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Old Sep 17, 2003, 8:15 PM   #11
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Another solution (albeit more costly) is to get a camera with image stabilization...these are mostly found on cameras that have long zoom lenses. Here's how Canon's technology worked on the Canon Pro90IS and the Olympus C-2100UZ:

http://www.canon.com/technology/deta...ift/index.html
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Old Sep 19, 2003, 11:58 AM   #12
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Thank you everyone I have just started experimenting with these techniques and things have started looking better. Between these tips and some more shooting I may start getting some shots I don't want to delete right away

Right now I am shooting with an Olympus D-510. Not the fanciest camera out there but decent. The more I learn about it the more I am able to do with my photos. However I am really looking forward to getting an Olympus C-2100uz. Just a matter of stringing together enough paychecks.

Thanks again


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Old Sep 20, 2003, 1:15 PM   #13
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Well, here's another 2 cents worth. I used to shoot target rifles as a lad and we were taught a particular stance for offhand shooting. It works well for photography (with the added attraction that you are allowed to lean your "off" shoulder against a solid object in photography which was a definite no-no in riflery <G>!)

First, you stand somewhat sideways to what you want to shoot (left side "forward" if you are right handed). Then you put the lens in your left hand (I hold onto the lens itself so that I can zoom, focus etc.). Splay your left hip forward (by putting your weight on your left foot and moving at the waist so that your hip makes sort of like a little shelf), and put your left elbow as tight to your body as you can with your left hand still under the lens. You now have a pretty stable hold on your camera and hand shake should have little effect on the situation.

Now you need to realize that you won't be able to hold a (heavy) camera really still (just as we can't hold a heavy rifle still), so don't try. Instead, pan the camera slowly back and forth in a horizontle position (I mean really slowly here). By trying to move slowly in only one plane you will likely be able to limit your movement to that plane and that speed. (If you try to hold still, you will make a lot of little jerky movements that are killers for sharp slow speed photos.) As you get the composition that you want in the viewfinder, let your breath out naturally and then hold it. Squeeze the trigger -- er, shutter -- and the shot is yours!

I have been able to take a number of very sharp hand held pictures with a pretty large 70-200 F 2.8 lens at shutter speeds well below 1/2 second with this method -- and I am an older git who is having trouble holding his hands still these days (age is a bitch!)

YMMV. In any event, it's worth a try.

Best,
<TED>


Quote:
Originally Posted by richardh
Another thing that can help if the shot will allow it is to lay the top portion of one or both of your arms against your body so that your elbow is touching your stomach or thereabouts. It is kind of akward at first but with your arms laying against your body and just your forarms coming out holding the camera, your body stabalizes your arms. This is best with a swivel lcd too, but if you do not have one, hold the camera higher and lock your focus and exposure(halfpress the shutter) and then move to this position (even at a slight angle, you should be able to see enough on the lcd to get composititn).
If you can shoot with one hand, extend one arm out with the camera and put the other arm down like this. Rest the wrist of the extended arm in the hand of the arm that is against the body for stability.
Just something to try that sometimes works for me anyway.
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Old Sep 21, 2003, 5:15 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tedj101
Well, here's another 2 cents worth. I used to shoot target rifles as a lad and we were taught a particular stance for offhand shooting. It works well for photography (with the added attraction that you are allowed to lean your "off" shoulder against a solid object in photography which was a definite no-no in riflery <G>!)

YMMV. In any event, it's worth a try.

Best,
<TED>

The way that I hold my arms Is actually adapted from things I learned when I took tactical pistol and tactical riffle courses (from Chuck Taylor if anybody knows who that is). There are several similarities between the ability to hold a firearm steady and the ability to hold a camera steady, and the methods employed.
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