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Old Aug 14, 2003, 9:05 AM   #1
AK
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Default Macro photography

Hi all,
I'm a new member, so i'm not sure if I've posted this in the right forum... If I haven't someone tell me Oh, I"ll post it in the wildlife forum as well, it's kinda to do with wildlife..

Okay, I primarily do photography on invertebrates, and to a lesser extent 'larger' animals (such as possums, etc etc), as well as general landscape photos.

I currently have an Olympus C3020Z, which is a good overall camera. BUT, it's just not good enough for macro shots....

Does anyone have any recommendations for a camera with good image quality and good macro?

To make things more difficult, the 3x optical zoom was just not enough in most cases for my shots.

As I keep searching, it gets harder and harder to find an 'ideal' camera. Methinks a compromise is a must!

The Fujifilm FinePix S7000 Z has caught my eye, but there don't seem to be any reviews around yet. Does anyone know anything about this camera?

I've been reading up on the problems with higher megapixels (slower loading, slower autofocussing, etc). Are these true? Also are there any problems with the cameras with higher optical zooms (ie >5x)?

Any help would be very very much appreciated!

thanks,

AK

p.s. please excuse the lengthy post! ops:
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Old Aug 14, 2003, 12:38 PM   #2
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Lengthy is better than too short, and someone has to say, "can you expand your question?"

Anyway, if you're happy with Olympus there are newer ones with "super macro" that can go closer than your 3020. Your 3020 can only go as close as 8"/20cm, while many current Olys (with super macro) can go as close as 1.2"/3cm. I only mention that because some people may want to stick with the brand they know.

As for the Fuji, if it's a brand new camera Fuji may not have sent out review cameras out yet. You can do a search at Google.com for FUJI S7000 REVIEW but be aware that some reviewers (not Steve) post reviews based on the prerelease model of the camera that they saw at a tradeshow, and pass them off as full reviews. I caught one camera site doing that...they had outdated information based on the pre-release model.
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Old Aug 14, 2003, 7:01 PM   #3
AK
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cheers
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Old Aug 14, 2003, 7:12 PM   #4
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There is a part of macro photo quality in cameras that is hardly touched in reviews; How close does the lense has to approach the scene to catch lets say 5x5 cm?

1 cm focussing distance to subject sounds whooping, but can also interrupt the natural behaviour of live and light. That said, I'm a big fan of Nikons macro mode and started to experiment with my ol' Canon Ixus to increase the macro power (default 10 cm) with cardboard holder and magnify glass. In the tips and tricks section you can see that someone was quite successfull with just a 1$ lense (and my so so lense).
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Old Aug 14, 2003, 9:17 PM   #5
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With the Oly C-3020, it seems that I can get focus lock much closer than 8 inches between the subject and the front element of the lens. This has led me to think that perhaps the 8 inch spec. is from subject to focal plane, which is sort of what I get; guessing of course, at the approximate location of the focal plane within the camera body.

Does anyone know if this is how Oly specs the minimum focus distance?

Also, there is a 'cheat' that you can use with the C-3020 in Macro mode to get 'effectively' closer than the 8 inch minimum. This is to set the focal length to max Wide, position the camera to the minimum 8 inch focal distance (or wherever you get a steady green), then tick the T-W lever (no more than) three times toward Tele. The focus will remain acceptable, and the zoom will decrease the apparent camera-subject distance (increase magnification).
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Old Aug 15, 2003, 2:47 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jawz


Also, there is a 'cheat' that you can use with the C-3020 in Macro mode to get 'effectively' closer than the 8 inch minimum. This is to set the focal length to max Wide, position the camera to the minimum 8 inch focal distance (or wherever you get a steady green), then tick the T-W lever (no more than) three times toward Tele. The focus will remain acceptable, and the zoom will decrease the apparent camera-subject distance (increase magnification).
cool, thanks for the info. I doubt even with this little extra bit of magnification that I will be get clear shots of smaller objects. Even using magnification through a photo editor, once I print out the shots the limitations are pretty clear...
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Old Aug 15, 2003, 3:03 AM   #7
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Default Re: Macro photography

Quote:
Originally Posted by AK
I currently have an Olympus C3020Z, which is a good overall camera. BUT, it's just not good enough for macro shots....

Does anyone have any recommendations for a camera with good image quality and good macro?
So far, the best camera for macro is perhaps Nikon's Coolpix 4500. However, with your C3020Z and close-up lenses, you still can get descent macro shots. As a starter, buy a close-up filter set. Usually, they come with +1, +2 and +4 diopters and the reasonable ones may cost about < $50. See, for example,
http://www.2filter.com/prices/specials.html#Here's%20some%20filters%20to%20help% 20capture%20the%20color%20of You can stack two and no more than close-up lenses for higher magnification. By the way, the concept of using close-up lenses is moving your camera closer to the subject, and, as a result, have higher magnification. To use a close-up lens, set your camera to maximum zoom (i.e., zooming all the way in). Start with a close-up lens and try different combinations to fit your need. Take a look at the "Close-Up" page of my Coolpix 2500 User Guide for more basics and details.

CK
http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam
Nikon Coolpix 950/990/995/2500/4500 User Guide
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Old Aug 15, 2003, 3:55 AM   #8
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Default Re: Macro photography

Quote:
Originally Posted by AK
Hi all,
I currently have an Olympus C3020Z, which is a good overall camera. BUT, it's just not good enough for macro shots....
I had a C32020Z and enjoyed taking flower shots with its macro facility, such as it is.

However, the problem I did hit was lighting. If I wanted to use flash, there wasn't an external synch socket, and the otherwise excellent built-in flash casts a shadow of the lens barrel when attempting really close subjects.

So make sure you get a camera with an external flash sync socket. The Casio QV-5700 I have now is similar in outline to the C3020Z and was very good value. It has all the facilities of the C3020Z and many more, including flash sync and AV output. With 5Mpixels, you can crop to the same resolution as the Olympus, and not need to get so close.
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Old Aug 15, 2003, 9:31 PM   #9
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hey guys, thanks a bunch for the information! I'll have to look into the filters...

cheers

AK
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