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Old Apr 19, 2007, 8:52 PM   #11
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The best/cheapest way to calibrate your monitor using adobe Gamma, or your video card's calibration software, is to calibrate monitor to your prints.

First, print a picture as directly from the camera as possible. This usually means a jpeg with no post-processing. The photo should have a good range of colors. Enable Print Image Matching, if possible. Print on your printer's recommended glossy paper at the best setting.

Now, bring up the monitor adjustment s/w or Adobe gamma, and ignore the instructions . Use the step-by-step setting, and make the monitor look like the print. Your pints will now look like the monitor and vice-versa. Since the print was initially done with P-I-M, which is how most commercial printers work, you should also get very good color matching from a lab as well.

Using this method, I am able to take a photo, print it, and compare it to the original subject as well as the monitor, and have excellent color match.

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Old Apr 19, 2007, 9:15 PM   #12
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VTphotog wrote:
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First, print a picture as directly from the camera as possible. This usually means a jpeg with no post-processing. The photo should have a good range of colors. Enable Print Image Matching, if possible. Print on your printer's recommended glossy paper at the best setting.

Now, bring up the monitor adjustment s/w or Adobe gamma, and ignore the instructions . Use the step-by-step setting, and make the monitor look like the print. Your pints will now look like the monitor and vice-versa. Since the print was initially done with P-I-M, which is how most commercial printers work, you should also get very good color matching from a lab as well.
cmoy, this is what I referred to in my first message. Because the human eye interprets reflected colorandtransmitted color differently, calibrating your monitoris a significant task, the results of which you may never actually be satisfied with.

This process is also heavily dependant on the lighting used to illuminate the printed image while you attempt to match the monitor to it.

But VTphotog's procedure is a good one, and if you've got some time, you might want to try it.
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Old Apr 21, 2007, 9:00 AM   #13
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Thanks guys!

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Chris
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