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Old Jun 10, 2007, 7:06 PM   #1
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I've decided to take the plunge and get an DSLR rather than a PS. Is dust getting on the sensor a big problem? How hard is it to clean?
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Old Jun 10, 2007, 7:22 PM   #2
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Unless you'd be in the habit of opening your camera in a sandstorm, dust on the sensor isn't a real big problem, and many dSLRs have methods of dealing with it automatically.
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Old Jun 10, 2007, 7:26 PM   #3
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rcfuzz wrote:
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I've decided to take the plunge and get an DSLR rather than a PS. Is dust getting on the sensor a big problem? How hard is it to clean?
For many people, cleaning the sensor is something they just get used to occasionally doing and think nothing of it. If you want a no-maintenance solution, tho, get an Olympus. The new E-510 with in-body image stabilization and liveview looks very tempting.

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Old Jun 10, 2007, 8:02 PM   #4
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Thanks for the replies. It's just that when I used to own a SLR years ago I remember always having to clean dust off the mirror and prism.
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Old Jun 10, 2007, 8:03 PM   #5
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Norm in Fujino wrote:
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rcfuzz wrote:

For many people, cleaning the sensor is something they just get used to occasionally doing and think nothing of it. If you want a no-maintenance solution, tho, get an Olympus. The new E-510 with in-body image stabilization and liveview looks very tempting.
I heard about the Olympus but I can't get a handle on it if it's a good camera or not. Got to keep reading I guess. It happens to be a good bargain right now.
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Old Jun 10, 2007, 8:20 PM   #6
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rcfuzz wrote:
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I heard about the Olympus but I can't get a handle on it if it's a good camera or not. Got to keep reading I guess. It happens to be a good bargain right now.
See http://www.popphoto.com/cameras/4116...and-e-410.html
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Old Jun 11, 2007, 12:12 AM   #7
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rcfuzz wrote:
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I've decided to take the plunge and get an DSLR rather than a PS. Is dust getting on the sensor a big problem? How hard is it to clean?
How much of an issue it is depends on how much you need to have to have pictures without visible dust. Most times, it can be removed in post-processing by a bit of cloning, being most visible is areas of sky or similar low detail parts of pic. It can be quite annoying to find that after a lens change, the sensor picked up a speck right where you don't need it. I find that it is more prevalent in the winter when humidity is very low. I hesitate to swap lenses then.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Cleaning is not usually very difficult, most often you can use a squeeze bulb type blower to remove it.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"One of the newer cameras such as the Olys mentioned, or Pentax K10d or Sony A100 have a dust removal method which basically shakes the sensor. Other makers have also come up with methods to keep it down.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"I would prefer a more permanent solution, such as sealing the camera body itself with a properly coated window inside the lens mount.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"brian
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Old Jun 11, 2007, 6:24 AM   #8
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VTphotog wrote:
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How much of an issue it is depends on how much you need to have to have pictures without visible dust. Most times, it can be removed in post-processing by a bit of cloning, being most visible is areas of sky or similar low detail parts of pic. It can be quite annoying to find that after a lens change, the sensor picked up a speck right where you don't need it. I find that it is more prevalent in the winter when humidity is very low. I hesitate to swap lenses then.
This doesn't ease my fears. I thought one of the nice things about digital vs. film was you didn't have to deal with dust and hairs getting on your prints. I may never take my lens off.
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Old Jun 11, 2007, 2:22 PM   #9
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Afraid not. Dust is the enemy of photography. Digital and film.

I've found it to be slightly less hassle on digital though in general.

There are quite a few cameras now that have anti-dust sensor vibration which keeps the dust off pretty well. Cleaning a sensor though is very easy and usually takes not much more than 5 minutes and doesn't need to be done very frequently, I do mine every 2-3 months.

Restricting yourself to one lens helps a bit, but is no guarantee that you won't get dust on the sensor. Most zoom lenses have a bellows effect pushing air in and out, some of that air has dust, and some of that dust can get into the chamber and then onto the sensor. But buying a SLR and then only using one lens because you're afraid of dust is like buying a Porsche and never changing out of first gear because you're afraid of damaging the gearbox by changing gears. Doesn't make any sense IMO.

Don't worry about dust, it's no big deal.


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Old Jun 11, 2007, 2:47 PM   #10
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rcfuzz wrote:
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I've decided to take the plunge and get an DSLR rather than a PS. Is dust getting on the sensor a big problem? How hard is it to clean?

It's not a big problem and it's fairly easy to clean. If you've cleaned a 35mm mirror, you should have no problem.....I've cleaned mine once in the past year.
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