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Old Jun 19, 2008, 11:03 AM   #1
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Hi:

Been informed of a family wedding where the brides family (groom is a cousin of mine) will be held next March in Alaska. I have been asked once again to take pictures atanother familywedding. I don't have much details to go on yet casue it isjust being planed... all they know is plan to shot outdoors for a while when the parties arrive via limo and enter the church and reception hall and when the bride and groom leave via limobut all else should be inside.

Are their any issues with shooting in Alaska vs Virginia (never had a chance to shoot below 20 degrees and when I did I noticed the lense fogged over when I went from outside to inside...... I know its cold up there and wondering with a Fuji S9100 if the lense may fog over, freeze or if I will have any mermory card or battery issues. I use a transcend 16GB 133x CF, 4GB PQI 100x CF and 2GB sandisc ultra II CF, impact brand 2700 and 2900mha rechargeable AAs

thanks

dave
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Old Jun 19, 2008, 9:56 PM   #2
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There have been quite a few threads regarding using cameras in cold weather. As you note, moving from cold to warm can cause lens fogging. If you don't have the luxury of having a camera for each temperature, you need to plan aaccordingly, and do your indoor photos first. Batteries are also an issue in the cold. NiMH cells lose capacity rapidly in sub-freezing temps. You may want to invest in a set or two of lithium AA's for this.

I haven't had any camera or memory performance issues with either my Minolta or Pentax. If it is going to be below 20 degrees F, you should think about gloves, and practice using your camera with them. Lens caps are easy to lose, as are memory cards, etc.

If the weather is nice and sunny, the outdoor shots will likely give you problems with dynamic range. If you can get people to hold still, bracket your exposures, and combine to HDR. (if it is relatively calm- a windy day makes this nearly impossible)

That's about all I can think of at the moment, but I'm sure you'll get other replies. the best advice, of course is "Don't do it!", but I don't even take that myself, so Good Luck.

brian
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Old Jun 19, 2008, 10:54 PM   #3
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Thanks for the info..... The last family wedding I did was not because I volunteered or asked and this one I said nothing about even going and they bagged me to take pictures. I am not a good wedding photographer I rather be out on the streets taking pictures of fires, accidents and such thats where I excell my wedding photos are ok or at least thats all I think of them but this is the fourth family related wedding I have been bagged to......

Anyway you got me to thinking about snow and the need to bracket my images etc. I will look at resources that talk about photographing in snowy conditions

thanks again

dave
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Old Jul 13, 2008, 11:03 AM   #4
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I really doubt that these batteries are really 2900mAh. Go with Energizer 2450 or 2500. The written mAh is not as important as real mAh and Energizer and Duracell actually deliver what they say.

The batteries suffer in performance significantly once you get below -10C or so, but don't let them get too cold. Get a battery carrying case and keep the batteries in your inner pocket and keep them warm with body heat.


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Old Jul 13, 2008, 10:07 PM   #5
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Photo 5 wrote:
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... I will look at resources that talk about photographing in snowy conditions...
Do that, and figure on shooting with manual exposure and white balance - both of those can get very odd in snow if you let the camera choose the settings. Assuming you get there a day or so before the wedding, do some practicing. Make a real effort to avoid blowing out the snow.

As brian said, get some disposable lithium AAs. Much better cold performance and a nearly infinite shelf life. Good to have a set on hand for emergency use. About US$10/set of four.

Condensation is a serious problem going from cold to warm. put your camera into a plastic bag *BEFORE* going inside and keep it there until it has warmed up - about half an hour. So tell the folks that you will be out of operation for that time after the outdoor shots - unless you don't mind getting the inside of your camera wet.
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Old Jul 14, 2008, 11:38 AM   #6
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Quote:
Condensation is a serious problem going from cold to warm. put your camera into a plastic bag *BEFORE* going inside and keep it there until it has warmed up - about half an hour. So tell the folks that you will be out of operation for that time after the outdoor shots - unless you don't mind getting the inside of your camera wet
This would be a great reason to have a backup to use. Keep one indoors so you can keep shooting upon reentering the building. It's also a good idea to have a backup anyway in case your main camera fails which becomes a greater possibility after shooting in tough outdoor environments.
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