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Old Mar 30, 2008, 4:22 PM   #1
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Most of the point and shoot digital cameras that I have used, Nikon ones in particular, enforce a brief delaywhile capturing photos. You are required to hold the camera steady still for about a second after you click it, in order to get a clear photo. In case if the objects or the hand shakes during this period, you are bound to get a blur. I have tried using the Nikon Coolpix 5400 andL10 and Sony Cybershot series.

What are the factors affecting this ? and what are the reasons? Are there any ways that this can be minimized in the above cameras? What points do I keep in mind for this when buying my next camera? This delaycan bevery frustrating when you need those spur-of-the-moment photos .

Thanks in advance.
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Old Mar 30, 2008, 4:33 PM   #2
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Without having more details and maybe seeing a few pics, one can't say for sure, but usually, the conditions you are describing are the result of too slow a shutter speed. The longer the shutter remains open, the more chance for camera and/or subject movement, which results in blurry pics.

The best way to minimize this condition is to increase the shutter speed. Normally, pictures taken in the 1/250 sec and above range are blur free (unless you're taking sports or action pics, which would require in the range of 1/500 sec). If conditions are less than favorable (e.g., low lighting), you may have to increase the ISO to permit the faster shutter speed.

Why don't you post a couple of pics (directly to this forum - not through a web site), so we can take a look.

the Hun

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Old Mar 30, 2008, 4:44 PM   #3
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self_anonymous wrote:
Quote:
Most of the point and shoot digital cameras that I have used, Nikon ones in particular, enforce a brief delaywhile capturing photos. You are required to hold the camera steady still for about a second after you click it, in order to get a clear photo. In case if the objects or the hand shakes during this period, you are bound to get a blur. I have tried using the Nikon Coolpix 5400 andL10 and Sony Cybershot series.

What are the factors affecting this ? and what are the reasons? Are there any ways that this can be minimized in the above cameras? What points do I keep in mind for this when buying my next camera? This delaycan bevery frustrating when you need those spur-of-the-moment photos .

Thanks in advance.
Elbows against body for steadying, press shutter release button half way

down to focus, allow camera time to adjust it's settings, there is often a

bleep when it's ready(usuallythe freq of a bleep that older people can't hear, in that case just count to 3)

then breath out slowly and at the end of your breath press the buttonslowly down

the rest of the way to capture the scene......................:|...........musket.
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Old Mar 31, 2008, 9:25 PM   #4
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I agree with the Hun and musket as far as strategies go for minimizing blurred shots due to camera shake or subject movement. But, it looks to me as if you are wondering why there is a camera delay in the first place when you push the shutter release button.

The delay you describe is called shutter lag. When you press the shutter release, the camera has to do a lot of things before it's ready to capture the shot: It has to calculate the exposure and set the shutter speed and/or the lens aperture -- and even the ISO in some modes. It also has to focus the lens, save the shot to the memory card and possibly charge and discharge the flash. That's a lot of stuff to do.

Point 'n shoot cameras usually have significantly greater shutter lag than DSLR's due to less sophisticated hardware.

I don't know specifically what you can do to minimize this lag in the two cameras mentioned, but in general, if the camera has a continuous focus mode, using it should make some difference. Most cameras will focus when you push the shutter release halfway down. This saves battery power but can make the focusing time longer. If you're pretty sure that something worth photographing is going to happen in a certain area, you can pre-focus on that area and then engage focus lock -- again, if your camera has this feature. Then when you go to take the shot, the camera is already focused for that general distance.

You can also try burst mode. That won't help much for the initial exposure, but subsequent shots will be taken way faster than that first shot. It helps to anticipate the action, too, either for single shots or for burst mode.

I don't know about the Nikon 5400, but my 5700 has a menu setting under the Shutter Release Speed heading called Quick Response. It reduces lag time but results in poorer display quality (of the LCD screen and/or electronic viewfinder display).

What points to keep in mind in selecting a new camera with faster response? Look at the reviews. Most decent reviews will include a measurement of shutter lag time.
I think that many -- if not most -- recently produced point 'n shoots have lower shutter lag than the Nikon 5400 due to hardware improvements. I don't know where the others you mentioned fall on the modern speed curve. There is at least one posted article identifying point 'n shoots with superior lag times, so let Google be your friend.

Get a DSLR for the best speed.

Grant
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Old Apr 2, 2008, 9:39 PM   #5
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Thanks for the response everybody. I understand the blurring part since it is natural for the hand or the object to shake a little and that this little is big enough to confuse thesensor.

Hey "Grant" and "the Hun" - thanks for explaining all that stuff. Shutter speeds!!! thats the culprit after all. I spent some time googling around and I now know what all things to look for in my new cam. Thanks again.
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Old Apr 2, 2008, 9:41 PM   #6
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If you have an more Q's, feel free...

the Hun

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