Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 2, 2008, 5:27 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 9
Default

HI ... ive just bought a Canon 400D and am really really happy with it.

I Undersatnd Apperture and Shutter settings but how does one change the tone of the picture? i read in the manual and know that i can press the Av button and move the main dial to make the picture over or underexposed. but how can i use partial metering (ie read it ) to changethe tone of the picture?

is it even important ?


ahmed Niz is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old May 2, 2008, 5:56 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,544
Default

Are you taking photos that have a color cast to them? Do they have a consitant yellow or blue shade to them?

That would be 'white balance'. Incadescent bulbs cast a yellowish light, while florescent blubs cast a bluish light. The human brain is smart enough to correct for that, but cameras aren't. So you have to correct for it in the camera or in post processing.

If that's not what you're talking about, then there's some basic stuff you can do in the camera. See the Picture Style Menu, explained on page 63 of your manual.

Beyond that, I think you'll have to do what you want in post processing (i.e.: use an image editting application like Photoshop, Paint Shop Pro, or IrfanView) to get what you want.

Can you post an example of what you want to do?
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 2008, 8:03 AM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 9
Default

What i mean is, that whever i read about exposure and about taking good and creative photographs ... all articles and web sites talk about exposure and tone settings . I know how to play with apperture and shutter speeds and what buttons to press in the camera to have an over or under exposed pic .....

... however, all these articles talk about spot or partial metering and how a good photogrpher uses them and overrides them,

so the question is :how do i, on my 400Duse partial mereting ? is it importat? when ive set apperture/ set the shutter speed/ looked at the exposure level .... where does partial metering or any other metering come into place ??

how will i set it ? how do i read it ? it doesnt explain in the guide book ?

also the sites and articles talk about taking readings from two main spots, for example the sky and the mountain in a landscape pic...

how do i take this reading ?

the more i read the more confused i get ... all im doing now is playing with apperture and shutter speeds to get a decent pic ...also i use the exposure meter to get a dark or a ligheter pic .... how the hell do i use a pertial meter now ?
ahmed Niz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 2008, 8:17 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,544
Default

What you're talking about is 'Metering Mode'.

Your camera has a built-in light meter that measures how much light there is in the frame and determineswhat ISO setting, Aperture and Shutter Speed to use tocreate the proper exposure. On page 73 of your manual, it discusses the differnet metering modes you can use.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 2008, 9:44 AM   #5
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

In a nutshell, the difference between all the metering modes is in how much of the frame they consider when they determine proper exposure.

For instance spot metering says - only consider this very tiny portion of the frame when determining proper exposure - I don't care what is in the rest of the frame.

Partial says "hey only use this center portion of the frame when determining the proper exposure"

Center weighted says "look at the whole frame but give extra weight to what is in the center"

Evaluative looks at the entire frame and determines the best exposure taking everything into account.



What you as the photographer have to decide is: which mode makes the most sense for a given subject.

And beyond that, when you're taking the shot, given the metering mode you're in - when do you think the camera is going to get the exposure incorrect? That is when you need to use exposure compensation.

I'll give you an example - I do a lot of sports photography. When I shoot a sport where the subjects where helmets I know the faces are going to be in shadow. If I'm not shooting manual exposure, I'll shoot AV with partial metering - thus the camera considers only what is in the center of the frame. In this manner, the camera does not consider the bright sky behind the player. If I allowed the camera to consider the sky it would choose a different exposure to keep the highlights in the sky from being blown out. My main subject would thus be too dark. So, by limiting the exposure to just what's in the center my subject is exposed properly. HOWEVER, the subject's face is in deep shadow because of the helmet. That face isn't in the exact center of the frame. So I will use exposure compensation to force the camera to over-expose so I can see the face. The result may be that if they are wearing white uniforms the highlights in those uniforms are blown out. To me, that's OK. I want to see a face - I don't care about the uniform. How much EC I use depends on the lighting and the shadows - there's no magical answer. Experience tells me what to use.

Notice there are highlights on the uniform and helmet and background blown out - but the face is exposed well:



That's just one example - every aspect of photography will have instances where the photographer needs to intervene and tell the camera to over or under-expose the shot. The different metering modes are there so the camera can make a better guess - but ultimately it's still just a computer. So there are situations where it will guess wrong.
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 4:23 AM.