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Old Jan 12, 2008, 4:05 AM   #11
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VTphotog wrote:
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... Doesn't everyone who does backups include an installation file of their raw converter and a viewer on the backup medium?
For which Operating Systems?

For which CPUs?
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Old Jan 12, 2008, 9:21 AM   #12
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TCav wrote:
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VTphotog wrote:
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... Doesn't everyone who does backups include an installation file of their raw converter and a viewer on the backup medium?
For which Operating Systems?

For which CPUs?
I think JimC answered that question very well:
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Because Dave's code is ANSI standard C source, and you can find C compilers for virtually any major processor, ...
Of course that does not deal with the distant future where English is a deader language than Sandscrit, but should be good enough in the short term.
______________
To address the initial question: you should use as many different media as possible, with as many different copies as possible, kept in as as many different places as possible. At some point you do have to figure out how much less than an infinite amount of resources your images are worth.
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Old Jan 12, 2008, 11:17 AM   #13
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One way to preserve the actual prints is to laminate them

with UV stabilized pouches, they should then be preserved

for longer than prints that aren't laminated.:idea:.......musket.
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Old Jan 12, 2008, 3:05 PM   #14
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TCav wrote:
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VTphotog wrote:
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... Doesn't everyone who does backups include an installation file of their raw converter and a viewer on the backup medium?
For which Operating Systems?

For which CPUs?
Since I can emulate older OS with my current setup, I expect I will be able to do so in the future. The Intel chips' instruction sets are basically supersets of previous generations, and will run code for them. Even if this changes, translator programs can be written. (I also still have 5-1/4" floppy drives on one machine)

Computer technology never dies, it just gets archived. One can even d/l emulators for 1970s era video games.

brian
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Old Jan 12, 2008, 5:13 PM   #15
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I threw away my VIC-20 and its cassette tape drive, but somebody bought my 5-1/4" SSDD floppy drive for their C64.
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Old Jan 12, 2008, 6:26 PM   #16
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I still have my VIC20 and cassette tape drive. I wish I didn't sell my C1541 disk drive.

The fun part is migrating images from old format to new format when the old format is no longer supported. I'm pretty sure someone will write a converter assuming he won't get sued or go to jail for violating DMCA in the USA.

For long term storage, use quality archive media. If it is important, make multiple copies on different media and test your archives from time to time. Store some of them offsite so that in case of fire or other natural disaster, you don't lose everything.
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Old Jan 12, 2008, 6:47 PM   #17
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I think we're likely to see SSD (Solid State Drives) become more common in PCs as prices continue to fall, too.

I'm still a bit unclear on the "shelf" life of higher quality Single Level Cell type memory (versus the nice numbers the manufacturers are quoting on number of insertions, MTBF, etc.). I want to know how long those bits are going to stay flipped for archival purposes, and most of the specs are pretty vague on that part.

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Old Jan 12, 2008, 8:16 PM   #18
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I have some QuickTake 100 photos I took as a kid and it took friggin forever to make them into JPGs. It required a proprietary Macintosh plug-in that only operates on legacy Mac OS and I had to use a legacy Mac to convert to JPG, then save to "PC compatible" formatted Iomega Zip disk using SCSI zip drive, then connect the SCSI zip to a PC before transferring to PC.

It was completely dependent on having a legacy Mac with the proprietary plug-in.


When CD-Rs were prohibitively expensive(over a grand), removable HDDs were very popular.

Concerns are: medium longevity, future hardware availability, file and datasystem (i.e. NTFS, FAT32, CDFS) accessibility.

Prior to Zip drives, there were things like SyQuest 44, 88, etc.

In 1999, Zip drives enjoyed an enormous popularity. It started as 100MB, then 250MB and finally 750MB.


From 1998 to now, there's been various removable HDDs, such as SyJet, SparQ and Jazz 1GB, 2GB, but they were all come and go. You can still find SyJet drives at an outrageous price, but in less than 10 years, availability has become scarce and who knows how much longer hardware will remain available. These used latest, proprietary technology only to become obsolete shortly.

I use 3.5" MO for the most critical stuff. It's excruciatingly slow, because it can't keep changing format to meet the latest technology to maintain compatibility, but it has some of the best legacy compatibility. The newest 2.3GB drive is still compatible and can still read at minimum(often read & write) the original 128MB disks from 1992.

The 1.3 & 2.3GB discs are still new standard, so you have to stick with 640MB discs if you want absolute backward compatibility.


I suppose CD-Rs will have devices capable of reading them for a while, but media stability is questionable and they're nowhere near as resilent as MOs.

I'm skeptical of DVD-Rs.
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Old Jan 12, 2008, 11:03 PM   #19
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When CD-Rs first came out, none of the existing CD-ROM drives could read them.

When CD-RWs first came out, most of the existing CD-ROM drives, and only some CD-R drives could read them.

MO has enjoyed a long run, and is likely to continue running for some time. That's because many of its devoted fans are managers of IT departments of Fortune 1000 companies. MOs are quite popular for large near-line data storage systems like jukeboxes.

MO is a good choice for archiving, but few people can afford it for their home computers. If you've got an MO drive or two, and you're using them for archiving, keep it up.

There are lots of ways to back up. I recommend all of them.
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Old Jan 12, 2008, 11:42 PM   #20
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itsme000 wrote:
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I've had CDs and DVDs that worked fine become unreadable after a year or less and I'm not exactly trusting of them.
What were the storage conditions? I have CD-R s from 1998 that are still perfectly readable. They were, at the time the least expensive I could find. Some are music, and others are data - all good. I have found, though, that a great way to destroy them is to hang them outside in the sunlight for a month or two. The overcoating, dye, and even the aluminum falke right off, leaving only the plastic disc itself.

A reasonably temperature controlled environment and minimal light should not be a problem for CDs. Storing in a car in the summer, though will definitely shorten their lives.

One way to preserve the actual prints is to laminate them

with UV stabilized pouches, they should then be preserved


for longer than prints that aren't laminated.:idea:.......musket.

Maybe not. The solvents from inkjets or developers from chemical process prints will be sealed in with the paper as well. I keep mine in albums, but not sealed.

The old advice for storage is probably best - "Store in a cool, dark place."

brian
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