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Old Jun 11, 2007, 3:48 PM   #11
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peripatetic wrote:
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Restricting yourself to one lens helps a bit, but is no guarantee that you won't get dust on the sensor.
And I would add that restricting yourself to only one lens will result in loss of quality on virtually every shot you take (unless you only take one type of shot and that single lens is a high quality specialty lens and not a superzoom).

I'm with peripatetic though - it takes me about 5-20 minutes to clean the sensor (5 minutes if blower is enough, 10 if blower then brush is enough, 15-20 if wet sensor clean is required). I clean about every 4-6 months but I shoot at wide apertures a lot so the dust isn't noticable as if I shot at closed down apertures.

In all honesty, it's such a non-issue for me I wouldn't even consider the self-cleaning option in a purchase. To me it's just one more thing that can break down.And there are more important features to me that I want to make sure my camera and camera system provides. But if dust is going to keep you up at night then consider one of the cameras out there with anti-dust technology.
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Old Jun 11, 2007, 4:11 PM   #12
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Why does it take so long (20 minutes) to clean such a little sensor? Sounds daunting.
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Old Jun 11, 2007, 4:39 PM   #13
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It takes 19 minutes to sterlize the room & put on your Hazmat suit & 1 minute to clean the sensor.....
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Old Jun 11, 2007, 5:27 PM   #14
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Kalypso wrote:
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It takes 19 minutes to sterlize the room & put on your Hazmat suit & 1 minute to clean the sensor.....
:G Not too far from the truth. It's a progression - try the blower, take a test shot, download to computer and check, try brush - same thing. Then try wet technique. In general the last takes ME the most time because at that point there is a very determined spec on the sensor. In 2 years with my 20d I've had to use the wet technique all of ONCE. That is also why it takes me so long.
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Old Jun 11, 2007, 7:14 PM   #15
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I haven't had a reason to use the wet method yet - all of the dust I've had so far in a year and a half of owning a dSLR has come off with a handblower. And that includes the junk I got in the camera once when I first got the camera and wasn't careful about the wind. I was snowshoeing on a windy mountain and a gust almost blew me over. I did drop the lens I was holding and got all kinds of dust in the camera. After that I learned to have the new lens all ready to go on, and have it right next to the camera. As I remove one lens, the second lens slides into place, with minimal time exposing the camera. And HAVE YOUR BACK TO THE WIND! I usually notice dust about once a month or so, and I change lenses frequently (tend to use primes instead of zooms). A couple of squirts of air from a hand blower and that's been it so far.
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Old Jun 11, 2007, 11:02 PM   #16
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I can vouch for the Olympus dust-removal system. I have two E-1 bodies and dust has never been an issue.
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