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Old Dec 11, 2007, 2:32 PM   #21
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1eyedeer wrote:
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... very few organisations with large installations regularly carried out a restore function to check data validity due to the disruption caused....
Confirming the validity of a backup isn't difficult or disruptive, and is something that a lot of organizations do regularly.

You simply create a directory somewhere, put some files in it, and let it get backed up as part of the normal procedure. On the following day, you delete the directory, and use the backup to restore it. Five minute job on the first day, and a ten minute job the second day. If it works, you know you cando it, and if it doesn't, you know you've got a problem well in advance of it being critical.
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Old Dec 11, 2007, 2:37 PM   #22
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BillDrew wrote:
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Simply producing fresh backups and keeping them will not do the job since something is likely to have been deleted/modified/overwritten. If you want to keep an archive, the existing one needs to be refreshed, not produce a new one.
That's the difference between an "archive" and a "backup". An archive is something you want preserved in it's original state. A document may well change over the course of time, but you may want to preserve the original. And since the archival medium is fallible, the archive needs to be recreated, not necessarily refreshed.

For instance, you should ARCHIVE the original images as they came from your camera(s), but you should BACKUP the images you're editting, so you won't lose the work you've done. But when you're finished working on them, you may want to ARCHIVE the final result.
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Old Dec 12, 2007, 9:40 AM   #23
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By now Jfserma should have gathered that there is no simple, bullet proof, way of avoiding loosing things - including loosing digital photos. With some care, the probability of loss can be greatly reduced, but never all the way to zero.

Some of the things that can be done are:
* backup/archive many copies
* make them on many different media
* store them in many different places
* update/refresh/recreate the archives/backups frequently
* check the backups/archives to make sure they can be read
* migrate the archives to new media as it becomes available
* go quietly nuts because you only have time to do backups/archives
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Old Dec 12, 2007, 9:48 AM   #24
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BillDrew wrote:
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* go quietly nuts because you only have time to do backups/archives
:-):-):lol::-):-):-):lol::-):-)

("quietly"?!?!?!?)

That usually isn't the goal, but, probably all too often, is the result. :-)
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Old Dec 16, 2007, 1:45 AM   #25
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thanks for all the advice everyone! right now i have my photos on two computers (laptop/desktop), but i'm going to look into putting them online soon.
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