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Old Mar 11, 2008, 4:07 PM   #11
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JimC wrote:
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guppies wrote:
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I have 2 extra micro 2g sd (kingston). I can use them on other P&S camera or use it as a backup or testing it on the D40
If you've already got some micro sd cards, I'd see how they work in it using the adapter.

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Humm, I should take the SD card out from my D40 and check on my PC see the D40 format the card is FAT16 or FAT32 (just for information and good to know too)
It would probably just maintain the original card format (they come preformatted), or maintain however you formatted one last.

IOW, if they were formatted as FAT16 (which is the way they'd come for 2GB or smaller cards), the would probably reformat one that way to keep the same file system it's already formatted as. For cards larger than 2GB, FAT32 is needed.

Hello JimC,

Not very sure what you mean ?

"If you've already got some micro sd cards, I'd see how they work in it using the adapter."

What I did is. I format the micro sd card again using the D40 format function in the camera. And I format another micro card to FAT32 using my laptop and copy 735 pictures into it and work on my digital picture frame. To make sure the micro Sd card work. That's all so far

I call Nikon a few min ago and they say they test the D40 using 4G sd card. Not sure about the 8G they say...humm !

Anyway, I will get 2 - 4G and test it.

One more question ! I see Sandisk have one call "Ultra II" and one call "Extreme III"

which one should I try ? look's like Extreme III is with faster speed.


Thanks !



Guppies




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Old Mar 11, 2008, 4:22 PM   #12
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As I've already mentioned, their tested cards list was last updated in 2006. Manufacturers do not constantly test newer cards after a camera is introduced (and 4GB cards were the largest you normally saw a couple of years ago).

Now, 16GB SDHC cards are commonly available. But, it's unlikely Nikon is going to test them in an older camera model like the D40. I have seen users report 8GB SDHC cards work fine. But, I haven't noticed anyone that's used a 16GB SDHC card in a D40 yet (although they'd probably work OK, too).

As for the Sandisk cards you're asking about, the Extreme III is the faster card. But, I don't know if it would be faster than the Ultra II in your camera model or not (since the camera is sometimes the bottleneck, versus the speed of the card).

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Old Mar 11, 2008, 11:35 PM   #13
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The question that hasnt been addressed was is it better to buy 2 2gb or 1 4gb?

I could ask is it better to buy 4 512mb than 1 2gb? Well, it depends if you shoot lots of RAW and videos, then stick with 2gb+.
If mostly jpg with economy 4-6mp with a P&S, then stay with 512mb or 1gb. Cards could go bad, be damaged, formatted, or lost, and losing 200 pics on a 512mb card is better than losing 800pics on a 2gb card.
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Old Mar 12, 2008, 8:02 AM   #14
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romphotog wrote:
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The question that hasnt been addressed was is it better to buy 2 2gb or 1 4gb?
I personally prefer using a card that's large enough so that I don't have to worry about swapping cards while shooting.

From my perspective, you're just as likely to damage a card or camera from removal and insertion of cards if you need to switch them while shooting (not to mention the possibility of losing one).

For example, I'm using a Transcend 16GB card in my Sony A700 now. But, I still carry spare cards. That's why I mentioned this in my first post:

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I would suggest having more than one card. Failures do happen, even with the best brands, and it's good to have a spare.
It sounds like the OP already has some 2GB Micro SD cards that could be used (via the adapter included with most Micro SD Cards). So, I'd see if those are sufficient before worrying about more cards. If shooting JPEG, you can fit a lot of photos on a 2GB card with a 6MP model.

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Old Mar 12, 2008, 9:45 AM   #15
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From Jim C's post above

Personally, I avoid Ridata/Ritek cards. I also avoid Kingston, even more so than most other brands (although many people like them). Lately, I've been sticking with Sandisk, Lexar, or Transcend (but, only the Transcend cards with a lifetime warranty). But, I do have other brands that I have experienced no issues with (including Toshiba and PNY cards).

I have used Fuji brand xD cards and am using PQI, Sandisc and TranscendCFards at this point. The 16GB 133x Transcend card is a great card that Jim C recommended. it took some reformatting in my PC to make it work but its great in my Fuji S-9100.

dave
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Old Mar 12, 2008, 9:57 AM   #16
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I've got PQI cards that have worked just fine, too. Ditto for a few other brands.

The main reason I avoid Kingston and Ridata/Ritek is because of compatiblity issues resulting in very slow speeds with some of their CcmpactFlash Cards in some Konica Minolta camera models, and I know someone that had 2 SD cards from Kingston that failed in a short period of time (he gave the 3rd replacement away to someone else), and I've seen similar reports from others. lol

I've seen similar reports of compatiblity issues using some of Kingston's cards in other camera models, too (for example, some of them won't work in Kodak DSLR models, apparently because of the type of controller Kingston used in some of their cards). You also saw issues with some of the Kingston cards in some Canon models. For example, some of the Kingston Elite Pro series cards wouldn't record video without errors in the Canon S1 IS when it was first released (but, Canon released a firmware upgrade that solved it). Some still won't work right in KM DSLR models (*very* slow write speeds using some of the Kingston Elite Pro cards, which are even slower than Kingston's standard speed cards in these cameras), and I've seen the same thing reported with some of the Ridata/Ritek cards in these cameras.

But, you see failures and compability issues with any brand, and most are probably using some of the same components. Also, the cards that were more reliable a few years back, may not be the brands that are more reliable now. Even with the same brand/model of card, manufacturers sometimes change the components being used along the way. So, it's difficult to say if one is going to hold up better than another. Hence, why I've tended to stick with cards that have a lifetime warranty lately.

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