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Old Mar 26, 2007, 6:19 PM   #21
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AlAsaad wrote:
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"You can change speeds faster with digital" is a Shibboleth: and most times, inaccurate. And "pros" like my own retired self, could change film (for whatever reason) in 8-10 seconds, (more if the camera was sheet film or did not read Bar codes), but who in heck does that anymore other than hobbyists, to whom "time" is more or less philosophical, especially since they got up at 4AMto catch a 5:19AM sunrise?)

Some full manual operation cameras are a pain to change ISO speeds, but a truly "learned" shooter knew precisely what conditions they would be shootingin the first place and had prpared for the eventuality.

None (not any, not one) of my digital SLRs are in anyway faster to change ISO speeds in that unless you can select ISO speed with a wheel under your thumb, you're up sheet creek.

Maybe you can with a $7,000+ Canikon "Robocamera", but seeing as how 99.9999% of all digital cameras cannot change speed without enteringa MENU, then selecting speeds, the "change ISO" Championship goes to (barcode reading film cameras) by default.
For what its worth, I just changed the ISO to 100 (from auto) took and exposure, changed it to ISO 400, took an exposure, changed it back to ISO 100 and took an exposure in 10 seconds. I did that with the Olympus E500 set at 1/3 ev steps and would easily squeeze another one or two exposures if I changed that and practiced a bit. I cannot comment on your camera, but I change mine on the fly all the time. Sun ducks under a cloud, change from ISO 100 to ISO 200 to keep the shutter speed up. Cloud passes, switch it back. I may have taken an exposure or two, perhaps not.

When I wrote the original piece, I didn't do so as a pro because I'm not. I assume the original poster wasn't a pro either. I'm not against film. I'm just stating my experience using both and for me, I was up a creek if I was a few exposures into a roll and then the party moved inside. Do I send a roll with 5 exposures in? Trash it?

I'm pretty sure that this was originally in the "What Camera Should I Buy?" section when I replied to it. Either that Or I got lost and ventured into a different forum. I tried to respond in a way the original poster could use to make a purchasing decision based on other factors than simply the ultimate image quality. I wanted to focus on what camera format "will be the best choice for YOU".

I really don't have anything against the use of film by anyone that chooses to use it. I'd hesitate to recommend film for a new camera, however. I'm quite sure I'll never use film again.

Hope I didn't offend.
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Old Mar 26, 2007, 9:40 PM   #22
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AlAsaad wrote:
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ac.smith wrote:
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Just to get around the issue with film that fldspringer identified many pros of film days carried two or three camera bodies loaded with different speed films so that they would have the right one loaded. No need any more, just dial in the ISO you need for the conditions you find. Need B & W instead of color, switch in camera or Photoshop it.

imaging is moving more and more to digital.
"You can change speeds faster with digital" is a Shibboleth: and most times, inaccurate. And "pros" like my own retired self, could change film (for whatever reason) in 8-10 seconds, (more if the camera was sheet film or did not read Bar codes), but who in heck does that anymore other than hobbyists, to whom "time" is more or less philosophical, especially since they got up at 4AMto catch a 5:19AM sunrise?)

Some full manual operation cameras are a pain to change ISO speeds, but a truly "learned" shooter knew precisely what conditions they would be shootingin the first place and had prpared for the eventuality.

None (not any, not one) of my digital SLRs are in anyway faster to change ISO speeds in that unless you can select ISO speed with a wheel under your thumb, you're up sheet creek.

Maybe you can with a $7,000+ Canikon "Robocamera", but seeing as how 99.9999% of all digital cameras cannot change speed without enteringa MENU, then selecting speeds, the "change ISO" Championship goes to (barcode reading film cameras) by default.
Let me see, to change to a different ASA in 1970 with a 35mm SLR:

1.Note # exposures taken. Push the rewind button on bottom of the case.

2. Flip out rewind lever on rewind knob.

3 Turn until film releases from take-up spindle and then one turn more so that the tongue is still out of the cassette.

4.Pull back releaseand open back. Remove cassette

5. Insert new cassette. Pull tongue across and insert in take-up spindle

6. Close back. Advance film, fire shutter, repeat two more times.

7. Pull up on shutter knob and turn to enter ASA in meter.

8. Take picture(s).

9. To change back repeat 1 thru 6 except fire shutter number of exposes noted plus one with lens cap on.

Truthfully step 9 was rarely exercised if the cost of film/processing could be reasonably passed on to customer.Those steps are why I carried at least two bodies in those days. I can, then and now anticipate conditions.

Change ISO on Kodak Z612.

1. Rotate dial to PASM.

2. Rotate thumb-wheel no more than 5 clicks depending on initial position in view finder to the ISO position.

3. Press thumb-wheel to activate change mode.

4. Turn thumb-wheel to set ISO.

5. Press thumb-wheel to activate setting.

6. Take picture(s)

7. To change back steps 3 thru 5.

Which is quicker?

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Old Mar 27, 2007, 6:52 AM   #23
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For some cameras, it's even easier. For example, this is the way my little Maxxum 5D works;:

Press and hold the dedicated ISO button, spin control wheel until desired ISO speed appears in display, release ISO button.


You've also got Auto ISO available on most digital cameras.

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Old Mar 27, 2007, 11:53 AM   #24
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Z612 has auto-ISO as well,A previous commenter was claiming changing ISO on a digital was as complex and time-consuming as changing film in a film SLR so I compared the standard case on my film SLRs against the worst case on my Z612.

In a way I did a worst case on film SLRs as later models than mine have motorized loading and rewind however in my somewhat limited experience with those the auto- load fails about one in ten.

In both case I went through the steps prior to writing my comments.
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Old Mar 27, 2007, 3:49 PM   #25
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I used to be cranking out amazing 8x10" prints with my old 4.1 megapixel Nikon Coolpix, and i bought that in 2003.

When people get digital prints done, they immediately look at it about an inch away from their face, desperately searching for some flaw. Rarely do you find anything you wouldn't notice if you hadn't been the person taking it. I've been guilty of this myself.

Post processing renders this a moot point anyway.

Ask yourself, 'how often am i making 20x30" prints that are meant to be looked at from two inches away?" I imagine the answer is "never".

Film may be what you need for immense, immense photos, but that's about it.

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Old Mar 27, 2007, 4:17 PM   #26
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Here are a couple of dated articles that some readers may find of interest:

3 Megapixel Canon EOS-D30 versus Provia 100F

6 Megapixel Canon EOS-D60 compared to Medium Format


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Old Mar 28, 2007, 9:02 AM   #27
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JimC wrote:
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Here are a couple of dated articles that some readers may find of interest:

3 Megapixel Canon EOS-D30 versus Provia 100F

6 Megapixel Canon EOS-D60 compared to Medium Format

Great material. Thanks.
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Old Mar 28, 2007, 12:14 PM   #28
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Another perspective, the premier photo-journalistic magazine still in print is National Geographic, who has a well earned reputation for being absolutely persnickety (anal) about all aspects concerning the quality of the images appearing in their magazine, has been completely digital for 15 years
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Editor and photog sitting at a light table looking at slides....
To which the comment was made that he's a dinosaur (still shooting film). I chuckled @ one part where weight on the plane was critical yet later they talk about how he shot (not sure if it was the same shoot) some 600 rolls of film - how much would that weigh? I also chuckled @ his statements about loving the excitement of looking at the pictures on the way home from developing.......um, ya know you could have done that on the spot, right? :-)

Just as with almost anything - like folks who won't ever shop on "that new fangled internet thing"

I won't argue with the pros on which one is better but this thread did remind me of that special - it was interesting & funny @ the same time.
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Old Mar 28, 2007, 1:13 PM   #29
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Bailey59 wrote:
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Another perspective, the premier photo-journalistic magazine still in print is National Geographic, who has a well earned reputation for being absolutely persnickety (anal) about all aspects concerning the quality of the images appearing in their magazine, has been completely digital for 15 years
Quote:
Editor and photog sitting at a light table looking at slides....
To which the comment was made that he's a dinosaur (still shooting film). I chuckled @ one part where weight on the plane was critical yet later they talk about how he shot (not sure if it was the same shoot) some 600 rolls of film - how much would that weigh? I also chuckled @ his statements about loving the excitement of looking at the pictures on the way home from developing.......um, ya know you could have done that on the spot, right? :-)

Just as with almost anything - like folks who won't ever shop on "that new fangled internet thing"

I won't argue with the pros on which one is better but this thread did remind me of that special - it was interesting & funny @ the same time.
I don't the details of NatGeo's current practices but in the '70s I attended a Nikon sponsered seminar where one of the presenters was a frequent NatGeo photographer. Therequirement at that time was to pack one 36 exp. of Kodachrome for each day the photog would be gone (plus I presume any special requirements films.) Any film not used by the end of the assignment was to thrown away because throwing it away was cheaper than the excess baggage costs and calibration could not be assured because of the variables of travel. The film was from NatGeo's own temperature controlled stocks. Kodachrome was processed by NatGeo's own lab while Ektachome was processed by Kodak.

If I read NatGeo's web site correctly they offer a guide to digital photography. Don't know who the intended audience is and haven't had a chance to look at it myself.
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