Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Sep 13, 2003, 10:36 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 3
Default Shopping for a new camera. Need many suggestions.

Greetings photo experts!

Boy am I glad I found this wonderful resource!

I really need your help in finding me a great NEW camera. Let me just tell you what I'm after. I'm an ex-journalism major, loved to do reporting-style photos, and still do. At the same time I use it for leisure & media business. Often shoot city scenes. I'm no "artist" if you know what I mean... :lol:

I have a camera Nikon F-70 with a Sigma 25-105 lense that I bought years ago in Moscow for almost US$900.

Right now I want something very powerful, yet easy to use. DIGITAL! (Is it really better to use digital nowadays? What would be the main difference other than shots are taken onto flash memory? What would be the cons and pros of using a digital machine?) and with Great picture quality results.

I'm not following the industry, so I'm totally lost when it comes to even deciding on a camera.

Could you please suggest me what I can get for my current camera (approximate value - it is in its best condition) and what camera would you suggest me to go with? I really want a quality product that delivers excellent results that are not very complex to figure out and manage.

I would greatly appreciate as many suggestions as possible.

PS: Would you recommend to buy a used product?

Thank you!
Artashes
Artashes is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Sep 14, 2003, 12:04 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 156
Default

Thats a pretty tough one to answer. Asking what digital camera is best is like asking what car is best. What price range, what features, big, small, what type of performance (you will notice I didn't say best performance, I said type of performance, luxury car or sports car or compact ....). There are a lot of advantages of digital over film (and film has it's advantages). Two of the bigest advantages to digital are it is free to shoot and instant feedback. While the little lcd's on digital cameras will not reveal what a computer screen will, they can still tell you a lot about what you got. Exposure, composition, focus. Rather than having to use filters/diffrent films for diffrent lighting, a lot of that can be done with your camera. Not sure about a shot? Shoot it again, or shoot it a few times, and select the best when you view it on your computer (shoting is free).
Perhaps you should consider what your budget is and weather you want dslr or fixed/variable fixed (prosumer I guess). It might make it easier for people to help if you gave a beter idea of what you want and what you can spend. More specifically, what type of shooting could help too.
richardh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 14, 2003, 10:13 AM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 3
Default

Thank you Richard very much.

Well, to give some more information you've mentioned:

My budget is $500-550 + whatever my old camera is worth (Nikon F70).

Type of shooting/performance: Reporting.

Result is what magazines like Fortune and Time have on their pages (or at least close enough). I totally understand that those big guys shoot with thousands-dollar cameras, so I can't really wait for the same quality photo, but still it would be nice to make it as close as possible.

I don't care about the camera size - I actually prefer a bigger professional-size one instead of what my little sister has to shoot her toys on the backyard.

In the last 2 days I've been all over reviews, consumer's feedback, cameras... But it seems like its confusing me more about what to get. Looked Nikon, Canon G series, Sony...

Also an important question: do digital cameras have lenses to change? or is it just one for everything? If yes, then its better to take the 8x?
Artashes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 14, 2003, 10:14 AM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 3
Default

By the way. what is "dslr or fixed/variable fixed"?

Thanks.
Artashes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 14, 2003, 7:31 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 386
Default

Dslr stands for digital slr, you know cameras that are only a body, the entire lense can be removed (I'm not doubting your experience, but one never knows writters photographic mother language)

Fixed focal lenght or just fixed stands for non zoom lense = most of times better pictures than low budget zoom.

For city scenes a fast responsive camera is a must Without that you still can shoot an outstanding picture but it might also take endless random shooting to get only 1 right.

For city scenes a camera with higher sensitivity (iso values) is recommended to capture not only a sunny plaza but also the start of evening.

For city scenes a very compact camera can be handy to steel a moment unnoticed. However most compact cameras have less battery juice and somewhat lower performance or more complex menus. Which means you have to turn camera on and off all the time or run 3 batterys flat in only 1 hour. And every manual setting might need some menu operations instead of obvious knob.

Personally I would recommend Fuji S602 it is not small but it is pretty fast. However the Fuji S602 has more than average barrel distortion at one end of zoom, meaning buildings will get bended. You can also wait till the D-slr price implosion has settled, I expect the Canon eos 300D (d-slr) cost around $750 next year...and maybe go in the meantime for the cheapest serious sollution?
Mathilde uP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 14, 2003, 9:16 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
JanetKP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 247
Default

I suggest the Canon G5 (5 meg).

I use the G2 (4 meg) and after two years, I am still having great creative fun using all the functions and options. The quality of images and prints is exceptional. My business is selling a Cd-ROM on gardening, I shoot plants, and I can't fault the G2 on image quality - and the G5 is even better.

The Canon 'G' series can be a point-and-shoot in auto mode, or be used in manual mode, as well as many other modes, to satisfy all creative needs.

Mind you, I am somewhat biased. My first digicam was a Sony Mavica. Loved it, but am now totally sold on the Canon optics.
JanetKP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 14, 2003, 9:47 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 386
Default

Janet KP: Is the Canon G5 quick and prompt responsive to shutterbutton press?

With all respect flora journalism and also the G5, I think the camera requirement for city reportages is a bit different than for plants. Atleast I assume plants never go ino a rave, summer break or rush hour to the metro ;-)
Mathilde uP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 15, 2003, 10:45 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
JanetKP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 247
Default

Mathilde, quite right. Plants rarely get into a frenzy, but wildlife does, and I've managed some very decent shots. (^J^)

The Canon G2,3 and 5 line offer many setting options to accommodate the photographers whims and needs. Why not visit a good camera shop and try a few makes out. You can view the results on the LCD.

Good hunting.
JanetKP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 15, 2003, 12:22 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 156
Default

For the kind of shooting you are wanting to do, I think a dslr would be best. I am not sure what you can get for your nikon, but a dslr might be to far out of your price range (it's certainlly out of mine). This recently released camera is about the cheapest dslr there is.
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneos300d/
It is a dslr that has interchangable lenses like your nikon. Unless I am mistaken it can take the same lenses as some canon film slr's so there is a wide range avalable.
On a cheaper budget, the canon g series ar an exelent camera. The review linked to above has a comparison between it and the g5. The g series defanatlly offer good picture quality and camera capabilities for the money. You can also use teleconverters and wide angle converters on the g series using an adapter. The adapter is basically a tube thet extends out past the cameras own lens. You can then mount a secondary lens on the tube. Say for instance you get a 2x teleconverter and put it on a g3. The g3 is 35mm-140mm 35mm equivalent from its 4x zoom (it would be the same as a 35mm-140mm lens on your nikon). The 2x teleconverter would change this to 70mm-280mm. A wide angle converter would do the oppisite of course. Be aware though, using a teleconverter in this manner does not give as good of optical quality as using an interchangable lens like on an slr/dslr. You can also use various filters and macro lenses on a g series. If budget forces you to a prosumer camera like the g series, you can still get a ittle bit of lens flexability, though not with the same quality of an slr.
As far as response speed of the cameras, I am not super farmiliar with dslr's as they are out of my price range, but I have been leed to believe they perform much faster than prosumer cameras.
richardh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 15, 2003, 12:36 PM   #10
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 24
Default

Hi all,

The G5 has dropped in price since the introduction of the 300D. The G5 has gone down to $1099 (Canadian) from $1199 last week. I'd assume prices on other digital cameras at this end will see some price decreases... I'd suggest you buy your camera from a place that has a Price Match Promise. For instance, Blacks in Canada promises to match a price for 60 days... so if you buy the camera and the price goes down, you can go back into the store to get the difference back (with a receipt of course and a few other conditions)

Most of the major Canadian camera companies offer similar offers, and I'd assume that American companies do the same.

Cheers,
Ken

Quote:
Originally Posted by richardh
For the kind of shooting you are wanting to do, I think a dslr would be best. I am not sure what you can get for your nikon, but a dslr might be to far out of your price range (it's certainlly out of mine). This recently released camera is about the cheapest dslr there is.
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneos300d/
It is a dslr that has interchangable lenses like your nikon. Unless I am mistaken it can take the same lenses as some canon film slr's so there is a wide range avalable.
On a cheaper budget, the canon g series ar an exelent camera. The review linked to above has a comparison between it and the g5. The g series defanatlly offer good picture quality and camera capabilities for the money. You can also use teleconverters and wide angle converters on the g series using an adapter. The adapter is basically a tube thet extends out past the cameras own lens. You can then mount a secondary lens on the tube. Say for instance you get a 2x teleconverter and put it on a g3. The g3 is 35mm-140mm 35mm equivalent from its 4x zoom (it would be the same as a 35mm-140mm lens on your nikon). The 2x teleconverter would change this to 70mm-280mm. A wide angle converter would do the oppisite of course. Be aware though, using a teleconverter in this manner does not give as good of optical quality as using an interchangable lens like on an slr/dslr. You can also use various filters and macro lenses on a g series. If budget forces you to a prosumer camera like the g series, you can still get a ittle bit of lens flexability, though not with the same quality of an slr.
As far as response speed of the cameras, I am not super farmiliar with dslr's as they are out of my price range, but I have been leed to believe they perform much faster than prosumer cameras.
KenKosowan is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 1:09 PM.