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Old Feb 18, 2008, 10:24 PM   #1
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Hope I'm not commiting some "cardinal sin" by asking more questions about film in this forum. But here goes...

When they are talking about color slide film and mention "transparancies" they are referring to what most people know of as "slides"?

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Old Feb 18, 2008, 10:49 PM   #2
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DarkDTSHD wrote:
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When they are talking about color slide film and mention "transparancies" they are referring to what most people know of as "slides"?
Correct! One and the same, although transparancies could mean something larger than 24x36mm for overhead projector for example (remember thoses things before video projectors?)
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Old Feb 18, 2008, 11:21 PM   #3
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NHL wrote:
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DarkDTSHD wrote:
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When they are talking about color slide film and mention "transparancies" they are referring to what most people know of as "slides"?
Correct! One and the same, although transparancies could mean something larger than 24x36mm for overhead projector for example (remember thoses things before video projectors?)
Yep. That's where I know the word "transparancies" from. Overheads back in grade school. Hence my question.

Btw...is it me or are slide projectors no longer made? I checked out Kodak's site and it says all models had been discontinued after 2004.
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Old Feb 18, 2008, 11:36 PM   #4
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FYI - http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/catego...rojectors.html
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Old Feb 18, 2008, 11:54 PM   #5
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NHL wrote: Thanks man. Now I just got to find local retailers stocking Vivitar, Braun...etc....slide projectors.

On to other things...
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Old Feb 19, 2008, 1:53 AM   #6
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Why is "color slide film" popular among film photographers? Do the transparancies last longer than film negatives? Quite simply why "color slide film" and not only "color negative film"?

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Old Feb 19, 2008, 6:20 AM   #7
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You trying to start a fight?

Basically, color slide film is oversaturated and way too contrasty (limited dynamic range) to look anywhere near natural. These traits are what endear it to prople who grew up in McDs restaurants seeing only bright primary colors. Those of us who prefer subtle gradations and a natural look, always shot negative film. :evil::-) and then there were all those relatives with their Kodak carousel projectors and armed guards to prevent escape.

Seriously, though, this was one of the more fun aspects of shooting film - arguing about which was better, slide or negative. The different characteristics lent themselves to different types and styles of photography.

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Old Feb 19, 2008, 7:12 AM   #8
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Back in the "olden times," before just about everyone had a computer in the home, the easiest way to show off pictures to a bunch of relatives or friends was to invite them over and give 'em a slide show. You could pass a stack of prints around, but then you have to sit there with each viewer and tell him/her who was who and what was what in each picture, or let them figure it out.

You could have prints made from slides, but (again, in olden times, before scanners) it involved making an "internegative" from the slide, then printing from the internegative in the usual way. This extra step could degrade quality a bit, but it did the job. These days, you can put either type of film in a scanner and get prints of equal quality.

As far as dynamic range goes, I think slide and negative films were and are pretty equal--but you can do things like dodging and burning when making a print, and you can't do that while developing slide film. When shooting slide film, you have to get the exposure right the first time, too; with negative film, you could be off a fair bit and compensate when making prints. I think shooting slide film teaches you to be more aware of the lighting conditions and makes you learn more about exposure than if you only shoot negative film, and when I started using a digital camera, it really reminded me of shooting slides--it made me a lot more aware of how much correction has to be done if you don't nail it in the camera.
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Old Feb 19, 2008, 8:41 AM   #9
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Even further back in the dark ages, you paid a lot more to have print film (negative film) developed AND printed so experts suggested taking slides and then choosing the ones to have prints made from. Also way back then, they had reversal (direct slide to print)color photographic paperso an internegative and its attendent generation quality loss was not needed.

Mass production changed all that. Economies of scale, including one hour photo machines in camera stores and drugstores,brought down costs of developing and printing and reprinting of color* negative film. Thus slide film dropped in popularity except for folks who did auditorium presentations. (I was one of the latter, presenting slides of streetcars and trains to a railroad club.)

All the way back then, too, slides of any size were also referred to as transparencies.

Digital camera hints: http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/digicam.htm

*Black and white filmis now a specialty item andcosts considerably more to process than common (C-41 process) color film.




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Old Feb 19, 2008, 10:36 AM   #10
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Thanks guys for posting. Appreciate the answers!

I suppose some photographers might prefer the oversaturated look of color slide film. Or maybe I should say "more saturated" look. Especially "fine art photographers".

I could see how having color slides today could still be useful and fun. Wouldn't it be more enjoyable to be able to look back at your photos on a 80" screen compared to your 30" monitor? I think so. And I suppose they would be easier to store compared to reems of color negative strips. Or the prints from color negative film. I mean that's the only way to view your shot. Whereas with "transparancies" you have the "finished product". Even if you could make prints from transparancies too.

Tempting to go back and start shooting in film again. Do you guys still shoot in film in addition to digital?

And what's wrong with going for a BigMac every now and then?? Colorful decor and all.
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