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Old Aug 10, 2003, 6:22 PM   #1
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Default Why did this work??

Please bear with me here, I have only been "into" photography for 6 months and before that knew NOTHING.

I own a Fuji 3800 which does not allow one to adjust the shutter speed or ISO rating (fixed at 100). When taking shots indoors, especially of large rooms, I have come up witht he following problems ....

1) If i use flash the firt 10 feet are nicely lit up,the rest of the room dark

2) If i don't use flash and use "auto" I still risk blur

3) If i don't use flash and use night scene mode with no tripod it blurs TERRIBLY

So on the weekend .. i thought .. ."well i'll try this" ... i turned the flash of and used "Sport" mode ... figuring that the faster shutter speed might work.

The result? BEAUTIFUL shots indoors in poorly lit rooms, no blurring and a good capture of light ... great detail, even on slightly "close up" shots.

i couldn't beleive it .. i was stunned. This has been a weakness of the camera AND I SEEMED TO HAVE SOLVED IT ... I AM SO CHUFFED.

So I checked the EXIF data and on "AUTO" the shutter speed indoors is 1/2 .. on "SPORT" it is 1/4 .. is that the sole reason why it has worked? Is the slightly faster shutter speed the cause?

If it is .... woudl you all suggest that 1/4 is a shutter speed you would use on yor adjustable camera in that situation?
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Old Aug 10, 2003, 6:53 PM   #2
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The faster shutter speed would definitely reduce blurring due to camera shake, but normally it would also cause darker pictures. Take a look at the EXIF data again and see if the ISO isn't pushed upwards quite a bit. Extra ISO sensitivity would be my guess as to why you can get more light with less exposure time.

I would have also guessed a larger aperture, but Night Mode ought to open the aperture all the way too, so that kind of rules out that as a factor.
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Old Aug 10, 2003, 7:24 PM   #3
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No I just checked and it is still at 100 ... go figure
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Old Aug 10, 2003, 9:53 PM   #4
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It's MAGIC! :shock:

Seriously. How else could you explain it?
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Old Aug 10, 2003, 9:57 PM   #5
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Well this was the "darkest" of the shots ... was a fairly dim room ........ not a BRILLIANT pic but certainly better than any other setting and not bad for a Point + Shoot.

"Jaggies" are bcause i reduced the size of the pic on imagestation so it can do that to straight edges.

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Old Aug 10, 2003, 11:26 PM   #6
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What most likely happened is that since the camera had to have a faster shutter speed for sn action shot, it most likely openned up the aperature to allow more light to enter. Remember in photography the same amount of light will hit the sensor if the aperature is set to a lower number (and thus opened up more) and if the shutter speed is set to be twice as fast as well.
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Old Aug 10, 2003, 11:46 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ardvark50
What most likely happened is that since the camera had to have a faster shutter speed for sn action shot, it most likely openned up the aperature to allow more light to enter. Remember in photography the same amount of light will hit the sensor if the aperature is set to a lower number (and thus opened up more) and if the shutter speed is set to be twice as fast as well.
Ahhhhhh now that sounds plausible
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Old Aug 11, 2003, 5:09 AM   #8
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Remember, that flash is so fast you can set a shutter speed of 1/1000th of a second and ONLY THE FLASH LIGHTS THE SCENE. Most cam manufacturers are aware of this with their puny flashes, so try to allow some of the natural light through. This stops the abrupt loss of flash range, giving a smoother light transition to the shadows - but it can cause problems with white balance afterwards. Aperture, flash power and ISO are the only things that determine exposure. In auto flash modes you sometimes need to find out what your camera is doing, and is it unhooked from setting shutter speeds. E.g night shot mode will often set flash to foreground fill, whilst opening the aperture and slowing shutter afterwards, to give correct exposure for the background. That's why you get blurry shots!

When you set the fast shutter speed, your flash pics will have high contrast, at short distances (soot and whitewash) - some people don't like this.

In Alfisti's shot, most of the light is coming from the room, His shutter will have been quite long with large aperture, his flash would have filled in the foreground. At some point with these shots you need a steady hand or a tripod - and pray nothing moves!
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Old Aug 11, 2003, 6:19 AM   #9
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Vox is right!

The flash short duration froze the action no matter what the shutter speed is, however if the ambient light is slighly higher and the flash intensity from the camera is reduced (automatically) you'll still captured that blurry motion! 1/4 to 1/2s is really not enough to freeze any action, the room is just dark enough so the 'fast' burst output (more like 1/40,000s, can't be too long from that tiny camera/battery) from the flash stops the action by illuminating it... As the room becomes brighter then the flash becomes a fill and with the ambient light contributing to the overall scene, you'll see the blur motion at slower shutter speed...

You can usually tell by the color, cool white is from the flash as it turn to warmer/yellow from ambient/incandescent light.
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