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Old Sep 28, 2003, 6:43 PM   #11
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P.S.: Nice pic Kalypso!
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Old Sep 28, 2003, 7:07 PM   #12
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Well, you have to practice and learn, just like any other skill. The nice thing about digital is it costs next to nothing to take a picture...I once took 80 pictures of a subject until I got one I liked that was perfect. There's no excuse not to shoot pictures with digital. Another nice thing about digital is with most cameras (at least not the cheap ones) the camera information (shutter speed, lens opening, focal length) is recorded right in the picture so you can go back and look to see what settings you (or the camera) used for a particular picture.
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Old Sep 28, 2003, 9:09 PM   #13
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Maybe it would be a cool idea to add a workshop forum to Steve's fora? (hint hint)

Ofcourse what Mike says is true, digital cameras are great for experimenting and while being total clueless a hint here or there helps to put on track.

However sometimes it is fun and stimulating to try in a group. In the newbie forum there is a topic waterdrop with Nikon camera, which inspired many (including me) to achieve best in house waterdrop. Sunlighted dust dancing in a room could have the same impact to inspire and help each other to achieve personal perfection. In a group it is easier to see and judge if it's nice shot or the ultimate. With a workshop forum one can pick out what he she never tried but may find interesting.

To get back to Becky, shadows dancing on a wall is quite simple even with a silly camera. It all boils down to what do you wnat bright or dark. Centre the camera near or in planned scene on the desired color/lightvalue you want to be correct, halfpress the shutter, reframe and snap. Only catch were a cheap camera may fail is, limited light. Thus for indoors you may want to use a tripod (or anything rigid) and longer exposure, or increase iso value.
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Old Sep 28, 2003, 9:47 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathilde uP
Ofcourse what Mike says is true, digital cameras are great for experimenting and while being total clueless a hint here or there helps to put on track.
Let me add something, I've been into photography forever since my mother was too. My first camera was one from the 50's that was fully manual with no aids (you'd have to set shutter speed, f-stop and focusing yourself). My SLR which I've used for 20 years was much like that too except it had a rangefinder and light meter built-in. I also have darkroom experience from the time I was 11.

I have to say though I haven't had the freedom to experiment as much as have since going digital. I love being able to take 80 photographs of the same subject using different settings, adding a flash, etc. without having to worry about costs. Sure I spent over a $1000 on the camera, flash, lenses, etc., but since it's all paid for I now have total freedom to just go out and shoot whenever I want. Here's one of my experiements that I did for a camera group assignment using a flashlight, that I would never have wasted film on:
http://www.pbase.com/image/19967413

I guess I should put together a folder with all my experiments.
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Old Sep 28, 2003, 11:28 PM   #15
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I love the experimental aspect of digital too. I tried a few long exposure shots (5secs) using a small flashlight to "paint" light on the subject. After 3 or 4 tries I had it down pretty well & have used it since (plus I have all the info of how I did it stored in the digital files to refer to later).


1st session


Later that year...
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Old Sep 29, 2003, 4:30 AM   #16
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Thanks again for the info!

Mike - that is an incredible picture!

I didn't know digital cameras recorded all the details. That'd be a nice feature. And one of the reasons I can't wait to get a digital is to be able to take as many pictures as I want, see them instantly, keep the good and toss the bad. If you spent $1,000 for a camera it must be pretty darn nice. What is it that led you to the camera you have?

Kalypso - I thought we agreed you weren't going to post any pictures of me on this site A flashlight... who'da thought? You know it helps to be creative! Did you only use a flashlight for light or also a camera flash?
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Old Sep 29, 2003, 11:49 AM   #17
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Flashlight only, in a totally dark room. The only problem I encountered was the second model (you) having that "deer in the headlights" look on several shots! BTW, the first model was taken with an Olympus C2100UZI, the second with a Minoltia 7i (& I'll never figure out why some people complain about it's focusing problems in low-light)!
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Old Sep 29, 2003, 11:50 AM   #18
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Well, the bare camera (Olympus C-700UZ) was around $650US (converted from Canadian funds)...it's the accessories like flash, lenses, filters and more memory cards that add up.

Just want to add that anyone can take a bad picture with an expensive camera, but with practice you can take good pictures with almost any camera.
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