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Old Sep 12, 2007, 2:14 AM   #1
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Hi there.

Most of the Indoor Event Expecially Dinner Function they do have Pro Stage Light setting.What's the Tamperature of you to shoot under the strong full light without Flash and with Flash?

Most of the time we'll get those Over Red and even Over Expose on certain colour like RED and Yellow...how to avoid it? use the right Temperature? use the Flash? or....

Please share out..
Thanks
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Old Sep 12, 2007, 7:49 AM   #2
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Set a custom white balance under the same lighting if you can. If you don't have a photographic gray card, a couple of stacked white coffee filters as a target for setting it can get you close.

Or, try incandescent (tungsten). That's usually close for most stage lighting.

If you're getting overexposure, it's probably exposure not white balance. If shooting in non-manual modes, use a -EV setting with Exposure Compensation to get a darker exposure, checking your camera's histogram if it has one until your exposure looks correct. It's not uncommon for the metering to expose too bright for events on a stage (since much of the stage tends to be darker than the lights on the performers and that can fool the metering)

As for flash, that depends on whether or not it's allowed. If it is, and you can get close enough to use it, that can make it easier for you, especially since you typically need a relatively high ISO speed with a bright lens to get photos without one indoors if you don't want motion blur from subject movement. If using a flash, you'll need to set the White Balance for the flash, not the room lighting, if flash is providing most of the light.


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Old Sep 12, 2007, 8:24 AM   #3
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Unless you can get in before the crowd and do a fair amount of experimental shooting, this is the situation that calls for RAW so you can adjust the white balance later. In particular if you are going to mix stage lighting and flash: very unlikely they are the same K. Or some lighting tech might decide that a nice red gell over a spot on the main speaker is a good idea half way through the event.

If you do not have complete knowledge and control of the lighting, shoot RAW.
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Old Sep 12, 2007, 10:08 PM   #4
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Thanks for the expert above to share the experiences...appreciate so much.Actually i did set the WB and Exposure before the show on..and satisfied the mood so...but while loading into computer..over RED and YELLOW..not the exact colour that shown in my LCD.:?:

this is one of the sample..
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Old Sep 12, 2007, 11:00 PM   #5
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But, how did you set it? Use a custom white balance with your 10D, not a specific color temperature (unless you've got something to measure it with or want to try and guess what you need), and without a magenta/green compensation feature, temperature alone still won't get you close enough in some conditions.

Use the camera's custom white balance feature (page 52 of the 10D manual), so that it measures the light from a photographic gray card or white card and applies the correct White Balance (which is basically a set of RGB multipliers) to the photos being taken. Anything white can work in a pinch (for example, a couple of white coffee filters stacked together used for a target under the light you're shooting in, or even some napkins from a table if that's all you have to use).

Or, you can buy white balance type lens caps to set it with (they work by pointing the camera at the light and setting it through a translucent gray cap). Pringles lids used to work. But, they started making them clear. lol But, there are commercial products available for the same thing (for example, Expodisc and others).

You can also get custom cards to set it by that are designed to make the images look warmer if desired.

My guess is that incandescent would have probably got you close. But, a custom white balance is going to be closer (although it may be a bit cooler than desired, you can warm it up a lot easier in PP than you can trying to correct it when it's way off).

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Old Sep 12, 2007, 11:53 PM   #6
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Thanks JimC,

I understand what are you mention above.My problem is..i set the Custom WB after taking a few pcs of photos...then confirm it with the built-in LCD.Problem is,while i transfer into my MacBook Pro..then become the photos shown above...but regarding to the Preview in LCD is exactly what i want..so,what's happening?haa..
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Old Sep 13, 2007, 12:31 AM   #7
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I can't see all of the settings in the EXIF. It shows Quicktime as the software for some reason (or that's what an editor stuffed in it somewhere), and it looks like it stripped out some of EXIF (for example, I can't see the WB setting).

What color space are you using? I'd stick to sRGB (it may be a color management issue, too). But, even if you are shooting sRGB, you really can't go by the camera's LCD.

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Old Sep 13, 2007, 9:47 PM   #8
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I took a look at the photo exif using PhotoME s/w, and the color space is listed as 'uncalibrated', which, I think usually means Adobe RGB. This seems to contribute to the color cast, and the underexposure exacerbates it.

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Old Sep 13, 2007, 9:55 PM   #9
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Hey Brian,

So that's mean..the over RED or so call over Satuation is cause by the under-exposure?
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Old Sep 14, 2007, 12:56 AM   #10
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I think the red color cast is due mostly to the Adobe RGB color space. If your editor is not color space aware, or if it did not convert back to sRGB, then you would get this.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"You said you confirmed the WB on your LCD, which would look OK, since your camera knows the color space. The lack of brightness of the picture could be because your camera LCD is too bright, and it looked good there. Did you check the histogram? It is a better indication of exposure than the LCD image. LCD brightness varies so much with viewing angle, that it isn't reliable. One of the reasons my compurer still has a CRT.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"brian
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