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Old Mar 16, 2007, 9:09 AM   #21
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Good luck. Looks like the specs. should allow on-the-road editing. Our last buy, and probably our next buy, at work was the 465 core duo. You didn't mention what warranty you bought. My suggestion, if it's not too late is the 4 yr. on-site with the 4 yr. accidental add-in. I think this would give you peace of mind while actually travelling. The accidental warranty even covers mortar fiire. We had one knocked offa desk due to a mortarhit on the building. The Gateway tech's first question was "Is the user OK?" We answered yes. His reply was "Whew, good, we can fix the computer." We had to send it toGateway but that wasn't an issue as we had already swapped computers with the user.
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Old Mar 20, 2007, 5:25 PM   #22
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I have always had, and will always continue to use Macs. It might just be a personal thing, but to my mind they are one of the safest and most stable of Operating Systems. Vista is still a very new OS and will continue to have bugs for the next few months or so. Apple has gone from strength to strength with it's OSX and to my mind Windows will always be playing catch-up. I am currently the proud owner of a G5 iMac (Dual Core) I also use an old G3 iBook for all my Camera work. Small, portable, fast enough for photo's and just so much easier to use. If they do go wrong, which is very rare, I just sort it out myself. No need to re-configure or re-install drivers, they are all there. Yes, I am biased, but I know what I like, and like what I know.........
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Old Mar 20, 2007, 5:41 PM   #23
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Or, even better, Linux. ;-)

I run my PC in a triboot configuration, so that I can select from Windows XP Pro, SimplyMEPIS 6.0 Final, or SimplyMEPIS 6.5 Release Candidate 2 at bootup.

My wife is running on a laptop that I bought off of Ebay for $112 about 2 years ago.

It's got an Intel i440BX chipset using an Intel 300mhz Pentium II Mobile CPU with 256MB of RAM in it.

I've got SimplyMEPIS 6.0-4 Beta 4 (a test release) installed on her laptop now, and I have no plans to upgrade it (it's running super with this one). lol I have been updating my desktop to later betas and test releases though (it's got more in the way of resources to work with).

Before that, I ran a SimplyMEPIS 3.4.2 Release Candiate (beta, not final release) for many months.

Before that, I ran SimplyMEPIS 3.3 on it. All worked great. With the older 3.3 version, I could run Firefox, Open Office and even the GIMP in 64MB of RAM (all at the same time) with a swap partition for virtual memory.

Here's a downsized screen shot of it running the newer 6.0-4 Beta 4 (I installed it around the first of last month as an upgrade to the older SimplyMEPIS 3.4.2 test release she's been running for a number of months).

I was so impressed I saved a screen from it with a utility running that displays CPU Type/Speed, RAM and swap space used.

It's only using 99MB of RAM (with no swap space), with Firefox 2.0 running Flash 9 Player content from our ISP's home page.

That's amazing for a modern operating system with it's nice desktop and feature set (with loads of free software pre-installed, including image managers and editors, all of the Open Office Suite, and much more).

I've even got applets running for Weather, applets notifying me of updates, a firewall, spam filter and lots more that's loaded and still running fine in this little RAM without even touching the disk for virtual memory (and it's got space it can use to that on a PC with less resources) on an old PII based laptop.




SimplyMEPIS 6.0-4 Beta 4 will run in 69MB (without touching the disk for swap space) without Firefox 2.0 and Flash Player 9 running, and would run in a lot less if I'd get rid of all the stuff I've got loading at bootup. lol

It's been a pretty good laptop for $112 so far. But, then again, she's only been using it for a couple of years. :-) The operating sytem and applicatons I run on it are free.


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Old Mar 20, 2007, 10:00 PM   #24
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bootybandy wrote:
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I have always had, and will always continue to use Macs. It might just be a personal thing, but to my mind they are one of the safest and most stable of Operating Systems. Vista is still a very new OS and will continue to have bugs for the next few months or so. Apple has gone from strength to strength with it's OSX and to my mind Windows will always be playing catch-up. I am currently the proud owner of a G5 iMac (Dual Core) I also use an old G3 iBook for all my Camera work. Small, portable, fast enough for photo's and just so much easier to use. If they do go wrong, which is very rare, I just sort it out myself. No need to re-configure or re-install drivers, they are all there. Yes, I am biased, but I know what I like, and like what I know.........
Let's see was it ten OS X patches this month and 15 last month or the other way around?
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Old Mar 20, 2007, 10:04 PM   #25
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JimC wrote:
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Or, even better, Linux. ;-)

I run my PC in a triboot configuration, so that I can select from Windows XP Pro, SimplyMEPIS 6.0 Final, or SimplyMEPIS 6.5 Release Candidate 2 at bootup.

My wife is running on a laptop that I bought off of Ebay for $112 about 2 years ago.

It's only using 99MB of RAM (with no swap space), with Firefox 2.0 running Flash 9 Player content from our ISP's home page.

That's amazing for a modern operating system with it's nice desktop and feature set (with loads of free software pre-installed, including image managers and editors, all of the Open Office Suite, and much more).




SimplyMEPIS 6.0-4 Beta 4 will run in 69MB (without touching the disk for swap space) without Firefox 2.0 and Flash Player 9 running, and would run in a lot less if I'd get rid of all the stuff I've got loading at bootup. lol

It's been a pretty good laptop for $112 so far. But, then again, she's only been using it for a couple of years. :-) The operating sytem and applicatons I run on it are free.

What version of Photoshop does it run? I think that was part of the original requirement.
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Old Mar 20, 2007, 10:26 PM   #26
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Why would I want to spend more on Photoshop for it than her laptop cost me, when there are already loads of free image editing and management tools included in the distro or available for installation in the software repositories with a mouse click? :-)

Actually, you can run Photoshop versions prior to CS2 in Linux under Wine if desired. Wine tends to be a bit behind more complex apps like Photoshop. So, it takes a while before it catches up with newer versions of PS.

I run lots of Windows apps on my PC under Wine (for example, I run Raw Shooter Essentials and Faststone Image Viewer, and I've even got Internet Explorer 6.0 installed, although I never use it).

But, there are loads of really good image edting tools for Linux available for free. In place of something like Elements (which the OP was interested in), digiKam makes a really nice choice. I've been very impressed with it's raw conversion and basic tools for USM and more. I actually prefer it's output to Adobe Camera Raw more often than not when I run the same raw files through both converters the way I've got it setup now for highlight recovery options. I've got Photoshop CS2 with Adobe Camera Raw on an XP Partition. digiKam is already pre-installed in the distro (as are tools like the Gimp and more).

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Old Mar 20, 2007, 10:47 PM   #27
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JimC wrote:
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Why would I want to spend more on Photoshop for it than laptop costs, when there are already loads of free image editing and management tools included in the distro or available for installation in the software repositories with a mouse click? :-)

Actually, you can run Photoshop versions prior to CS2 in Linux under Wine if desired. Wine tends to be a bit behind more complex apps like Photoshop. So, it takes a while before it catches up with newer versions of PS.

Just going by what the original poster was looking for. There are lots of options for everything but it seemed to me that the poster didn't want more of a learning curvethan he absolutely had to have.
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Old Mar 20, 2007, 10:49 PM   #28
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The three most critical original requirements in order were a.) some version of photoshop elements or CS2 -- I am installing photoshop elemtns 4.0 b.) Windows XP Pro c.) DVD burner

The gateway I ordered is due to arrive Thursday.


As for Macs I was a loyal user 1988 (yes 1988) - 2002 but between 2000 and 2003 I had so many issues and problems with 2 iMacs I had. Even after they repaired both of them I still had major issues. They even replaced the first machine and admitted it was bad and the second one they replaced it with was no better and they blamed me for all the issues with machine 2. I lost almost 1GB of digital photos (from a pansonic floppy disc camera) and a lot of data files durning that time period.

So in 2003 I got my first PC and in 2004 I got the dell laptop I am replacing now.

dave
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Old Mar 20, 2007, 10:50 PM   #29
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Yep.. Elements is popular. But, if you wanted to try some of the free Linux tools around though, you could always install Linux on the same laptop with XP (dual boot). It isn't hard to do.

To give you an idea of some of the tools Linux has available for editing images now (and most are free), I'll mention a few of them here.

UFRaw is popular as a raw converter (also available for Windows), although I find my self using digiKam a lot more lately, since it integrates albums, raw conversion and loads of neat plugins into one program.

Of course, there is also a free ufraw plugin for the Gimp.

Another good product available for LInux that will convert your raw files is Eric Hyman's Bibble (also available for Windows and Mac). It's not free. But, it has a pretty decent feature list available.

http://www.bibblelabs.com/

Also, make sure to check out DigiKam (free).

It's got a pretty good user interface, and I find myself preferring it's tools to some of the better known image editing applications for simple taks (USM, etc.). You'll also find it available in the repositories for most Linux distributions that use KDE.

Here are some screen shots (and make sure to install the kipi plugins for it).

http://www.digikam.org/?q=image/tid/25

Another product to look at is Krita. It's part of the free KOffice suite, and a number of improvements were made to newer versions of Krita. Krita now supports 16 bit editing, raw conversion, layers, color management and more. It's free (no windows version though).

http://www.koffice.org/krita/

Yet another product worth looking at is Lightzone. It's user interface takes some getting used to. But, it's starting to grow on me a bit.

The Windows and Mac version of it are $149.95 or $249.95, depending on the version:

http://www.lightcrafts.com/index.php

But, guess what? They offer it free for Linux users:

http://sonic.net/~rat/lightcrafts/

In a commercial (not free) product, Pixel supports color management with Linux and is an up and coming tool with 16 bit editing ability:

http://www.kanzelsberger.com/pixel/?page_id=12

A lot of Linux users like Cinepaint for image editing. It's a GIMP "fork" (most code oritinally based on the Gimp) and supports editing in 16 bit mode. It's free.

http://www.cinepaint.org/

You can also get a number of Windows image editors to run under Linux via Wine (a free product that lets Windows apps run in Linux). . There are even dedicated sites to help you out with that part. Forget PS CS2 for now (although you can get earlier Photoshop versions to run OK with Linux under Wine).

I run products like Raw Shooter Essentials and the FastStone Image Viewer in Linux via Wine (and Wine is free and installable with a mouse click from the repositories).

Another up and coming Graphics package that's free for Linux is Xara LX:

http://www.xaraxtreme.org/

You can install Picasa in Linux now, too (no version for the Mac yet though):

http://picasa.google.com/linux/

There are many more out there. These are just some of them I've got installed on my PC.

I'm setup so that I use a free boot manager (GRUB) that lets me select the operating system I want to boot into. I've got Windows XP Pro and more than one Linux distribution installed. Note that Windows is now at the bottom of my boot menu choices, since I don't use Windows very often anymore. lol

The software repositories for SimplyMEPIS (the Linux distro I spend most of my time in) have around 18,000 (free) packages available for download right now, including many graphics and multimedia tools.

So, installing new software that's not installed by default is a matter of a mouse click in a built in tool for getting new stuff. For example, installing Cinepaint is just a matter of using it's Package Manager, searching for Cinepaint in the available software list to mark it for installation. When you click apply, it automatically downloads and installs the software you want to install.

Of course, SimplyMEPIS (the Linux distro) is also free. Installation is very easy (and you can resize your Windows NTFS partition to make room for partitions to use with Linux. It's a simple process to install it (and it also installs a boot manager for selecting Windows or SimplyMEPIS during bootup).

http://www.mepis.org

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Old Mar 23, 2007, 8:01 AM   #30
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JimC,

It is good to see Linux users in this kind of work. I am a long time SuSE user myself but I have tried dozens of other flavors of linux. Unfortunately there seems to be a mass mentality that the more you pay for software the better it will be and the better your results will be. At least in my experience when I suggest people use open source software as soon as I tell them its free they turn the other way.

But I will be looking into those software packages you listed. My goal in the end is to spend as little time in Windows as I can. And just to keep it relevant to the topic on hand I have a dual boot Dell Inspiron laptop that runs OpenSuSE 10.2 and XP very well.

TwoStep
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