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Old Jul 24, 2003, 1:54 PM   #21
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"Do you know of the gray scale chart that Boo refers to, or are you suggesting one which/should can be purchased? "..................

Checkout the NI website, there's a post from the moderator on how to generate profiles. They supply downloadable greyscale charts on their site. I'm just cautious that printing out might not give a linear result.

The alternative is put it on your monitor, capture with your cam at various ISO's and shutters, then make the profile files. Again here you'd need to be careful to set up the brightness/contrast of your monitor. But you can always use the PS eyedropper on the calibrated patches of your files and see if the grey values are about right and white and black is not clipped.
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Old Jul 24, 2003, 3:24 PM   #22
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Is it really that critical, I didn't think it was? The grey chart has areas of all sorts of greys and you take multiple samples from various tones to establish a noise pattern to base your profile on. The standard profiles you create are only a short cut help and in use I didn't get the feeling it would be that critical. I thought the idea was to use them on your monitor, not to print them - surely the printer may introduce it's own 'noise' ~ mine certainly would!!

I personally think you're better creating a custom profile for particular batches of photos at a given setting. Once you've done one, you can base all the photos from the same shoot (presuming they're on the same sort of settings) on that profile - after all it only takes two minutes to create a custom profile anyway, hardly any great inconvenience considering the benefits to the photo. Since I created my basic profiles I haven't used them as it is so quick to do a custom one.
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Old Jul 24, 2003, 5:08 PM   #23
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Boo

The problem with this method of working is that it assumes there is a place with no detail in my pictures. There almost never is a place with no detail for me. So the only solution (for me) is to carry a grey card and take a picture of that when I'm out (or take a picture with the lens cap on?) I don't own a grey card and I don't remember to take a picture with the cap on (at least I haven't yet.)

So doing basic profiles seems the logical fallback. It isn't perfect, but it seems to do a good job. I haven't tried the photoshop method steve6 suggested, but I will. I have a really noisy picture of a deer 1/2 hour past sunset which is a reall good test of noise reduction software.

Eric
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Old Jul 25, 2003, 8:45 AM   #24
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Boo......

Quote:
I thought the idea was to use them on your monitor, not to print them - surely the printer may introduce it's own 'noise' ~ mine certainly would!!
That's why you must defocus to remove any correlated 'noise' such as aliasing, and the monitor is strong on this.VOX
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Old Jul 25, 2003, 3:07 PM   #25
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I also have a C-730 that gets noisy with strong backlit photos (clouds, sky). I have found a fairly good way to eliminate or greatly reduce this noise in 8x10 prints in PhotShop Elements.

- Outline the area affected by noise with lasso tool
- Go to Filters, select Noise
- Select Median
- Enlarge the phot to 300%
- Move the slider bar just one or two tweaks to the right

I find that this procedure softens that portion of the image enough to reduce or eliminate the noise without much of a trade-off in the edge and detail sharpness. I've done this on up to three portions of a single photo of a sunrise over the ocean with wet sand in foreground with great results.
I hope this helps.
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Old Jul 27, 2003, 4:39 PM   #26
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I just tried to play with the filters->noise->median method ('cause I have elements.) If you can easily select portions of the pictures, it looks like it would produce good results. But if you can't, you're stuck. It really does a good job at removing detail if you do it over the entire picture. But it does remove noise as well.

I'm going to stick with neat image.

Eric
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Old Jul 27, 2003, 9:06 PM   #27
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new update today v2.6
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