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Old Jul 26, 2003, 9:43 AM   #1
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Default Do I really Need 4MP????

I was looking at the A70 (like everyone else these days) when I came across the Samsung V4 and picked it up and started playing with it. Looked nice enough so, I come home, get online and read some pretty good things about it. My question is, do I need a 4MP camera? My photography consists of the usualy day to day shots and, vacation pic. Nothing glamorous. It's highly unlikely that I would ever print anything above an 8 x 10 but, would the extra pixels improve smaller prints?

rgds,
Mark
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Old Jul 26, 2003, 10:42 AM   #2
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Checkout whether the extra Mpix also brings better sensitivity. I'd put low light performance and lens first, if my choice was only for small prints. Are you confident that a manufacturer understands camera products and how they are used - or are they just another electronics component manufacturer building cameras? What experience have they had with past products - are they video/still biased or a newcomer?
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Old Jul 27, 2003, 4:53 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by voxmagna
Checkout whether the extra Mpix also brings better sensitivity.
OK, showing my ignorance towards digital camera I'll have to ask-how do you compare sensitivity???
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Old Jul 27, 2003, 5:59 PM   #4
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Look at what ASA options it does. Basic is 100ASA. 200ASA means for the same light you can halve the shutter or reduce 1 f stop. 400 ASA means 4 fstops or 1/4 shutter. So that means faster shutter speeds can be used in lower light, at the limits you can probably take more pics without flash, and the autofocus on the camera is likely to work better.

However, increasing sensitivity (Measured as equivalent ASA) brings some extra noise into pics (similar to 400ASA film). But this can be reduced in editing with some skill.

Having more camera sensitivity means you are less often to need a tripod in low light to stop camera shake, because you can use a higher shutter speed.

Sometimes you will be in places where flash is not allowed. With more camera sensitivity you stand a chance of getting a pic without flash.
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Old Jul 27, 2003, 11:19 PM   #5
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Well, I'm well aware of the whole ASA/ISO thing but to be honest with you, I thought you were talking about the sensitivity of the CCD in the digital camera.
I have used film cameras for years and I thought you were talking about something pertaining exclusively to digital cameras.

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Old Jul 27, 2003, 11:55 PM   #6
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I agree with what voxmagna said. You'll be surprised how handy it is to increase the ASA/ISO so you can get a faster shutter speed. I take loads of pictures at ISO800 so I can stop my subject (a bird) in motion, or so I get a reasonable/appropriate shutter speed for the amount of zoom I'm using. It's invaluable.

Are you taking pictures indoors more or outdoors? If its indoors, you probably want a wider zoom (because you’ll be limited in how much you can step backwards to get everything you want in the shot.) Look for 30mm or even lower (that will be listed in the “35-mm equivalent” zoom listing.) The A70 is 35-105 equivalent. So that is ok, but not very wide. The V4 is 38-114mm, so its even wider (but slight longer zoom.)

Indoor pictures usually have less light and therefor require either a decent flash or higher ISO/ASA. A focus assist lamp is also very handy. The A70 has one, I don’t know if the V4 does.

Personally, I’d go with the Canon. A quick scan of the features makes me think the V4 is a simpler camera. Personally, I’d miss the extra functionality the A70 has. It’s a touch choice, though, ‘cause of the slightly lower MP. You might miss it… but you might also miss the focus assist lamp, larger image zoom on playback and other features. Why no read Steves’ reviews and see what you think:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2003_...igimax_v4.html

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2003_reviews/a70.html

Eric
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Old Jul 28, 2003, 8:34 AM   #7
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Quote:
Well, I'm well aware of the whole ASA/ISO thing but to be honest with you, I thought you were talking about the sensitivity of the CCD in the digital camera.
You will know then that film has more latitude then than digital, so whereas you might push 100ASA film to 200+ and still get decent prints, in digital this is less likely. Equivalent ASA on a digital camera depends mainly on the ccd design and by reducing noise in the 'digital amplifiers' I call this 'sensitivity' for simplicity. It's the ccd size and design itself which contributes most - and you can't change that like you can putting in a roll of 400ASA film!
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Old Jul 28, 2003, 9:25 AM   #8
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Well let me ask this then, does the size of the sensor make a difference and if so, how much of a difference??

Mark
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Old Jul 28, 2003, 10:00 AM   #9
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We could start discussing full frame dslr's or prosumer digicams. Which camera do you have the money for? Since you're looking at paper specs, why not just find out what ASA range is covered ask in the right camera section here for sample pics at the higher levels and decide whether you like them or not?

On Pbase, most posted pics have their EXIF date attached, so you can download the full image file and see for yourself.

Personally, I'd always look for the largest sensor with the greatest number of photo sites, lens on pixel if it's done and fastest lens. Laws of physics say this must be best. Unfortunately most sensor chips are of a similar physical size, to keep costs down and allow smaller camera design.

So the differentiation becomes the technology in sensor design and in-camera processing. Back to my first post, a 100 ASA camera is likely to have an older sensor design, since it is more common now to get up to 400ASA and higher with reduced resolution pixel output combining techniques. Of course there will always be plenty stock of older sensors around for a while, so there will be cams sold which are a good price. Do you want yesterdays technology in todays camera, or todays technology and improvements? Of course with film it doesn't matter so much as the technology is understood, stable and mature.

A 100 ASA camera is likely already out of date, and a 400 ASA camera will be in a years time! But if sensitivity is not an issue and Mpix is, why worry?
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Old Jul 28, 2003, 2:56 PM   #10
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Thanks for all your advice. I know it must not seem like it but, I've looked and looked and researched and researched and yet, I'm still undecided....and when I say looked and looked, I mean on the net for info and, I've been ALL over pbase looking at pictures. To be honest with you, if Canon didn't have quality issues, I would have aready gone out and bought an A70.

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