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Old Apr 29, 2008, 6:48 AM   #1
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[suP]Hi . Wanted to know what do owners / users think ofthe sigma 10-20 or other ultra wide lenses,is it a must have .:idea:Or do you find its not used very much:idea: before I buy (probably a Sigma 10-20)for my Nikon D40. I thankyou .[/suP]
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Old Apr 29, 2008, 7:26 AM   #2
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As I would expect, according to photodo.com [http://www.photodo.com/product_1118_p2.html ], the Sigma 10-20 seems to be best suited for landscape and architecture work. And the people there havea lot of nice things to say about it [http://www.photodo.com/product_1118_p3.html ].

Others considered the Tamron 11-18 and the Tokina 12-24, and the comments on those lenses are an interesting read.

[See http://www.photodo.com/product_536_p3.html] [Seehttp://www.photodo.com/product_495_p3.html ]
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Old Apr 29, 2008, 8:19 AM   #3
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I just got this lens a few months ago. I got to use it extensively on a business trip in early March, and I really enjoy using. It is sharp, and focuses fast, and has great color and contrast. Blues look especially great, and I don't have to use a polarizer to get that deep blue color, which is good, since you really would need to use a thin filter to avoid vignetting. It does have pretty complex distortion at 10mm, but it can be improved slightly through lens correction software (I use pt lens).

If you're a landscape shooter, or need to shoot wide interiors, or just like to play around, I think an ultrawide is must have. That being said, it takes some learning to use this lens well...it's not just about shooting wide..you have to learn how to communicate and show the depth that this lens can provide in your images for it to be really effective.
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Old Apr 29, 2008, 8:20 AM   #4
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I've used this lens on a Nikon D70s and D300 and have always been very happy with the results.

If you stuff yourself in the corner of the room you can get all four walls in the photo!


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Old Apr 29, 2008, 9:40 AM   #5
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Thanks for advice so farand all replies, Seems you have to think differently using this lens is that what its about, is that correct is it that it does not work with some types of photo,any examples or any ground rules that meannot all scenes or landscapes are suitablewith these ultra wide lenses .

I believe I hoped the 10-20 could possibly do the following type of shots

I imagined I could take in future if I had a 10-20 for exampletropical exotic beaches with palm trees and showing expances of sea, thattype of shots orthousands of houses in a villagelooking from a high point downlanscapes, miles of mountainscapes looking up, vast jungle uplandsand tea plantation shots towering above,huge towering waves hitting giant iceburgs scenes, thousands of wilderbeasts thundering over the plains, allthings like thatis whatI would love to capture better than I could with my18mm wideon lenses I havenow.Thank you for any more advice / pictures of the above scenes would be great.
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Old Apr 29, 2008, 9:45 PM   #6
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As you've indicated the only limit is your imagination!

18mm gives about 75 degree field of view across the diagonal while 10mm is about 109 degrees. Tipping the camera up or down can introduce "keystoning", rectangular objects such as buildings appear trapezoid or wedge shaped. This may or may not be to your taste and is not a design defect but a function of the field of view.
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Old Apr 29, 2008, 9:50 PM   #7
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The key to using this lens for landscapes is having good foreground elements to convey a sense of depth. Without depth images will look very flat. It's not just how much you can fit in....it's showing near, middle and far. Without depth, the main subject will just look far away.
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Old May 4, 2008, 2:34 PM   #8
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I think that you will find the wide angle very useful - given that your already interested in it. As pointed out before there is the Tamron 11-18 and the Tokina 12-24. The Pentax 12-24 is very highly rated and is essentially the same lens as the Tokina 12-24, so you can search for comments on the Pentax lens and apply them to the Tokina.

Here is a revie across all the 10/12 to 20/24 wide angle lenses
http://kenrockwell.com/tech/digital-...comparison.htm

... and here is a whole list of additional comments
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q...=Google+Search


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Old May 31, 2008, 11:13 AM   #9
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Just back from New Zealand where I used ithe Sigma 10-20 a lot. I think a tripod is necessary as I did not found it as sharp of my only other lens, a Nikkor 50mm 1.8d which is a few times cheaper.

I have also had a hard timeobtaining properly focusedpics from 0 to infinity, but that must be because I am a newbie.

If you like architecture, i would say that 10mm is amazing as you can stand on the same side of sidewalk that the house you want to make a picture of, and still see the whole house.

So... 10-20mm angle is great on a scenery trip or architecture or real estate, but maybe not that specific Sigma lens. Or maybe not that specific photographer (me) :-)

Don't forget of course that you have to work on distortion on Photoshop... I show here 2 of my pics with the distortion.



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Old May 31, 2008, 11:14 AM   #10
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Another one


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