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Old Jul 31, 2007, 2:48 PM   #1
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I have about $1500 worth of equipment right now and I know that this is not a lot by some peoples standards, but it is a lot too me. I worked really, really hard to get this equipment and I am really worried about it getting stolen. I plan on going on a nature photography tour in Panama and I have to transfer plans in N. America which I could see the equipment getting lost or stolen there. Also when we are in Panama city I could see it getting stolen there. I was wondering what kind of policy would be best for this situation?

Thanks very much in advance for any input!
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Old Jul 31, 2007, 3:01 PM   #2
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First, check your homeowners and automobile policies. Quite often they will cover lost or stolen cameras, even if you're away from home and not using your automobile. Also, check the airline to see if your loss will be covered.

Lastly, check with your insurance agent. He or she will know best what coverage you already have and what additional insurance you might want for your photographic equipment.
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Old Jul 31, 2007, 4:07 PM   #3
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[img]file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/ADMINI%7E1/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot.jpg[/img][img]file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/ADMINI%7E1/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot-1.jpg[/img]Hi again :-)
You are right to worry, it is also one of my fears when traveling.
A friend of mine lost all his equipment in Ecuador last year, and he was not away from his car for more than 5 minutes before it was broken into and taken.

TCav is right, check with your home owners agent first sometimes it will cover you for everything you need, and maybe if needed see if they can give a separate rider on your policy for your equipment.
The homeowners is usually pretty good so long as they don't suspect you have been using your equipment for business use.

Just keep a good record of your equipment, serial numbers and receipts if possible.
You will probably need that info to register the equipment at customs if you are crossing any borders.
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Old Jul 31, 2007, 5:07 PM   #4
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PeterP wrote:
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[img]file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/ADMINI%7E1/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot.jpg[/img][img]file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/ADMINI%7E1/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot-1.jpg[/img]Hi again :-)
You are right to worry, it is also one of my fears when traveling.
A friend of mine lost all his equipment in Ecuador last year, and he was not away from his car for more than 5 minutes before it was broken into and taken.

TCav is right, check with your home owners agent first sometimes it will cover you for everything you need, and maybe if needed see if they can give a separate rider on your policy for your equipment.
The homeowners is usually pretty good so long as they don't suspect you have been using your equipment for business use.

Just keep a good record of your equipment, serial numbers and receipts if possible.
You will probably need that info to register the equipment at customs if you are crossing any borders.
You have to register your camera equipment at the border? Really? What does that entail?

Thanks.
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Old Jul 31, 2007, 7:22 PM   #5
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Well at Canadian customs you just go and fill out a little form that lists all your equipment and the serial numbers. Then you get to keep a card that lists it all.

It is most useful when returning home to prove you are comming back with the same equipment you left with and did not purchase anything outside the country.
Generally if you can't prove you had it in the first place they try to nail you for duty when comming back.

You get to keep and reuse the card unless you buy more "stuff" then you need to redo the form.

I know Canadian Customs does it, I'm guessing US customs will have something similar in place to help track your equipment.

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Old Jul 31, 2007, 7:52 PM   #6
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I am going through an insurance claim right now. My 20D and the Sigma 80-400 attatched at the time wound up under water. I added a "personal articles floater" to my homeowners policy when I purchased the gear. (Floater - how ironic) The insurance co. wants "Proof of purchase". I have the receipt for the body, but have not found the lens receipt yet. If you have homeowners or renters insurance you should be able to add the needed coverage for "pennies a day".
Ron

PS: anyone know where I can pick up a used 5D??? :angry:
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Old Jul 31, 2007, 9:32 PM   #7
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PeterP wrote:
Quote:
Well at Canadian customs you just go and fill out a little form that lists all your equipment and the serial numbers. Then you get to keep a card that lists it all.

It is most useful when returning home to prove you are comming back with the same equipment you left with and did not purchase anything outside the country.
Generally if you can't prove you had it in the first place they try to nail you for duty when comming back.

You get to keep and reuse the card unless you buy more "stuff" then you need to redo the form.

I know Canadian Customs does it, I'm guessing US customs will have something similar in place to help track your equipment.
Wow thanks for that!!! This is the first time going out of the states aside from a couple of cruises but those are completely different.
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Old Aug 2, 2007, 1:48 AM   #8
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And its been years (pre 9/11) since I have dealt with this, but US is pretty much the same way... you leave with anything valuable (like jewelry too) you register it before departure (even right at the border)... then no question coming back.

You leave with a Timex and come back with a Rolex.... you will be questioned either way
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Old Aug 5, 2007, 9:57 AM   #9
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chupicabra30 wrote:
Quote:
I have about $1500 worth of equipment right now and I know that this is not a lot by some peoples standards, but it is a lot too me. I worked really, really hard to get this equipment and I am really worried about it getting stolen. I plan on going on a nature photography tour in Panama and I have to transfer plans in N. America which I could see the equipment getting lost or stolen there. Also when we are in Panama city I could see it getting stolen there. I was wondering what kind of policy would be best for this situation?

Thanks very much in advance for any input!
You should get a seperate ryder on your homeowners or renters insurance policy to cover your camera equipment. Usually they will want a list of your equipment, which you have to remember to update when you buy or sell equipment. Make sure it is replacement value insurance, and make sure they will cover things like dropping it in the lake, or any other kind of breakage. Another thing is if you do photography as a business this kind of policy will probably not cover you, you would need a business policy (inland marine policy) which also includes liability insurance among other things. These are more expensive, mine runs almost $500 a year compaired to less than $100 for a simple ryder.
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Old Aug 8, 2007, 5:27 PM   #10
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The point about "registering" your gear in the US is absolutely true.

I'm on Arthur Moris's news letter (he runs photo trips around the US and the world, along with selling his own pictures) and he just talked about how he was stopped coming back into the US for the first time ever. Needless to say he has just a we bit of gear. No one else on the trip with him was stopped.

He was able to get in but he hadn't brought any of the documentation and could have had a serious hassle.

Eric
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