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Old Aug 28, 2003, 11:53 PM   #1
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Default Why is a 64mb CF card more expensive than a 128mb was?

Hey all!

I was shopping for Compact Flash cards last month when I bought my camera. At that time there was a kingston 128mb CF card for $26 USD with free shipping. A couple weeks ago I checked it again and it was $34 USD with $4 shipping. Today I went back to check it again and I was shocked to find it for $43.50 with free shipping. I can buy a PNY at my grocery store for less.

I then decided to look at the 64mb chips. The 64mb Kingston CF card now sells for $23 USD with $4 Shipping. This means a 64mb card now sells for more than a 128mb did last month!

What is going on?
Dan O.
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Old Aug 28, 2003, 11:58 PM   #2
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Aside from natural price fluctuations, the 64Mb card may have a faster write speed than the 128.

Then again, maybe the days of cheap memory are coming to an end...
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Old Aug 29, 2003, 12:08 AM   #3
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There's usually price increases and artificial sales around back to school time.
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Old Aug 29, 2003, 12:08 AM   #4
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They were the exact same card. The 64mb was just a smaller size, not a slower speed.

I just can't figure this out! It's almost doubled in price in one month!
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Old Aug 29, 2003, 12:13 AM   #5
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There's usually price increases and artificial sales around back to school time.
So what are these "artificial sales"? Are they when they jack up the price and tell you it's really on sale?

I've seen that done at my grocery store. Only a moron would fall for it there. They had a 2 liter of pop "on sale." They said "on sale! $150, was $300"

The world has gone to hell when a 2 liter of pop costs 3 USD! (or there's been one heluva lot of inflation :shock: )
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Old Aug 29, 2003, 12:44 AM   #6
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Chances are its a case of supply and depand and a few other factors. I would think that the 128mb size is most likely the highest volume produces card (or close to) on the market right now and the 64mb card being a little on the small side of thing are on a step production decline. This would mean there would be a high supply of the 128mb card compared to the 64mb cards although I bet that both have around the same demand. An over supply would mean manufactures would lower the price of the product to increase sales.

Given that the actual difference in price of manufacturing from a 64mb card and a 128mb card won't be all that different it would also effect the end price alot. I would be willing to bet that manufacturing a 128mb card actually costs less than a 64mb card right now. Since like with most computer based technolgies and storage based technologies newer, more refined manufacturing processes always come out that allow higher capacities to fit into smaller spaces. When it comes to flash memory the same holds true. Since 64mb moduals are older than 128mb moduals it might be safe to say that the actual memory chips in a 128mb flash memory card could be manufactured on a smaller, more refined processes which because the die area used on a silicon wafer is decreased, the end cost of the chip is also decreased.

I don't want to get really into this, but its fairly common occurance when it comes to memory related products especially. The same could be said as to why a 256mb dimm of pc2100 memory is cheaper than a 256mb dimm of pc133 memory. The pc2100 offers 2x the memory bandwidth compared to the pc133 yet it costs less. The price difference is cause by supply and demand.
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Old Aug 29, 2003, 6:42 AM   #7
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I think it's just supply and demand. I have an older but still working 1 Mpix cam taking max 8Mb Smartmedia. It's becoming more difficult to find these, and the price can be up to 1/2 the price of a 128 card! VOX
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Old Aug 29, 2003, 7:42 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by voxmagna
I think it's just supply and demand. I have an older but still working 1 Mpix cam taking max 8Mb Smartmedia. It's becoming more difficult to find these, and the price can be up to 1/2 the price of a 128 card! VOX
I think you are right. My PC memory used to be cheap until it became outdated. Now I have seen 512 memory for newer configurations sell for less than 256 for mine.
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Old Aug 29, 2003, 9:29 AM   #9
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Anyone here of FTP(Fast page transfer) Ram?

My friend had this really old system a few years back and that's what it required. Of course, all the stores were selling was PC133. So I found it at a small local computer repair store used for $70 for 32mb! :shock:

I don't remember, but I don't believe I bought it.

Of course, the first thing that happens when something goes obsolete is a price drop. This is due to demand dropping while supply remains steady. I had a really bad incident with this phenomenon.

I was rebuilding my PC and bought a 64mb chip of PC133 for $60. I thought I had a good deal, as it was less than a $ a meg. 2 weeks later, DDR came onto the market. My ram dropped to $20 overnight. I was so ticked off! :x

So what has caused the supply/demand model for the CF card market to change this fast? I mean were are talking almost double the price. BTW, the 64mb has gone up as well. I believe it used to sell for $17, but I can't remember about the shipping.

Just a few thoughts and more questions,
Dan O.
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Old Aug 29, 2003, 10:12 AM   #10
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You have to separate any relationship between physical memory size and price. The cost of the packaging, assembly, marketing etc is probably the same, and the actual larger memory is probably not the biggest cost differentiator when R&D has been recovered. But if sellers only need to carry fewer bigger memory lines, mass production cost really come down to hit the 'sweet spot'.

Remember, the biggest use of compact flash is probably in portable music players and demand is very extensible since we all have lots of music! VOX
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