open. Plus I have two copies of the photo, the original and the edited one so that is double the space(sometimes).

I avoid using Windows to do any kind of burning because it takes so long the first and last time I did it.
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Old Mar 5, 2007, 1:19 PM   #26
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Ah crap. . . My version of Nero was a 30 day trial version. Be careful what you buy off of Ebay!

What version of Nero do i need to get to be able to backup onto DVD-R?



Thanks.
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Old Mar 5, 2007, 1:26 PM   #27
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Any current version of Nero you buy in a store will burn DVDs. Version 7 is fine.

You might try one of these freeware recorders: http://www.snapfiles.com/freeware/gmm/fwcdburn.html

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Old Mar 5, 2007, 6:54 PM   #28
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Thanks Slipe. I have these already on my computer. Have any of you used any of these to back up pics to DVD's?

Corel Photo Downloader

Roxio - RecordNow

Roxio - My DVD Plus 6

Roxio - Creator Plus

HP Photosmart Essential

Imgburn

I don't mind trying your free dl - but if i have something that will already work, i'd like to go with that first.

With XP's recorder -does it have thatutility tool that checks the quality of the burn against the orginal? Some of you mentioned other software that does that (Nero for example). That sounds like a good thing to have! Maybe i'll break down and buy Nero or try the free dl that you mention above. Does it have the utility tool to check the burn against the orginal?


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Old Mar 5, 2007, 8:03 PM   #29
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RecordNow should do it for you.

But now I have a question. What is the mechanism by which a DVD degrades? I can understand continuous use, abuse, direct sunlight, extreme temperatures, immersion in salt water, extreme magnetic fields, bombardment with neutrons, etc. But archiving? If you burn a DVD full of pictures, and never view the pictures on it for, say 10 years, it won't work? Why not? If the DVD's sit on the shelf in a store for 10 years, they won't work? This may be true, and there may be a very good reason for it, but I can't understand why. Assuming I burn a DVD full of pictures (and check it to make sure the recording was successful), put it in a jewel case, put the case in a drawer in a temperature and humidity controlled environment, and leave it there for 10 years...what will happen? Some of the pictures will be unreadable? I won't be able to access the disk? The disk will evaporate? What?

My biggest fear is that the DVD will go by the way of the 8-track, and we won't be able to find a working player to stick our disks in.

the Hun


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Old Mar 5, 2007, 8:23 PM   #30
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From a Memorex whitepaper on the subject of cdr/dvd degradation.
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Optical discs, both CDs and DVDs, should easily reach the thirty-year mark and beyond if they are manufactured well and are stored properly. Contrary to popular belief, these discs do degrade over time under the effects of heat, humidity, internal chemical reactions, mechanical stresses, UV light,oxidation, and accumulated scratches.
[align=left]......[/align]
[align=left]
DVD+R/-R—claims are up to 100 years[/align]
[align=left]o Organic dyes—azo-cyanine, cyanine, and metal chelate dyes are used for the writeonce versions of DVD discs. These versions of dye have to react quickly to the application of the burning laser because the pit marks are very small and the disc speed is very quick.[/align]
[align=left]o Mirror layer—gold or silver alloy as in the CD-R. Environmental tests indicate that DVD recordable discs are far more sensitive to humidity than CD-Rs in terms of increases in error rates, but it is not clear yet if the humidity is affecting the dye, the mirror layer, the adhesive, or the mechanics of the polycarbonate.[/align]
[align=left]o Structure
The fragile recording layer and mirror layer are sandwiched between two halves of a
DVD disc. This offers better protection for these layers than that offered by CD-R and
CD-RW disc. On the other hand, the pit sizes are much smaller and the track pitch is
much narrower than that of the CD versions; so obstruction from scratches on the
bottom of the disc is more likely. The bonding agent between the two halves
introduces more questions about chemical stability. The hub area may or may not be
bonded together, and the lack of bonding will mean more care has to be taken when
inserting the discs in a protective case or a locking hub mechanism to prevent
cracking. Tilt, the measure of flatness of a disc, is more critical for DVDs than for
CDs.
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[/align]
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