Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 13, 2007, 11:25 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 4
Default

So I recently bought the Sony DSC-T100 and I like it but here is the problem, I have no idea what Image size is good, theres so many and they are all kind of weird. I mostly take pictures of me with friends and computer parts, with the occasional use of taking pictures of small fonts on computer parts. So on my Camera it has the following Image Size: 8M (A3 or 11X17"). 3:2 aspect ratio, 5M (A4 or 8.4x11"), 3M or 4x6" or 5X7", VGA, and 16:9 (HDTV aspect ratio) Out of all these which is the best one to go with?
aznpotpie is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 14, 2007, 7:41 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,544
Default

I think you'd be best served by sticking with the 8M. It will give you the highest resolution image, so that you can read the fine print on those computer parts, and you will still have a decent level of detail if you decide to crop the image.

If you use a smaller image size, you might not be as able to do those thing.

The only drawback is that they take a lot of space on your memory card and on your computer, and take a long time to transfer (from the camera's buffer to the memory card, from the memory card to the computer's hard disk drive, from the computer's hard disk drive to the image editting application and back from the computer's hard disk drive to the CD, etc.)
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 14, 2007, 9:53 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
tjsnaps's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sacramento, Ca
Posts: 652
Default

Its not a matter of what you are taking pictures of, but of what you will use them for. For print you want more resolution for the web you want smalller file sizes.
tjsnaps is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 14, 2007, 10:32 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Tom LaPrise's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 324
Default

Take them big, then if you need smaller copies you can resample them down on a PC.
Tom LaPrise is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 14, 2007, 10:35 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Tom LaPrise's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 324
Default

(I only hit Send once...)
Tom LaPrise is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 14, 2007, 11:49 PM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 4
Default

Space is not the issue because I'm going to buy a 8GB MS Pro Duo which would hold well over a thousand pictures, and I got a 500GB HDD on my computer with a Raptor, so thats no problem. Posting pictures online is no problem either since i'm using my website and out of the 5GB i'm allow to use, i'm only using 100MB. So yeah, theres basicially no limits. Okay so using 8M is huge. I took with 8M and it's huge but if resize it so it's smaller in lets say paint or something will it still look good? And yes this will be posted on a special part of my website and on my computer for my own use.
aznpotpie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 15, 2007, 6:03 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,544
Default

aznpotpie wrote:
Quote:
I took with 8M and it's huge but if resize it so it's smaller in lets say paint or something will it still look good?
No.

aznpotpie wrote:
Quote:
And yes this will be posted on a special part of my website and on my computer for my own use.
If you need the large image for your own use (to read the fine print on computer parts) and you need a small image for posting on your website, you'll get yourbest results by taking two photos, one large and one small. The camera will make a better small image from the subject thana programresizing the large image will. But if your primary concern is to make the large image for yourself, there are programs that will create smaller images from a batch of large images. That would be the most convenient solution.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 15, 2007, 9:21 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
BillDrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hay River Township, WI
Posts: 2,512
Default

TCav wrote:
Quote:
If you need the large image for your own use (to read the fine print on computer parts) and you need a small image for posting on your website, you'll get yourbest results by taking two photos, one large and one small. The camera will make a better small image from the subject thana programresizing the large image will. ...
Are you sure about that? Seems contradictory to everything I have heard about using the small processor in the camera vs having the power of a PC/Mac doing the downsizing. There might be an issue of working with a JPEG vs working with the RAW image the camera can do (not sure it actually does) even if the camera does not output RAW.
BillDrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 15, 2007, 9:38 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,544
Default

BillDrew wrote:
Quote:
TCav wrote:
Quote:
If you need the large image for your own use (to read the fine print on computer parts) and you need a small image for posting on your website, you'll get yourbest results by taking two photos, one large and one small. The camera will make a better small image from the subject thana programresizing the large image will. ...
Are you sure about that? Seems contradictory to everything I have heard about using the small processor in the camera vs having the power of a PC/Mac doing the downsizing. There might be an issue of working with a JPEG vs working with the RAW image the camera can do (not sure it actually does) even if the camera does not output RAW.
Absolutely. Sampling and compressing a small image just once in the camera will produce a better image than sampling and compressing a large imagein the camera and then resampling and recompressing a smaller image on a computer. The camera has the original subject to start with; the computer starts with an image that the camera created.

The only problem isthat, currently,there aren't a lot of cameras that, all by themselves, create images suitable for posting to a website.

Below is an image that contains two photos. Both were taken with my Nikon CoolPix 880. The one on top was taken at VGA-Fine (640x480) while the one on the bottom was taken at FULL-Fine (2048x1536) and then resized to 640x480 in PSE5. While the pixelation is clear in both images, the bottom image is a lot softer because of the pixelation of a pixelated image.
Attached Images
 
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:48 PM.