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Old Oct 8, 2007, 8:14 PM   #11
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JohnG wrote:
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When I use my camera I use my left eye. If I shoot a rifle or shotgun I use my right eye!!
You can get into real trouble using a typical firearm with your left eye. Frequently, firearms intended for right handed shooters, are designed to eject spent cartridges out the right side. If a left handed shooter uses the same firearm, if the spent cartridge doesn't hit him or her in the eye, nose or cheek, it will come uncomfortably close. That's why the manufacturers of firearms frequently offer left-handed models on special order.

Camera manufacturers make no such accommodation.
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Old Oct 8, 2007, 9:17 PM   #12
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TCav wrote:
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JohnG wrote:
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When I use my camera I use my left eye. If I shoot a rifle or shotgun I use my right eye!!
You can get into real trouble using a typical firearm with your left eye. Frequently, firearms intended for right handed shooters, are designed to eject spent cartridges out the right side. If a left handed shooter uses the same firearm, if the spent cartridge doesn't hit him or her in the eye, nose or cheek, it will come uncomfortably close. That's why the manufacturers of firearms frequently offer left-handed models on special order.

Camera manufacturers make no such accommodation.
Maybe I should sue Nikon for the dent in my forehead from the wind lever.
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Old Oct 9, 2007, 12:05 PM   #13
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TCav wrote:
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You can get into real trouble using a typical firearm with your left eye. Frequently, firearms intended for right handed shooters, are designed to eject spent cartridges out the right side. If a left handed shooter uses the same firearm, if the spent cartridge doesn't hit him or her in the eye, nose or cheek, it will come uncomfortably close. That's why the manufacturers of firearms frequently offer left-handed models on special order.

Camera manufacturers make no such accommodation.
So firearms manufacturers assume if your right-handed you are automatically right-eyed?

Evidently on the basis of the replies thus far, they're wrong.

Just as well cameras don't eject anythingmetallic and hot when you shoot pictures!
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Old Oct 9, 2007, 12:57 PM   #14
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About the only firearms which have left-hand models, are bolt action rifles. It isn't so much about where the empties are ejected, as ease of use. It is more natural for a leftie to use left hand to operate the bolt.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"If one's master eye is different from hand, there are other ways around the difficulty. With shotguns, the solution is usually a custom stock , with a cast to either left or right, to get the barrel to line up with the master eye.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"With handguns, it is mostly a matter of training, but it does require an instructor who is aware of the challenge, and knows how to deal with it.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"brian
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Old Oct 9, 2007, 1:33 PM   #15
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For handguns, left or right eye dominance doesn't matter much, but for a right handed shooter using a right handed handgun, the action of the spend cartridge being ejected twists the butt into the hand of the shooter. When a left handed shooter holds a right handed handgun, the action of the spend cartridge being ejected twists the butt out of the hand of the shooter. So there is a market for left handed versions of automatic handguns.

(See http://www.sightm1911.com/lib/histor...ll_history.htmfor an example.)

For rifles and shotguns, handedness as well as eye dominance affect how the weapon can best be handled by a shooter, and there are multiple choices available. Opposite eye dominance requires modifications to the stock, as VTphotog says, but there are left handed versions of some weapons available.

(See http://www.remington.com/products/firearms/left-Hand/or http://www.benelliusa.com/firearms/leftHand.tplfor instance.)

Are we off-topic yet?
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Old Oct 9, 2007, 1:49 PM   #16
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Both eyes can be better in some cases.

If you can appreciate a rifle with a low power, long eye relief scope mounted ahead of the bolt, you can track a moving target faster with both eyes open, while still taking advantage of the scope.

At closer ranges, you don't need a higher power scope and the lower magnification with an ahead of the bolt mount makes it easier to use a rifle with both eyes open.

For example, I've got one old Russian made Mosin Nagant (7.62 x 54mm) with a custom stock and heavy bull barrel on it that's been shortened and crowned

I use a Burris 2.5x Long Eye Relief scope mounted ahead of the bolt, and that works great for using it with both eyes open at shorter ranges like you'd typically use one in if you're located in the Southeast U.S.

And yes, we're probably off topic. :-)
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Old Oct 9, 2007, 1:56 PM   #17
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JimC wrote:
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Both eyes can be better in some cases.

If you can appreciate a rifle with a low power, long eye relief scope mounted ahead of the bolt, you can track a moving target faster with both eyes open, while still taking advantage of the scope.
... which is also true for cameras.

(There. Now we're back on topic.) :-)
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Old Oct 9, 2007, 9:52 PM   #18
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There are a lot of similarities in techniques of using cameras and firearms. Using supported positions for longer range shots, steady hold, and so forth.

I have been taking more partridges lately with camera than shotgun, but tracking and follow-through are very much alike. Maybe I should build a shoulder stock for my camera?

brian
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Old Oct 10, 2007, 12:30 AM   #19
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Your dominant eye is important for photgraphy or hunting. Here's a link to an easy test: http://www.usaeyes.org/lasik/library...t-Eye-Test.pdf
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Old Oct 10, 2007, 5:35 PM   #20
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Kalypso wrote:
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Your dominant eye is important for photgraphy or hunting. Here's a link to an easy test: http://www.usaeyes.org/lasik/library...t-Eye-Test.pdf
Agreed. I'm a lefty who uses his left eye because that is my master eye.
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